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Is It Unsafe to Use a Baby Crib Bumper past a Certain Age?

Hello! I'm putting together a crib for my six month old and noticed a tag on the bumper that says to remove it when baby can pull herself to standing and sit unaided. I've never heard of anyone being concerned about this before, and it seems a bit over the top as far as safety concerns go. Is this something that I should definitely abide by or is it a company disclaimer that, as long as I'm conscious of my child's safety, I can ignore as the company covering it's legal bases? I appreciate your input!! Thank you!

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I used the bumbers till my son was 2 and out of the crib. If I took them off he bumped his head into the rails or get his legs caught between them. When he started standing up I loosened them so he couldn't use them as a step stool to climb out. They squished down when he stood on them.

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The reason that this is on the tag is because some babies will use the crib bumpers as a cushion to stand on when they learn to get out of their cribs. If the baby falls while trying to get out, it can harm the child and cause a law suit. It's their way of protecting themselves from parental ignorance.

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I didn't use the bumper until my girl was around 6 months old (I was worried more about suffocation since she loves to sleep smushed up against the soft). Then, she started sleeping all "crazy" and she'd wake up crying because her arm or leg was stuck out of the crib! I tied it on loosely and haven't had a problem with my now 18-month-old trying to climb out. When she steps on it, it just flattens out. It is good at keeping limbs and pacifiers inside the bed!

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One reason child safety organizations recommend against crib bumpers is that they pose a risk of suffocation. Just like a pillow or thick blanket, crib bumper pads can restrict a baby's breathing if the bumper is up next to the baby's nose or mouth. Suffocation risk is greatest when babies are very young and unable to move themselves away from potential hazards.

A secondary risk with crib bumpers is strangulation. Babies can become entangled in the crib bumper or its ties, or can get between the bumper and the crib. A few crib bumpers have been recalled because of stitching or trim that can come loose. Those loose pieces also could cause injury.

Rebreathing of stale air is another concern with crib bumper pads. The bumper reduces the flow of fresh air around baby during sleep, particularly if his or her face is very close to the bumper. The American Academy of Pediatrics suggests that some infants, when they are overheated or lack sufficient oxygen during sleep, are unable to arouse themselves enough to prevent death. Re-breathing of stale air may be a contributing factor to SIDS.

In the official AAP policy statement on SIDS suggests that some babies are more prone to SIDS due to biological factors such as brainstem development or serotonin levels. However, the policy statement indicates that "more than one scenario of preexisting conditions and initiating events may lead to SIDS." It goes on to say that we cannot focus on only one potential cause for SIDS, because there isn't likely to be just one cause. We cannot know ahead of time whether a baby is predisposed to SIDS due to biological reasons. What we can do, and what AAP suggests, is to reduce all of the other environmental risk factors, including the use of crib bumpers.
Solutions
Since many infant safety organizations now recommend that nothing be inside the crib at all, the safest route for parents and babies would be to remove crib bumper pads altogether. For day care centers, the push for increased sleep safety may soon result in states mandating that child care providers no longer use crib bumper pads. For parents who are still concerned about their child sticking arms and legs through the crib slats, and feel that they must use a bumper pad, there are mesh crib bumpers on the market today that allow more air to flow through the crib.

In addition to SIDS, another risk with the bumpers is the ability a child might have to use them as a ladder. Young babies and children have been known to step on the bumper to try to get out of the crib.

3 moms found this helpful

I like Wonder Bumpers - you can leave them on. Very much worth looking into :)

http://www.gomamagodesigns.com/products.html?order=price&...

2 moms found this helpful

I used the bumbers till my son was 2 and out of the crib. If I took them off he bumped his head into the rails or get his legs caught between them. When he started standing up I loosened them so he couldn't use them as a step stool to climb out. They squished down when he stood on them.

2 moms found this helpful

The reason that this is on the tag is because some babies will use the crib bumpers as a cushion to stand on when they learn to get out of their cribs. If the baby falls while trying to get out, it can harm the child and cause a law suit. It's their way of protecting themselves from parental ignorance.

1 mom found this helpful

You're not supposed to use regular bumpers ever. They are have been linked to SIDS and other types of injuries, and death. There are only 2 safe alternatives on the market Breathable Bumper and Wonder Bumpers. The American Academy of Pediatrics does not recommend using any type of bumpers. There should be no blankets, toys, etc in the crib. With all the information regarding the hazard of using a bumper I'm surprised they have not been removed from stores and I'm more greatly surprised that parents still do not have this information.

1 mom found this helpful

Just take it out when they can stand up on it, getting closer to climbing out of the crib...

I was told by pediatrician not to use them because of sids. Never heard because of climbing out. They look cute but not worth the chance.

I didn't use the bumper until my girl was around 6 months old (I was worried more about suffocation since she loves to sleep smushed up against the soft). Then, she started sleeping all "crazy" and she'd wake up crying because her arm or leg was stuck out of the crib! I tied it on loosely and haven't had a problem with my now 18-month-old trying to climb out. When she steps on it, it just flattens out. It is good at keeping limbs and pacifiers inside the bed!

The bumper was originally intended to prevent a baby from getting injured when the crib slats were wider apart then they are now. The point of removing it when the baby can pull himself up is that they might step on it and knock themselves out of the crib--using it even unintentionally like a step. The company has to protect itself so it is pretty much up to you.

I think they say that because if the child can stand up, they might use the bumper to stand on and then climb or fall out of the crib.

I kept the bumper in for my two kids until they were done with the crib. I actually never saw a warning like that. Just make sure it is attached at all points to the crib so the baby can not pull it off.

