17 answers

Kindergarten Disaster

I am new to this community and am interested in home schooling my kindergarten son. The school year is half over so we cannot enroll him in the online program I was looking into. Is there a better way?

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I am not anti homeschooling, however if you are planning on putting into public school in Elementary then I say put him in public for Kindergarten. Kindergarten is a great place to start. It gives them very positive social skills, learning to listen to another adult and is a great foundation for them later in school. If you are going to home school him for good then that is another matter. I just firmly believe that going from doing it to not doing it is huge adjustment for them and I think Kindergarten is such a great way for kids to learn about peers, playing with others and need that time away from mom. Just my two cents.

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We use Bob Jones. http://www.bjupress.com/distance_learning/homeschool.html

I use the videos. The only deciding factor for us between A Beka and Bab Jones was the hard drive. I love it! Math is the main complaint either way. We're using it for now, but will probably switch to Saxon in by 2nd or 3rd grade. Right now we just need simplicity, thus the videos. The curriculum is intense. It would be hard to finish by next school year, although many days our son does two of each subject since he loves it so much. When we're all done, we'll have done school in about 6-7 months. GL It's a lot of fun, but a lot of work even with the videos.

Idaho Virtual Academy is a very rigorous program. If you are a busy person it may not be for you anyway. They expect that you will spend a lot of time and stay on track online and offline with the social programs that they offer. They have the advantage of having tutors and special education but not flexibility. Idaho Distance Education Academy is a lot more flexible, offer special education testing and support and gives all of the timelines but allow you to choose from your own curriculum from an approved list. We used this program for 2 years until we got into another charter school. I didn't find them as supportive as I wanted but the reimbursement program provided us with the finances to be involved in classical arts that we couldn't afford on our own. I think before you start homeschooling, check out what the Idaho Standards are, they are available online, think carefully about why you are unhappy with public school and be realistic with what your schedule will support. If you really don't have time it might be better to look for a scholarship for private school, get tutoring after public school or homeschooling might be a good fit. Not all curriculum is right for your family, so read some books and find out what your educational fit is. I love "The well-trained mind" by Jessie Wise and Susan Wise Bauer.

My name is H., When my little brother turned 5 in the summer time my mom held him back from doing Kindergarten and it has done him a world of good. We have found him to be more mature and scalastically mature. If your son is only 5 it will not hurt him to be held back until he is 6. It will do him a world of good.

I'm biased, but, unless you are trained as an educator, I don't think you should homeschool. I'm a mother of 2 and a public school teacher with a Masters degree. Typically, the children I see who are homeschooled and who re-enter the public education system are behind their peers both socially and academically. Of course, there are exceptions. And I'm not saying the public education system isn't without its problems. I think a balance is good. Kids should attend public school and then parents should offer enrichment at home. Also, be involved in your child's school. I'm interested to see what other advice you are given.

Ask the school district for a copy of the kindergarten "report card" because this will list all the skills he needs to have if you choose to put him in first grade next year. It's important that he is up-to-date with peers in your area. Maybe you can find some fun learning books at Barnes and Noble or the grocery store. Good luck!

Hi E.. I homeschool my 2nd grade son (since kindergarten) and have taught my preschooler to read (at a 2nd -3rd grade level) and give most of the credit to a wonderful book available at Borders or Barnes called "how to teach your child to read in 100 easy lessons" . It takes about 20 minutes a day. It also covers writing all their letters. If you add making sure he knows his numbers 1-100 and teaching him the pledge to the flag, you don't need to pay for a program and he'll be ahead of any kindergarten "graduating" class I've ever come across. Good luck.

I am not anti homeschooling, however if you are planning on putting into public school in Elementary then I say put him in public for Kindergarten. Kindergarten is a great place to start. It gives them very positive social skills, learning to listen to another adult and is a great foundation for them later in school. If you are going to home school him for good then that is another matter. I just firmly believe that going from doing it to not doing it is huge adjustment for them and I think Kindergarten is such a great way for kids to learn about peers, playing with others and need that time away from mom. Just my two cents.

There are so many choices out there and you don't have to wait you can start now. Kindergarten is fun and easy! You could actually do most of the teaching with Library books.

But if you want more structure just go online and do a search for "Kindergarten Curriculum" You can also go to Mardels books store there is one in littleton and they have a great selection of books/curriculum to choose from.

Hope that helps- there are also alot of homeschool communities that you can connect with too.

Here are a few I am apart of:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Christian_Homeschoolers/
http://faithhsg.org/

Email for another: ____@____.com Her name is robin - I havn't actually met with this one yet but will be on Friday.

You can go onto yahoo and find others too!

Hope that helps!

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