30 answers

Is It a "Lie" to Tell Your Kids Santa Is Real?

Ok I know this is a weird question, but...I just thought about this. Do any of you believe it is lying to your children telling them Santa is real? It's just I want my kids to trust me and I want to be completely honest with them about everything so maybe they'll want to do the same with me. I just think when they find out the truth one day it can be heart breaking when they find out he's not real. I maybe be looking to far into this, but my kids arent really old enough to totally understand it good. But anyways this question is kind of for fun just to see what everyone else thinks!
By the way it is NOT spoling the magic of Christmas by telling them he's not real. What is so bad about knowing that your parents and loving family and friends worked their butts off to buy them those presents? I dont think anything is wrong with that. It is still magical Santa or not. Because when they go to bed and wake up with a TON of presents under the tree while they are sound asleep, I think thats pretty magical.

What can I do next?

Featured Answers

If we can't tell kids Santa, is real...

Then we can't tell them to believe in fairy tales, Tinkerbell, princes and castles, imaginary friends, magical lands...or just about anything they read in a book.
I think I want my kid to be allowed an imagination. To dream about magical things. To marvel, at life and have wonder. Too soon, the world be very real to him and these things will just be a memory.

Kids grow out of Santa. Everyone I've known says they just grew up and knew it wasn't real. I've never met an adult, that is haunted by finding out about Santa. Santa is NOT harmful. I think parents are uptight about this and segregate their kids from enjoying, what other children enjoy.

6 moms found this helpful

I've never met a kid who told their parents "I lie to you about sex, drugs and stealing because you let me believe Santa was real until I was 10."

I've also never met a kid who said, "The fact that you lied to me about Santa lead me down this road to self destruction."

I just think that sometimes a child needs something to hold onto. I think there is a difference between a little white lie like 'Santa' or "In NO way do those jeans make you look fat" and a lie told with malicious devious intent.

5 moms found this helpful

My kids know that Santa is not real. They still watch Santa movies etc....but they know that Santa, the tooth fairy, easter bunny etc...are all Mom and Dad. I feel the same way you do, I don't ever want my kids to look back and say "It's ok to lie because Mom and Dad lied about Santa" - in my opinion, a lie is a lie......

3 moms found this helpful

More Answers

<<GASP!!!!>>
Santa is NOT real?
No one told me!

OK--actually my mom told me...AND she threw The Tooth Fairy AND The Easter Bunny under the bus the same day.

I survived and I think my son will too! :-)

16 moms found this helpful

NO NO and NO! Do a search on this site because this question and topic have been on here about 5 times a day for the past month. It's fun; it's make believe; if your kid hits 8 or 10 or 12 and is so horrified that you "lied" to him or her about Santa, and cannot see it for the holiday fun that it is, then I think maybe there are other things going on at home. No one thought twice about this when I was a kid -we had fun, the parents had fun and we all found out sooner or later and it didn't affect our trust of mommy and daddy one iota.

14 moms found this helpful

Sigh... sometimes I think we Mamas really do spend too much time thinking about ways that we "might" scar our kids. I'm not saying this to be critical S., I just wonder when pretend and make believe became lying to our kids.

(Most) Kids grow up soon enough... they conform and lose the brilliance of imagination that almost all of us start out with, soon enough. What's wrong with letting them believe in the magic of things they can't see?

I know that your question is about Santa, but where does that end? My daughter and son love the idea of fairies, the easter bunny, santa, mermaids, dragons... I don't even have to provide additional info because they make up their own stories about them. I have the most wonderful artwork from my daughter about the tooth fairy (and other fairies). When they ask me if they are real I just ask them if they believe in them. There will come a time when they don't believe... soon enough.

9 moms found this helpful

I don't consider it lying to my kids, and I'm always surprised to hear adults talking about how "crushed" or "devastated" they were when they found out that Santa is an idea not a person. I remember finding out, but being excited to be let in on the secret and getting to help my parents keep up the act for my 3 younger siblings. I just can't imagine not allowing my children to believe in the magic of Santa. Is this really something we have to protect our kids from? I think not.

7 moms found this helpful

If we can't tell kids Santa, is real...

Then we can't tell them to believe in fairy tales, Tinkerbell, princes and castles, imaginary friends, magical lands...or just about anything they read in a book.
I think I want my kid to be allowed an imagination. To dream about magical things. To marvel, at life and have wonder. Too soon, the world be very real to him and these things will just be a memory.

Kids grow out of Santa. Everyone I've known says they just grew up and knew it wasn't real. I've never met an adult, that is haunted by finding out about Santa. Santa is NOT harmful. I think parents are uptight about this and segregate their kids from enjoying, what other children enjoy.

6 moms found this helpful

I'm a realist, very logical & find it hard to tell my kids things that aren't true. I do tell them Santa is real. My husband tells me it helps their imaginations...and I really think it does. Can you imagine a child making up a story about a flying horse (or something like that) & the parent saying..."no Billy, horses cannot fly." If a child is told these things over & over, it will greatly limit his imagination and creativity and that's an unfair thing to do to a child. Believe me, it's hard...but when something comes up before you answer, ask yourself...is this just an imaginative child being creative, or true misinformation considered to be a lie? I think the magic of Christmas is in the sense of wonder kids have about Santa, imagining how it all happens & the hope & anticipation they feel on Christmas Eve. I think telling them Santa is not real at a young age will steal some of their innocence.

6 moms found this helpful

Last year my 6 year old could fly. This year, he can "glide." Next year, it will probably called "jumping." I make sure he's not planning to fly or glide off the roof and let it be.

For my 6 year old, Santa is VERY real. If I told him otherwise RIGHT NOW, he'd be devastated - AND he'd come up with some other magic to believe in. Because he's 6.

When he's old enough, I hope Santa is "real" for him in the same way Santa is "real" for me - because *I* help make him real. And I hope he will want to help make Santa *real* for his little brothers at that time!

He all ready understands that Santa and parents are in cahoots. And when it's time, I hope he's not so literal-minded as to see this tradition of imaginary play as a "lie."

edit to add: I would hesitate to insist "Santa is REAL, he really comes down the chimney, and so on"...because that's pushing it. And it doesn't really matter to me what other folks do. I have been an elf for too long for it to phase me when people tell me my Xmas boss isn't real! : )

5 moms found this helpful

I've never met a kid who told their parents "I lie to you about sex, drugs and stealing because you let me believe Santa was real until I was 10."

I've also never met a kid who said, "The fact that you lied to me about Santa lead me down this road to self destruction."

I just think that sometimes a child needs something to hold onto. I think there is a difference between a little white lie like 'Santa' or "In NO way do those jeans make you look fat" and a lie told with malicious devious intent.

5 moms found this helpful

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