Hi, I think the main concern is that the baby can step on the bumper and raise him/herself out of the crib. Our solution was to tie the bumper loosely (When our son was younger and we made sure the bumpers were on tight and would not budge. One he could pull up, we loosened up the ties, so the bumper would smush down and be really compressed if stepped on. ) and to put our baby in a sleep sack.

We use the Breathable Bumpers, they come is tons of different colors. My son is 10 months old and pulls up but these are so his legs and arms dont get caught.

Honestly, there is a lot of discussion that bumpers aren't safe at any age. It's considered a SIDS risk. Because of what they shared with us at the Baby Safety class at our hospital we didn't use a bumper at all. Both my kids did just fine without them!

-M

Bumper pads were used because babies could fit their heads through the slats of a crib. The APA has mandated that crib slats be made close together to prevent any child from getting their head through.
We were told right from the beginning not to use a bumper pad. Dr. said it was a risk for SIDS. When our son got old enough to stick his legs and arms through we asked about the mesh bumper pads and Dr. still said no. We followed her advice and would get up at night to push his arms or legs back through the crib. This only lasted a month and now he can no longer fit through. My son moves over the whole crib when he sleeps and I have never seen one bruise on his head from hitting it on the crib. I personally think that regardless of how many people say they used it and their baby is fine, I don't want to be the one whose baby is not fine.

My little girl was able to stand pretty early and she tried stepping on the bumper. We removed it because we thought she might use it as a step and tumble out of her crib (not that she was in the crib that much as she didn't like it). I think its what you feel comfortable with and if you feel confident your baby isn't at that stage of messing with the bumpers. Good Luck

We've never taken the bumpers off the bed. Our kids are 4 and 2 (still sleeps in the crib with the bumper).

Yes, they were originally for keeping the arms/legs from getting caught in slats. No, they're probably not necessary.

We make sure ours are TIGHTLY attached to the crib and come down past the mattress to minimize the risk of anything happening.

Is it safer to remove them? Yes, at this point, I don't feel uncomfortable having them on.

i quit using ours when my son started getting mobile, he would wedge his head into the corner, or end up under it, between the bumper and the side of the crib....it quit being practical, quit doing it's job, so out it went. not sure i'd have one if i had another baby, seems to me to be just one of those "cute" things that we get just because it's the thing to do ...but i'm not sure how much good it does. plus what a pain to put in and take out EVERY time you have to change the sheet...grr!

My angel used the bumper as a step to help her climb out of her crib. So you might want to take it out once your little one is more mobile.

Good luck!

I use this one called the Breathable Bumper. It is mesh so air flows through it, avoiding the re-breathing air issue, although I am not sure that is a really big thing or not. But it is also thin and collapses if it gets stood on. It has velcro that attaches on the outside so there are no strings and it does a good job of keeping little arms and legs from getting out of the slats. I tried removing the bumpers all together with my first and was always having to go pull arms and legs out of the slats. So this thing was a life saver. Now with my second, he is only 5 months and I have already had to go get his little arms and legs out bc he figure out how to mash the bumper down and get his little parts out! But it still helps and I don't have to intervene too often:) Good luck! I found mine online, it used to come in baby green, lavender and white.

I believe the warning is because once they can stand up, they could use the bumper to climb on and fall out of the crib. I used a bumper with both of my children and never had a problem, but we lowered the crib to the lowest level making it impossible for them to climb out even if they stood on the bumper.

The concern is that the child will stand on the bumper -- using it as a "step up" to help get over the crib rail.

My son is 2 and I still use the bumpers. I took them out at one time and found that his arms/legs would stick out and I worried more about him getting wedged. I think it's a personal decision, but I have heard they are concerned about kids standing on them or suffocating.

the bumper poses a risk of suffocation. the baby can roll forward before they can move backwards. i actually walked into the room to find my first baby with his face in the bumper. and it doesnt have to be smothering, even just close up is dangerous because they re-breathe their own co2. the way a lot of them attach to the crib is also a strangulation risk. and later on, its a risk due to climbing on it. PLEASE just because people tell you they did it and everything was fine doesnt mean anything. our parents also laid us on the bench seat in the car when they drove and our moms smoked when they were pregnant. just because most of us are fine doesnt make it a good idea. is it really worth it? there is no reason for them aside from being cute. how hard is your infant going to bonk into the side of the crib, really? the thing that is upsetting is when they get their little arms and legs caught in the slats of the crib. the best thing you can do is to buy the crib tent 2. one step ahead has them, i bet you can get one a bit cheaper on ebay. it keeps their little limbs in, as well as their pacifier or whatever. and if you get it now then your baby will be used to it and in a few months when he/she is ready to climb out you just zip up and dont have to worry. i couldnt live without it, 3 kids later. my almost 3 year old is still in the crib, and has always had the tent. he kisses and hugs me, tells me "I ZIP IT!" and zips himself in and lays down and goes to sleep. its a beautiful thing, he loves it and i know hes safe.

I took ours off b/c our daughter was using it as a stepping stool to try to climb out of the crib.

Hi K., I used the bumper pads from birth to 19 months when i took my toddlers out of the crib, and there was never any problem, I have no idea what standing and bumper pads have to do with the other, maybe they think they will stand on them and climb out who knows. As soon as mine started pulling themselves up i lowered the mattress all the way down and put the drop side of the railing against the wall. J.

I think it's a case of a kid using them as a step stool and either falling or climbing out of the crib.
I always used them while they were in a crib b/c if I didn't they'd get their legs (I have REALLY chubby kiddos, when they are babies) stuck between the bars.

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