29 answers

My 3 Year Old Can't Talk and Is Not Potty Trained Yet. Please Help Me!!

Can someone please help me My son is 3 and is not potty trained but worst of all can not talk.. He says little things like open the door, what are you doin?, book, car,. Really that's about it. I just don't know what to do. He started speech therapy like two weeks ago and no progress.. i have bought him a small potty and tried different things. It just seems that he doesn't understand whats going on... does anyone have a son like mine??????

What can I do next?

Featured Answers

Speech therapy can takes months to years... so patience, patience.

I would HIGHLY recommend NOT potty training right at the moment. He's got a lot of mental / emotional stuff going on with the speech therapy. My advice would be to wait 3-6 months, when the speech therapy is just part of the daily routine, instead of brand new. Also, older kids tend to train in no time flat. (Like a week, instead of months). So save the 2 of you some stress. :)

3 moms found this helpful

The speech therapy is not going to help with just 2 weeks. My youngest has been going for about 18 months and the first 6 weeks or so was mostly about him getting used to and trusting the therapist. I just pay attention to the therapist and try to do the same things with my son at home that she will do in the office.

2 moms found this helpful

I've had similar issues with my children (speech problems and late potty training.) My oldest was 4, the second was 5, the third was 4, and my youngest is nearly three and WAS potty training but has regressed.

Anyway, be patient and continue looking to therapists for help. You should take him to a specialist that can diagnose him, if you think that knowing the WHYs would help.

1 mom found this helpful

More Answers

Speech therapy can takes months to years... so patience, patience.

I would HIGHLY recommend NOT potty training right at the moment. He's got a lot of mental / emotional stuff going on with the speech therapy. My advice would be to wait 3-6 months, when the speech therapy is just part of the daily routine, instead of brand new. Also, older kids tend to train in no time flat. (Like a week, instead of months). So save the 2 of you some stress. :)

3 moms found this helpful

The speech therapy is not going to help with just 2 weeks. My youngest has been going for about 18 months and the first 6 weeks or so was mostly about him getting used to and trusting the therapist. I just pay attention to the therapist and try to do the same things with my son at home that she will do in the office.

2 moms found this helpful

Hi M.,
You are wise to ask. It is possible that there is something that is not integrated in his brain sensory pathways causing all of this. I am a an occupational therapist (not a doctor) but it sounds like asking your pediatrician for a pediatric/developmental occupational therapy (one who also specializes in sensory integration issues) evaluation could be a good next step. When I was treating kids, the combination of speech therapy and OT often helped speech improve more quickly than speech therapy alone. The OT will also address other developmental issues. Good luck.
Blessings,
K.

2 moms found this helpful

I read all the other answers before I wrote mine. I had same problem with my 2.5y old daughter 10 years ago(lol) seems like yesterday. She had older siblings and I now know in my case(looking back)it was due to just what someone else wrote, why bother when someone is doing it for you. One thing I didn't see in any other reply's is what I ended up doing before I know what I know now. Has your child had a hearing test?(you never know) I had to go to many hearing tests to finally be told she is ok and can hear correctly. Can't hear in the right way can't speak in the right way. FYI it seemed that the next month she started talking and then never shut up....lol

2 moms found this helpful

As for potty training, I wouldn't worry. Every boy I know was 3 1/2 - 4 1/2 before they even started! Boys ALWAYS tend to get it later.

As for the not talking, you say that he is saying some things... perhaps its the environment. Does he have to ask in order to get something? Or are there older siblings that do all of the talking and assuming for him?

If your fixing dinner, and automatically put things in front of him, or anticipate what he's going to need before he asks or motions for it, then he doesn't need to try and ask for it.

My babysitter has cards on EVERYTHING in her house. - door, sink, cold, hot, potty, chair, fridge, table, etc. Then throughout the day, as the kids go around, they have to recite the words.

M.

2 moms found this helpful

My daughter had a primary language delay and did not start talking until age 3.5 years old. I suggest you find an excellent speech therapist who is trained specifically in pediatrics and have them do some home training with you, because you are the one with your son the majority of the time!! I'd also look up Thomas Sowell's "Natural Late Talkers" for some more information. I also recommend the book "It Takes Two to Talk" as an invaluable reference for parents to help their kids facilitate language.

2 moms found this helpful

Everything is probably fine. You are doing what you can by taking him to speech therapy. I'm guessing if the speech therapist notices other issues that indicate other problems, he or she will discuss them with you. It's also certainly okay to talk to your ped. about your concerns. Sometimes kids pick up on parents anxiety and act accordingly. Not to say you're to blame, just be aware he likely understands a lot more than you think. Take deep breaths, be patient and enjoy him being little. If he needs additional help everything is still going to be okay.

2 moms found this helpful

Did you got through Early Intervention for an evaluation? Maybe he needs additional speech and/or other therapies?

1 mom found this helpful

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