16 answers

Ideas for Storing a Child's School Work

I generally try and save some of the work my kids do during the school year and any art work that they do -- my question is does anyone have any good ideas of how or what to store this type of stuff in? I've been storing it in some plastic storage containers with lids but not sure if this is the best thing for long term storage. Also, trying to figure out if I need to store this type of stuff inside the house or if it can be safely stored in the attic.

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So What Happened?™

Thanks to everyone for the wonderful suggestions on storing school & art work. All the suggestions were great and I think I am going to try a combination of the suggestions -- I like the idea of using yearly filing crates as well as scanning the work and not to mention framing some of the best projects. I probably just need to be more selective and save only about 1/2 of what I am currently saving. I have been putting some of their work in their scrapbooks but obviously I have saved more than I will ever need for that project. Again many thanks for the wonderful ideas.

Featured Answers

Probably only keep 30 or less papers per year/per kid.

You can keep them under a bed, in a drawer or closet, or in the attic. We've used large, thick shoe/boot boxes (one that opens on one side) for storing sentimental things short-term. Attics are usually dry and safe, but over many years, papers can get brittle. Being in an absolutely air-tight container might help with that.

More Answers

I am a professional Fine Artist (with 2 small children). Storing artwork is a life long challenge for anyone.

The top challenges are acid, sunlight, moisture, extreme temperature & pests.

Most children's art is NOT done on "acid free" paper, therefor will eventually deteriorate regardless what you do. But you can extend it's life considerably if it is stored properly.

If the work is flat, like drawings and paintings, and you are storing it stacked together, then the best thing to do is put GLASSINE paper between each piece. This paper is PH balanced and is designed for this purpose. It is inexpensive & easy to find. (Michael's Crafts, or any art supply store)

I think Plastic bins are fine.
For absolute favorites, scan them & keep them digitally or have them framed professionally. A professional framer creates an air-tight seal that protects the work from moisture. You can ask to be sure UV glass is used & you will have some protection against sunlight as well.

Avoid storing in attic or basement due to moisture & temp changes. If you have little choice, go with the least moist option. (probably the attic)

Avoid hanging work in or near direct sunlight, it will fade and accelerate deterioration.

Avoid storing in cardboard boxes. Silverfish & other pests will eat the work gone. Especially if there is glue on it.

Depending on the amount of work you are storing, you can also get inexpensive paperboard portfolios with the ties on the side (great for flat storage, like under a bed) this will keep the work flat, but do not store these in attic or basement (or garage). Again, use glassine to separate the work.

Good luck, I hope this was helpful!

P : )

4 moms found this helpful

I have a friend who takes pictures of her kids projects. then uploads them to snapfish and has them put into one of their premade scrapebooks and it is awesome! They are so cool looking and space saving. Plus, their stuff is immortalized. of course, she keeps some of the stuff, but this cuts down on lots of clutter! I plan on doing this as well! However, my 4 mo doesn't do much art.good luck!!!

3 moms found this helpful

We magnet all school work to the door in the kitchen for a week and then it goes in a plastic tub on top of the refridgerator. At the end of the year I scan in our favorites to store on the computer and recycle the rest. At their birthday party's I make a slide show that plays on the t.v. as ambient background mixed in with the photographs of them growing up.

2 moms found this helpful

I bought a filing crate for each child and then bought hanging file folders (one for each year) and placed the art work/pictures/crafts in the coresponding year. At the end of the year my plan was to gift out the art work to grandparents and family and just keep a few key pieces. I can't seem to get rid of it though, I don't know which to give up! :)

1 mom found this helpful

My sister-in-law started scanning most of the pieces and only saves the "special" ones.

1 mom found this helpful

If you can scan the artwork and save it as pictures, you can upload it to a service such as snapfish and make a book out of it.

we do it one of two ways. the first is with a 3 ring binder. we get those clear protector pages and just slip the artwork in. as they get older they weed out some of the stuff so they can add new stuff. the other way we did it is to scan or take a picture of the artwork and then put it in an olnine album (you can later print them) this also works wonders with toys they have outgrown, but aren't really ready to part with. we take pictures before passing the toy onto another child and then they can always look in their books if they want to "remember" things. good luck

Try www.ShareMyKidsArt.com - I love this website! It's free and lets you store and organize your children's art. The thing I like it about the most is it has these little buttons so that you can email or upload to your facebook wall pieces of art; this is really nice for us because we live in California and my parents live in Hawaii and my wife's parents live in NY. If one of our children create something we want to share with the grandparents, we simple press a button.

The only thing is you need to scan or photograph the art, which seems like a hassle but it's actually fairly easy. Good luck!

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