18 answers

Infant Can Move Fingers on the Right but Not the Arm

I have a friend who just gave birth to a baby girl who was 10lbs 6oz. She was bigger than they expected so she pushed her out. In the hospital she realized that she is only moving her left arm and just the hand and fingers on her right. She is taking her to see a specialist but has anyone else ever dealt with this or know anything about it? Is this something that can happen when the baby is in the womb or when they come out?

What can I do next?

Featured Answers

Needs to be seen by a doctor. Sometimes a shoulder or arm is broken in the birth process, or it could be a neuological problem, hopefully temporary.

1 mom found this helpful

it sounds like the baby has Erb's palsy. it is usually caused by a traumatic birth. The baby should see a dr and get into occuapational therapy for an evaulation ASAP. Hope this helps you can google Erb's palsy on the internet. The good news is the baby is young and most likely the trauma to the nerve will correct itself.

More Answers

It can happen that a baby dislocates a shoulder during the birth process- I am sure that the doctors will check this right away. Hope she gets good care.
M.

1 mom found this helpful

Needs to be seen by a doctor. Sometimes a shoulder or arm is broken in the birth process, or it could be a neuological problem, hopefully temporary.

1 mom found this helpful

10lb 4oz that's a tight squeeze, I'd be going to a specialist too, after a chiropractor.
Best of luck to your friend & baby. A. H

1 mom found this helpful

R. ~
I'm an OB nurse and have seen this happen more than once.
It could be that since the baby was large, there could have been a shoulder dystocia ... which means that the shoulder was stuck during the delivery. Sometimes it results in a palsy of that arm, which sometimes can resolve on it's own or maybe with physical therapy. Sometimes, unfortunatly, it doesn't resolve completely. She should go to the specialist so that therapy can be started right away.
D.

1 mom found this helpful

Do you know if the hospital checked for a broken collar bone on the side you refer to? Baby being so big she could have had this happen and it can cause nerve damage as well. The reason I am telling you this is because, my son who was just born at 8 lbs with a extremely easy delivery ended up with a broken collar bone on his left side. However he is moving the arm and hand no problem now. His doctor however was asking if we noticed him not moving his arm or hand and also has told us to tell her if he stops using it or doesn't seem to want to use it. Another thing the hospital didn't find the fracture it was the pediatrician who examined him the next morning after birth who found it. Best of luck to your friend.

1 mom found this helpful

A friend of mine's son broke his collarbone coming out. Possibility? Worth checking out, good idea with a specialist. J. - mom to a 16 and 10 year old.

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Hi R.,

Two thoughts come to mind about your friend's baby. The most likely cause, if she gave birth vaginally, is that the baby (being bigger) broke it's collar bone during the birth process. It's a little common in bigger babies. She would have probably heard a loud sound when that happened. Another possibility that comes to mind it that maybe a nerve was irritated either during the pregnancy, caused by position in the womb, or during birth. I hope her little one is feeling better and moving her arm all over in no time.

1 mom found this helpful

Very large babies can have their bones broken while being born. In 1972, my brother-in-law suffered from a broken collar bone when he was born at 9lbs, 8oz. In 2000, my niece broke her collar bone while being born as well. She wasn't quite 9lbs. I would absolutely have this new baby checked out. My mil says that they didn't realize that bil's collar bone was broken for several weeks! The doctor didn't even know! Poor baby! I would absolutely have this baby checked for broken bones! I hope everything turns out ok!

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