17 answers

Is My 17 Month Old Not Saying Enough Words???

Hi. I am a first time mom, my little girl just turned 17 months. She has been saying "momma" & "dadda" for a while. She has also said "shoe" once, she will say the cats name "Mont-Mont" once in a while and the other night when she picked up her cel phone she said "hello". She knows what things are if you ask her where the fan is, her eyes, nose, tummy, etc., does well that way and also will point to things and say "whats dat" but my husband and I dont know if she is not speaking enough words at this point. Myabe we are just being paranoid?! I know all children are different and do things in their own time but when should you start to be concerned they arent saying enough? She is a little chatter box, has been for months but not actual words. My friend has a 24 month old and her daughter speaks a lot of words and short sentences. I know there is a big difference between 17 month and 24 months. Let me know what you think. Also, what are some "first" words children say so that my huaband and I can maybe work with her? Thanks!
K

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Hi K.,

I too had the same worry about my son who is now 3. At 18 months of age he barely said anything, but he knew what I was saying and understood everything. I even asked the doctor in my concern if he was on track. She told me not to worry b/c he was saying enough words, could hear me, and understand me. By the time he was 2, he was speaking two word sentences. They pick up speech very quickly. It seems like almost overnight. So just be patient and keep saying the words for every item. She will pick it up.

She sounds like a normal 17 month old. My oldest was very similar. Looking back she didn't speak very much because she didn't have too...oldest children have no competition for their parents attention and often have their needs met before they have to voice a "demand". My subsequent children all spoke earlier because they had to gain my attention to get what they needed. The exception was my 1st born son who is also a twin. The situation there...his twin sister spoke for him!

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Don't worry... and I know you have heard that already. My 16 month old is not even saying mama or dada yet, so your child is ahead of mine, LOL! We're not worried, he babbles all the time, recognizes objects and so forth. As I said with my first child about a lot of things, they won't graduate high school in ( fill the blank, mine was diapers) and our children will graduate high school communicating.

Speak with your daughter's pediatrician if you are concerned. You can also have your daughter evaluated through early interventin services, which are free until the age of three. If her dc is concerned, you will be given the appropriate number to call to get your daughter evaluated. Her doc may also suggest that your daughter be seen by an ear, nose and throat doc to evaluate hearing.

as long as she is chattering, she is probably fine; just make sure you listen to her talk, if you can figure out what she is talking about (like her shoes), you can respond about the same topic; with the attention you are giving her, i'll bet she will be talking your ear off in no time

She sounds like a normal 17 month old. My oldest was very similar. Looking back she didn't speak very much because she didn't have too...oldest children have no competition for their parents attention and often have their needs met before they have to voice a "demand". My subsequent children all spoke earlier because they had to gain my attention to get what they needed. The exception was my 1st born son who is also a twin. The situation there...his twin sister spoke for him!

You are right - they are all different...as long as she is communicating in some way and interactive with you, no need to worry at 17 months. My daughter hardly spoke at all until 2. We were so glad that we had started baby signs with her at around 9 months - we could have whole conversations by the time she was 18 months. She had learned that she could communicate with us using gestures so she'd make up new signs herself in order to explain a new word to us. That was really neat. My grandmothers always said that she would never learn to talk until we stopped using those silly signs. Not too long after 2, she started talking in sentences and her vocabulary was quite large. I think it was just part of her personality. She is very shy to this day and is also a perfectionist - if she isn't confident that she can do it, she won't let anyone see her do it until she has mastered a skill. She was the same with walking...She pulled up to standing at 6 months on the nose - didn't walk until 11 months. She could stand up without holding on to things and play in the middle of the room. But she wouldn't take a step. When she started, she didn't really fall...

We started signs with my son too. He was the opposite - very verbal from the start. He'd learn the word before the sign. He did some of the signs for emphasis, but really didn't need them at all.

The signs really are wonderful if you have a child that isn't very verbal as you can really understand them at an earlier age and communicate quite well surprisingly.

Both of my children had limited vocabularies until their second birthdays. Then it seemed like overnight they added several new words, spoke in short sentences, and started verbally communicating their needs. I had spoken to the pediatrician when my oldest was around 18 months. She said to watch for other language skills - the addition of ANY word, body movements, facial expressions, intonation in their babbling, following simple directions, responding to his name, etc. As long as I could see him using those forms of communication then there was likely nothing to worry about. She was right. She explained that some kids put so much energy into playing, moving and exploring that they don't talk as early.

Both of my children's first words were variations of 'mama' and 'dada'. 'Ball', 'yea', 'wow' were early words followed by 'woof-woof' (for dog), 'ashes' and 'down'(from Ring Around the Rosie), 'again' and 'tickle'. We used to tickle them and say "tickle, tickle, tickle, tickle, tickle". They picked up on that and repeated it as 'ducka, ducka, ducka, ducka, ducka'.

Try not to worry. My bet is that you'll see a big change after her second birthday.

I read your question with great interest because as the mother of a now three year old, I too wondered if she was speaking enough at 18 months. She is being evaluated for speech delay this week as she knows WHAT she wants to say, but just cant pronounce them correctly. She is my second, and I barely have a problem knowing what she wants, but if I really listen to her, I cant understand her clearly, and that is what the doctors want to see. Her PCP told me to work with her and try and get her to say things correctly, rather than just give her what I know she wants. I would talk with your doctor now and let him/her know your concerns and things you should look out for. Good luck!

Every child is different. My son will be 2 in 2 weeks and still says only a handful of words, but understands everything, follows directions perfectly, and can "tell" you exactally what he wants through a modified sign language. What the last person posted, that they can get their point across, they will not talk until later is really true. It just is not quite working for us pretending not to know what he wants! They will all speak though, not to worry. I was told by my doctor that as long as they clearly understand, there is nothing to worry about.

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