6 answers

My 7 Year Old Has Stomach Pain...

My seven year old son has been complaining of stomach pain off and on for over two weeks now. We visited his pediatrician a week ago this past Monday and after an X-ray he was diagnosed with constipation. We then started miralax and worked to relieve that but the pain episodes did not get better. Then this past Tuesday morning (a week and a day later) he wolk up at 330am crying because of the pain again... Not knowing what else to do, I took him to the er... After blood, urine, and another X-ray they said they couldn't find anything seriously wrong, we followed up that day with his pediatrician and he started him on Prilosec and tums.... I know it has only been a day, but he is still in pain... What should I do? We have tried Tylenol, heating pads, warm baths, tummy rubs, elevating his head at night in case it is reflux, but nothing is helping! His doctor said we would try the reflux meds for a month and if that doesn't help he'd refer to the GI doctor, I just don't know if we should wait that long...

What can I do next?

More Answers

This might be relevant or not but it happened to my son. My son started having stomach pain off and on to the point he could not walk very far, like at the zoo. Went through a lot of things, no help. An ultrasound showed nothing. About a yr of this or more.
Then one time he had strep. Got antibiotics and a follow up appt. He still had strep. One more round of antibiotic. Not only did it cure his throat but his stomach pain. I believe strep had colonized in his stomach and was causing his pain. It's really cheap and not too many side effects for a couple rounds of strep killing antibiotic, just saying.

5 moms found this helpful

My son gets backed up as well. Have you thought about the cause? With my son it is because he has a hard time digesting milk proteins, so we switched to Almond milk and limit his cheese and yogurt and he has not had any further issues, but if the first blockage is still there and he is still eating the causal food then the situation will just get worse.

3 moms found this helpful

One of my children at 7 complained off-and on of stomach pain and also had hard stool, and took antacids... and after depression at 9, the doctors were saying her pain was from depression.

But what was actually wrong was she was in dire need of healing her gut. She needed probiotics and dietary change. Unfortunately, the dermatologist does not think of diet. The pediatrician does not think of diet. The psychiatrist does not think of diet. I guess that is why she is now getting her Master's degree in Dietetics!

She cannot have Gluten or Dairy.

The best thing is to address the cause head-on rather than attempt to cover up symptoms. However, finding and addressing the CAUSE was a long road for us. If I had to do it over today I'd start with Integrative or Functional Medicine doctors (who also can be GPs, pediatricians, and Family doctors).

1 mom found this helpful

II would request a swallow study to confirm the reflux. If the pain doesnt stop soon I would request to see a GI way sooner

1 mom found this helpful

I have GERD and started taking Prilosac. It does take several days before it's of any help. I suggest that the doctor has said to try it for a month before sending him to a specialist because he knows that it takes that long to know if it's helping.

I also suggest that he may continue to be constipated and this is a part of the pain. Continue giving him the Miralax. Be sure his diet has enough fiber and that he's drinking enough fluids.

Here are guidelines from The Mayo Clinic. http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/constipation-in-children...

"Lifestyle and home remedies
By Mayo Clinic staff
Often, simple changes in diet and routine help relieve constipation in children:

A high-fiber diet. A diet rich in fiber will help your child's body form soft, bulky stool. The amount of fiber a child needs every day varies by weight. Give your child 0.5 grams of fiber every day for each kilogram of body weight. One kilogram is equivalent to 2.2 pounds. So if your child weighs 44 pounds, divide that number by 2.2 to figure out your child's weight in kilograms. In this case, the child weighs 20 kilograms. To figure out the fiber, multiply the weight in kilograms by 0.5, which in this example leads to 10 grams of fiber daily. The upper limit of daily fiber for children is 35 grams.

Offer your child high-fiber foods, such as beans, whole grains, fruits and vegetables. Limit foods that have little or no fiber, such as cheese, meat and processed foods. But start slowly, adding just several grams of fiber a day over several weeks to reduce the amount of gas and bloating that can occur in someone who's not used to consuming high-fiber foods.

Adequate fluids. Water and other fluids will help soften your child's stool. Be wary of offering your child too much milk, however. For some children, excess milk contributes to constipation.

Adequate time for bowel movements. Encourage your child to sit on the toilet for five to 10 minutes within 30 minutes of each meal. Follow the routine every day, even during holidays and vacations.

Be supportive. Reward your child's efforts, not results. Give children small rewards for trying to move their bowels. Possible rewards include stickers or a special book or game that's only available after (or possibly during) toilet time. And don't punish a child who has soiled his or her underwear."

1 mom found this helpful

My daughter went through something similar. She was a picky eater so the doctor had her on a daily multivitamin. She took it for a few years. She'd complain of stomach pain on and off and it got so bad that one day she went to the er. They couldn't find anything on tests, so said it was a UTI. She still had pain. I stopped the vitamin and within a week the pain was gone and has never returned. She was overloaded on something from the vitamin that caused it. She was due to go to all sorts of specialists, but we were fortunate not to have too. I'd ask about your sons diet and see if that couldn't be the problem. Good luck.

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