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How to Teach My 4 Year Old to Read

Hi! I am looking for any advice on how to teach my daughter to read. She knows all of her letters and sounds so I thought I could give it a shot this spring/summer. She is starting kindergarten in the fall. Are there any good programs I could buy to get started???
Thanks!
C.

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Hi Carmie,
You should try the leap frog videos from target, that is a good start for phonics about putting sopunds together and then we started with the BOB books. You can find these at borders or Barnes and Noble. They are very short and color coded for different levels. For example they might start out book A level 1-- Mat sat. They progressively get harder and more challenging but with them startting out so simple it is a good sense of accomplishment for them. Hiope this Helps. By the way we are still learning my oldest is now in 1st grade and I have 2 younger ones as well but that's what worked for my oldest.
Thanks-
H. P. from Yorkville

Try this webpage: www.starfall.com. It was recommended to us by my daughter's kindergarten teacher and we really like it. Good luck!

I've heard a lot about Bob books.I didn't have a chance to use them myself, but they have different sets for each level. I know they have them at the Algonquin library. There in th e easy reader section, you can ask the librian for the Bob books.
Hope this help,
Pattie

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I read something on the internet about 5 months ago about is your child reading ready? Yes...my just turned 4 year old was...it talked about not pushing them like the others moms said...but it rec. BOB BOOKS...so off I went to ebay, and bought a like new set for 6 dollars....now my little one is reading everything she can get her hands on...I had never heard of BOB books...but tell all my friends about them now..check it out...I hope you had the luck that I did...Let me know how it goes..take care

1 mom found this helpful

My daughters also read way above grade level! I bought Hooked on Phonics, but returned it because it seemed 'dry' and did not hold their interest. Unless HOP has had a revamp since 2003 - 2004, it did not keep the attention of my daughters.

I LOVED (and so did my girls) Dick and Jane books! They taught them all of the high frequency words and once they memorize the high frequency words, we moved on to 'I Can Read It Myself' books, because they have the levels on them and they cover a wide variety of topics so I could always find ones that interested my daughters!

Good Luck!

I've heard a lot about Bob books.I didn't have a chance to use them myself, but they have different sets for each level. I know they have them at the Algonquin library. There in th e easy reader section, you can ask the librian for the Bob books.
Hope this help,
Pattie

Carmie
Our school district does a mixture of phonics and sight words. Start with small common words such as "the, it, and" etc....My daughter and son both brought little paper books home with picture sentences For example "This is my...." and following would be a picture of school, family, dog. Then they worked on phonics...knowing the sounds and sounding out words. Also, continue to read to your daughter and point at the words as you read them, they absorb a great deal. My daughter was reading before kindergarten and I think a great deal of that was dependent on my reading to her and my son and her listening to my son read his books. Good Luck!

Hi,
I haven't had a chance to read the other responses, but we like The Ordinary Parent's Guide to Teaching Reading.

Hi Carmie,
You should try the leap frog videos from target, that is a good start for phonics about putting sopunds together and then we started with the BOB books. You can find these at borders or Barnes and Noble. They are very short and color coded for different levels. For example they might start out book A level 1-- Mat sat. They progressively get harder and more challenging but with them startting out so simple it is a good sense of accomplishment for them. Hiope this Helps. By the way we are still learning my oldest is now in 1st grade and I have 2 younger ones as well but that's what worked for my oldest.
Thanks-
H. P. from Yorkville

Contact your local elementary school and find out what system or program they use. It works best if you use the same system they do. In our case, we just kept with identifying letters and "sight-words" that they should know on-sight, but didn't push it or formalize it in any way. When she got to kindergarten, they used a system called "Jolly Phonics". She got good, very fast, and is now in the top percentile in the state. We didn't do anything more than read TO her on a regular basis, point out easy words when they came along, and then followed the homework in kindergarten.

In digging around, it turns out that Jolly Phonics is a form of "synthetic" phonics. They teach the kids the letter groupings first, such as "ch" and the sound that they usually make as well as the sounds they can sometimes make. Then, slowly, they start assembling/synthesizing words out of the (suddenly obvious) sounds. This is the flip side of "analytic" phonics, where kids learn to take apart and sound out words. In a Scottish study, the kids in a synthetic phonics track shot very quickly past their analytic friends, I think perhaps a year and a half in reading fluency. By about sixth grade, it had leveled off to about 3-6 months advantage, with girls holding a higher spread than boys.

Get the BOB Books. They are great. We started our 4 year old boy about a month ago, and he's doing great! Read the reviews at Amazon.com or Barnes and Nobles. Good luck!

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