18 answers

Making Own Baby Food--experiences with Beaba Babycook.

I would really like to make my son's baby food. I did not do this for my daughter (8 years old now), so I have no idea how to do it...I just know I don't want to spend the money on jarred food, and I want to know exactly what's going in his little mouth. I have heard that the Beaba Babycook is a really great device to help with making baby food, but it's not cheap. For those of you who have used it--is it worth the money? Or would I be better off just using a blender? Thanks!!

What can I do next?

So What Happened?™

I'm so glad I asked before going out and buying the Babycook...sounds like it's a great tool if there's money to spare (and there just isn't right now)..so we'll try it using a blender/magic bullet and see how we do. Thanks so, so much for the link to the wholesome baby food website--that has all the info that a novice like me will need!

Featured Answers

You do not need to buy anything to make baby food. Please do not fall for those silly gimmicks. All you need is a blender, food processor, ice cub trays, wax paper and cling wrap. That's all you need.

The wax paper is for freezing finger foods, btw. I love to cut up mango, etc. and just freeze chunks of it. I also freeze chunks of cooked squash, potato, etc. It's really easy to transition from baby food (blended food) to finger food.

wholesomebabyfood.com is awesome.

2 moms found this helpful

I made all my sons' food and all I ever needed was my food processor. Another good tip: make a lot and freeze it in ice cube trays. You can get 1-2 tablespoons into each compartment and then you can make different combinations for each feeding.

1 mom found this helpful

More Answers

You do not need to buy anything to make baby food. Please do not fall for those silly gimmicks. All you need is a blender, food processor, ice cub trays, wax paper and cling wrap. That's all you need.

The wax paper is for freezing finger foods, btw. I love to cut up mango, etc. and just freeze chunks of it. I also freeze chunks of cooked squash, potato, etc. It's really easy to transition from baby food (blended food) to finger food.

wholesomebabyfood.com is awesome.

2 moms found this helpful

I have not used the Beaba Babycook, but I just want to say that if it is expensive, it is not worth it. I made babyfood for all 3 of my children. My first child I used a hand cranked masher (way to much trouble!!) and I used a blender with the other two. I did buy a new blender that I used strictly for the baby food. But once I was done making baby food for good, I could still use it... multipurpose kitchen items are the best! I would make rather large batches of baby food, freeze it in clean ice cube trays, pop out and put in storage bags with description and date. It was soooo easy and soooo worth it. I was able to use organic veggies and spring water and still save a TON of money. and it just felt good to know I was doing that little extra! Congrats on your baby boy and on being a great mom!

1 mom found this helpful

Its true it does sound great but I don't see any use for it after baby. That is why I have not bought one. I am making my own baby food and I will be using my food processor, blender, ricer and food mill. I already have all of these things and they worked fine with my first baby. I will admit it does look like a great tool and easy to use. If you have the extra money splurge but if it is a stretch then maybe not.
PS the blender is not the best tool. A stick blender with a food chopper attachment or a food processor is better. If you do need to get something buy a magic bullet.

1 mom found this helpful

I make all my daughter's foods using a food processor. I puree the foods I want (veggies, fruits, beans, sometimes chicken or fish with veggies), and put it in ice cub trays to freeze, pop 'em out, put in ziploc baggies, label the bags, and done. It made me feel really proud that I could do this for my daughter. It was totally worth the time to me, but I never had a special cook book. I just looked things up online when needed (like wholesomebabyfood.com).

My daughter got to a point where she didn't want to be spoon-fed, so I would use the purees as a "dippy" or spread for other foods (breads, whole wheat crackers, tortillas, etc). That way, she was still getting the nutritional purees in a finger food method.

Plum Organics makes these pouches of food that I came to really like also b/c my daughter could squeeze them right into her mouth and not have the spoon battle. I ordered from ecomom. com for a discounted price, or you can buy them at BabiesRUs and other stores.

Updated

I make all my daughter's foods using a food processor. I puree the foods I want (veggies, fruits, beans, sometimes chicken or fish with veggies), and put it in ice cub trays to freeze, pop 'em out, put in ziploc baggies, label the bags, and done. It made me feel really proud that I could do this for my daughter. It was totally worth the time to me, but I never had a special cook book. I just looked things up online when needed (like wholesomebabyfood.com).

My daughter got to a point where she didn't want to be spoon-fed, so I would use the purees as a "dippy" or spread for other foods (breads, whole wheat crackers, tortillas, etc). That way, she was still getting the nutritional purees in a finger food method.

Plum Organics makes these pouches of food that I came to really like also b/c my daughter could squeeze them right into her mouth and not have the spoon battle. I ordered from ecomom. com for a discounted price, or you can buy them at BabiesRUs and other stores.

1 mom found this helpful

I'm going back to work soon and am definitely getting the Beaba. I need easy and less to clean. I also think the resale on this item will be very good (I know I've been trying to find a used one, no luck, too new so far).

1 mom found this helpful

When my son was a baby, I decided to make all his baby food because the baby food available where we live (Japan) all had multiple ingredients (egg was in everything here) from the start. I used a small handheld babyfood grinder made by Munchkin (under $10, I got mine for $5) for the difficult to grind foods, and a lot of times I just used a potato masher, a fork, or a morter and pestle. Ice cube trays work great for freezing extras. I really liked Annabel Karmel's baby food books. I have even adapted some of his favorties to adult meals and we continue to eat them regularly now. You can also find a small steaming rack that you can fit into your regular saucepans. I wouldn't spend a lot of money on something that you won't need to use for that long. Best of luck!

1 mom found this helpful

You may want to take a look at onceamonthmom.com. She bulk cooks baby food. I found that helpful!

1 mom found this helpful

I googled the babycook just because I had NO idea what it was...and it looks like a very expensive little item that would be collecting dust in my cabinet before long!!!
I made my childrens baby food and never used anything other than a pot and a food processor!!! Get a couple of skinless chicken breasts, cook them in plain water...add some veggies and then put it in the food processor and just add the broth as you whip it up..until you have it to the consistency that you want!!! You can either freeze it in ice cube trays or in baby food jars. ( I DID buy commercially canned fruits...it just wasn't economical to try and do it myself!! And then I used those empty jars to freeze the baby food I was making!).
You can also use a small pot roast ( with as little fat as possible) or a small turkey breast for the meat base of your meals.
You son will LOVE it!!!

1 mom found this helpful

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