27 answers

How Do Teachers Keep from Being Sick All the Time

My son just started working in an elementary school and already has a sore throat. The children really are "in his face" since he is the speech therapist. I'm wondering what advice teachers have for him to avoid catching every little bug that is breathed on him.

What can I do next?

Featured Answers

I keep a bottle of hand sanitizer close by, every time i see a child who is sneezing, coughing I remember to sanitize my hands. since he will see diff students thru out the day He could use a wipe to sanitize the table in between students. He may have to teach kids the proper way of sneezing, blowing noses. He will still catch colds but less often and maybe he'll avoid the flu!

4 moms found this helpful

Vitamin C, plenty of sleep, eat healthy, hand washing (avoid too much sanitizer--it can be absorbed through the skin and thus make you very sick in that process itself), dress appropriately, clorox anywhere spray &/or wipes for the desks/tables, kleenex anti-viral tissues.

2 moms found this helpful

I agree with Allison, the first year you catch everything it seems like...then you become immune. :) Hand washing is a must. And I know many teachers who swore by using Airborne to get through the first year. GL!

2 moms found this helpful

More Answers

I keep a bottle of hand sanitizer close by, every time i see a child who is sneezing, coughing I remember to sanitize my hands. since he will see diff students thru out the day He could use a wipe to sanitize the table in between students. He may have to teach kids the proper way of sneezing, blowing noses. He will still catch colds but less often and maybe he'll avoid the flu!

4 moms found this helpful

Hi,
The first year in any new enviorment is a tough one for anyone, teacher or student. They are exposed to all new types of germs, etc, and until their bodies build up immunities against them, well, it's pretty much a given that they will get hit with several of them. Follow the simple suggestions posted already, the hand sanitizers or just really good hand washing works great, for the teacher AND for the students, eat well, get plenty of rest and sleep (a tough one for a new teacher I know), and take vitamins and suppliments like extra C, zinc, and a great one not mentioned yet is a good probiotic. Most of the bodies immune system is in your digestive tract, so taking a good probiotic to keep your digestion healthy will help in a BIG way. They are available at all pharmacies over the counter, and you can take once or twice a day. It really will help. Good luck! Also, he may want to restate to the parents that keeping their child home when they are ill is a policy that should be followed for the health of the entire class, as well as the teachers. Some parents just don't get the importance of this, and with the pressure of getting to their own jobs, end up sending kids to school who really have no business being there. (they give them motrin and tylenol, and cough syrup and hope that none of the teachers will notice that their child is too ill to be at school. Then the meds wear off 4 to 6 hrs later, and the kid feels horrible, and it is almost time to go home so most schools will allow the child to remian for the rest of the day unless they are vomiting. However, it is unfair to the sick child and now the germs have spread throughout the class and school, bus or wherever the child has been.) Unfortunatly, most of these viruses etc., are most contageous BEFORE the symptoms are present, but it does not mean that your son cannot take precautions. Good luck! Keeping himself healthy at all times will help his body stay healthy when these germs are going around! It will get easier in the following years.

4 moms found this helpful

The first year is the most difficult, I had strep twice that first winter. He needs to be sure to wash a lot, vitamins may help, and make sure to sanitize his room, everything that gets touched - the custodians do not necessarily do a very thorough job. He should have the kids wash when they arrive for sessions, and if they borrow a pencil or something, he should let them keep it!

3 moms found this helpful

I was sick constantly for about the first two years, then I rarely even got a cold. It's just something he'll have to endure, but he can help himself a bit. He needs a flu shot for sure, and whenever he feels like he's getting sick, he can take zinc vitamin supplements with a meal. They shorten the cold or sometimes, help avoid it altogether!

3 moms found this helpful

I agree with Allison, the first year you catch everything it seems like...then you become immune. :) Hand washing is a must. And I know many teachers who swore by using Airborne to get through the first year. GL!

2 moms found this helpful

he will get sick a lot the first year.. and as his body adjusts.. he will fight it off more.. teach him about using the cleaning stuff for hands... this will help him.. but kids always get sick the first year... and then as they get older they get better... good luck

2 moms found this helpful

He needs to wash his hands after every class. Or about once an hour...or at least use antibacterial stuff...it will help, but it won't be perfect. It takes a few years to really develop a tolerance. i got strep throat at least 2 times a year for my first 4-5 years teaching elementary school. Wash hands constantly, its the only way. Good luck!

2 moms found this helpful

Vitamin C, plenty of sleep, eat healthy, hand washing (avoid too much sanitizer--it can be absorbed through the skin and thus make you very sick in that process itself), dress appropriately, clorox anywhere spray &/or wipes for the desks/tables, kleenex anti-viral tissues.

2 moms found this helpful

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