12 answers

Need to Break My 2 Year Old from the Bottle

Ok, I am the mother of one and I have a 2 and a half year old, who still sleeps with a bottle. I have tried to break her of this habit but I end up breaking down and just giving it to her so that she can go to bed. I need to break her of this very badly because i also have a 9 month old that goes to bed with a bottle. And we are soon expecting a new little on in July. What am I supposed to do. She does not have a passy any more, and the little one never took one. Just woundering if anyone has any suggestions

What can I do next?

So What Happened?™

I tried it for the first time last night. We started off with a glass of milk at dinner in a big girl cup. Then after dinner was finished she headed to bed with the bottle filled with water. She cried for a long while and I thought she was never going to fall asleep, but finally she did. It was hard for me to have to listen to her but I remained calm and just let her cry it out. All in all it was a good night and thanks to all for the suggestions. Tonight is the second night and we will see how it goes. Thanks all
Much apprication Jen

Featured Answers

when my daughter was 2 I told her it was time to get rid of her bottles that she was a big girl now and big girls didn't need bottles, they were yucky! Then I asked her if she wanted to throw them away and told her that she would never have them again. I then stood with her at the trash can and handed her the bottles, she threw each one away herself and with each bottle we said "Bye, bye bottle!" When bedtime came and she asked for her bottle, I reminded her of what she had done, she said bye bye bottle and we never talked about it again. She understood they were gone because she threw then away.

More Answers

Water only in a nubby brand (with the silicone nipply thingy) sippy cup.

I have a 1 year old son and I got his bottle away by putting nothing but water in it. my first son I had to give him a snack before bed oatmeal was his favorite he always woke up hungry

when my daughter was 2 I told her it was time to get rid of her bottles that she was a big girl now and big girls didn't need bottles, they were yucky! Then I asked her if she wanted to throw them away and told her that she would never have them again. I then stood with her at the trash can and handed her the bottles, she threw each one away herself and with each bottle we said "Bye, bye bottle!" When bedtime came and she asked for her bottle, I reminded her of what she had done, she said bye bye bottle and we never talked about it again. She understood they were gone because she threw then away.

My advice to you is , just put water in it.It won't hurt their teeth and eventually they won't want "just water" in it.I'm assuming you give milk in it?

When you say they go to bed with a bottle, do you mean they have the bottle in bed with them? If so, both children should be weaned from this as soon as possible. It can be very damaging to the teeth(due to acids and sugars sitting on the teeth too long), and can pose a choking hazard. The two-year-old will likely be the harder of the two to break of the habit. So I would start with the nine-month-old.

Try giving the nine-month-old the final bottle of the night, just before bedtime, while still up. Then just put the baby to bed, and let the fireworks fly. I know that this will make for some unpleasant evenings for a few nights. But it will pass. It would be a bit easier if the pacifier was an option. But, perhaps you can try offering a security object. My son slept with a bunny hand puppet until he was 3 and a half. And I bet he would still if he had not lost it. When bunny got lost, we had about 4-5 nights of difficulty getting him to bed. But, in the end, they WILL sleep.

Now, with the two-year-old, it might be a bit more difficult. Is she drinking from a cup during the day? If so, that's a good start. Only allow a bottle before putting her down for nap and bedtime. After a week of getting this routine down, take away the nap bottle, and replace it with offering a cup of something to drink before going to take a nap. Then, after about another week, take away the bottle all together. It's best to not even make the bottle an option after taking it away from her. This will bring some very big, and likely loud, protests. I wish there were an easier way. But, as stressful as this will be for you, it is about the only way to get through it.

I don't know if it's much help, but have you tried a sippy cup. My son was broke from the bottle by the time he was one year old. As soon as he was able to use a sippy cup he wanted nothing to do with a bottle. As he gets older he uses the sippy less and less at night. Another way is to just not give it to her. She might cry for the first few nights but she'll get used to not having it. This is what I had to do to break my son from the passy.

Good Luck
A.

I agree with the "cold turkey". It seems harsh and yes she WILL cry AND scream! It is rough at first but that's how I broke all my kids. My son was over 3 (blush) when we got rid of his. I let my kids watch me throw the bottles away and we said goodbye to them and tied the trash bag up and took it out. And actually, it wasn't as bad as I thought it would be. They do cry at first and ask for it but it usually only lasted a few days, a week at the most. Don't give in, be strong and it will work. Good luck! And congrats on the baby to be. :)

When we were switching from a bottle to a sippy cup the doctor recommended we fill the bottle with water and the sippy cup with milk....that way, the child still has the option of the bottle. Ours took a few sips on the bottle, tested the sippy cup and liked the milk. Then he went back to the bottle for a few sips, but decided he really wanted the milk. He switched to the sippy cup for good.

So, I recommend that you fill her bottle with water - that way, she can still have the bottle if she wants for comfort. But chances are, she'll ditch that pretty quickly.

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