18 answers

Limiting Use of Electronics (Video Games, Computer, Tv)

My 10 year old daughter spends a lot of time using electronics (nintendo ds, tv, computer). Usually, I periodically suggest that she take a break from those things, but I'm thinking I need to set a time limit. (We had a timer on the TV but it broke.) If you limit these items, how much time do you allow for each and how do you keep track of the time?

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Featured Answers

definately limit time on them, this would have to be indivual, but it isn't good for their eyes, and they need other experiences in their life besides sitting in front of a game or tv. You could explain that it isn't a punishment, it is a life giving thing to do other things.

I suggest "earning" electronics time - have her do a chore or physical activity to earn 30 minutes of electronics time - for example, for every 30 minutes she spends playing outside, she could be rewarded with 15 or 30 minutes of electronics time or for unloading the dishwasher, she earns 15 minutes of electronics time. There are lots of great ways to do this - I would suggest using Handipoints (www.hanidpoints.com) or "tickets" of some kind that equate to 15-minute periods of electronics time. This will keep her active & give her rewards for doing so while you can still monitor the amount of time she spends doing these type of things.

More Answers

One hour a day and that's it. No if/ands or buts... Make her a read book/magazine/play board games/cards... take walks... I feel as though the computer/video games, etc. makes people unsocialable. Also, being in academia, students do poorly with study skills/attention because they seek the constant entertainment that computers/video games, etc. provide.

Good luck.

my daughter is turning ten tomorrow and we have limited her to three hours a week of tv since she was in kindergarten! an hour on mon, wed and fri. she has really thrived over it, electronics aren't just a past time for kids anymore, they are an obsession! we also allow no video games in our house and the computer is definitely off limits! some moms call me over doing it in this department but while their kids are two inches away from a tv screen or a nintendo ds my daughter is reading a book or playing outside, riding a bike or scrapbooking. We didnt have these things as children, do you feel deprived? I know i dont and i know for a fact that my daughter doesn't either. But each mom has to parent her kids in her own unique way so good luck to you and congratulations for seeing the need to limit their time! Many blessings!

Hi S., I used to give my kids 10 minutes a day for each chore they completed. They usually have 3 chores which gives them 30 minutes of free time before they are again "unplugged". On weekends I allowed more time to be earned. My kids are old enough and active enough that I don't have to do this anymore. They very seldom watch any tv, play any video games, or get on the computer. I think this is greatly because we controlled it so strictly when they were younger that they found other hobbies, interests, and friends.

I am really in favor of strict time limits on passive time wasters. Use a kitchen timer with no exceptions. You are the parent, after all. However, children who have spent a lot of time with these games often have not learned how to entertain themselves any other way. Be ready with plenty of things to do like reading materials, homework, housework, a game with you or other family members, outside play, etc. Do not allow yourself to get in the habit of pushing the child onto the "electronic babysitter".

when my oldest two were younger we would issue "momma buck" that could be redeemed for TV/Computer/or video game time. Every week they would get 20 minutes worth automatically. However they would have th opportunity to earn extras by doing extra work around the house. I printed the "money" up on my computer and took them to the teacher supply and had them laminated.

D.
SAHM of two still at home 18 and 5.

I suggest "earning" electronics time - have her do a chore or physical activity to earn 30 minutes of electronics time - for example, for every 30 minutes she spends playing outside, she could be rewarded with 15 or 30 minutes of electronics time or for unloading the dishwasher, she earns 15 minutes of electronics time. There are lots of great ways to do this - I would suggest using Handipoints (www.hanidpoints.com) or "tickets" of some kind that equate to 15-minute periods of electronics time. This will keep her active & give her rewards for doing so while you can still monitor the amount of time she spends doing these type of things.

An over timer or microwave timer

I would definately set a limit on these things. And keep a very close eye on the computer thing. My stepdaughter has a problem with all of these things. She is constantly wanting to be on the internet or watching tv. Her friend stayed the night with us this weekend and they got on the internet onto myspace and I had never been on myspace and a bunch of naked pictures popped up and profanity. Her mom lets her have a myspace page, which I think at 11 is abosolutely ridiculous so it's hard to tell her not to be on it over here at our house. I set apart different times for her to go outside and play. I have her play more board games that actually teach her things and I tell her she has to ask for permission to get on the computer and I check on her all the time to make sure she is on safe websites. It makes me sick to see how all of these things are controlling our children. As far as how much should she spend on these things, it all depends upon your family life. I would give her 1 hour a day on the computer or DS game, and 2-3 hours on the t.v. It is so hard to set a limit with everything that is out there. The best of luck to you.

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