19 answers

How Do I Get Rid of Red Bumps on My Upper Arms?

I didn't always have them, but for years I have had red dots on my upper arms - not bumbs like a rash, they don't itch or hurt or anything. I saw an article on them in Prevention once and went to a dermatologist once, which was no help (recommended micro-dermabrasion which did not help). Do/did any of you have this before? Any idea what causes it or how to get rid of it? They are dark enough that it is embarrassing to wear short sleeves or a tank top. Thank you for your help!

4 moms found this helpful

What can I do next?

So What Happened?™

Thank you all for the great advice, I am going to try several of these things and will keep you posted and let you know what works for me - for those of you that have the same problem. Thanks again! C.

Featured Answers

Actually, you have Keratosis Pilaris - it's a form of Eczema.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keratosis_pilaris

1 mom found this helpful

I used to have those too and was embarrassed, but didn't think much of them. Then I had a food allergy test done for very different symptoms. Once I eliminated those foods I was allergic to from my diet, the bumps on my arm went away. For me, the foods were corn and yeast, but I think it is very body/person specific.

I hope that is helpful information. The food allergy test I had done involved taking blood and a lab test.

Best,
Sarah

More Answers

I have red dots, some even with my skin and some raised placed randomly all over my body. I also have brown spots that are probably age spots. My dad rubbed a bleach like substance over his brown spots and they faded. At the time he used Porcelana. There are other less exensive and generic brands available now. I've read that you can use the combination of lemon juice and the sun to fade them. I don't know if red spots will respond in the same way.

When I was in my 30's my doctor referred me to a dermatologist at OHSU who was studying a condition for which red spots is a precursor when they appear in a certain pattern. I'll look up the name later. I would think the dermatologist would recognize the condition. Don't worry about that. She looked at all of my red spots and told me that they were just there. No known cause and no negative reactions to having them. They have a name which I have forgotten. They may be genetically acquired. Everyone in my family have them. My adopted daughter and her children do not.

I don't know if this will help. I'm now 66. I remember during my first half of life being self conscious about a variety of things. Around 50 I realized that everyone has differences, some of which are obvious such as discolorations on their skin and no one pays attention to what others' have unless to feel relieved that someone else has the same condition.

I grew up being told that once the backs of my upper arms became flabby and they will do so I should cover them with sleeves. In the past couple of years I've noticed famous people wearing sleeveless dresses and tops even tho their arms are flapping. I've gone back to wearing some sleeveless tops. I also have a scar on my chest that shows with some tops. At first I was self-conscious. No more. When I paid attention I saw several people my age with the same sort of scar. I now believe that the scar is just one more thing that shows that I've survived to be this age. Grey and white hair is the same. I would color my hair if I didn't have to keep up the part line which is now a big job :):):):):0) I'd rather do fun things.

Please work on not being embarrassed. Also in not even noticing them. We all have imperfections. To those of us who focus on have a good life they are unimportant.

1 mom found this helpful

I get them too, on my arms under the shirt sleeves and on my thighs. They go away if I exfoliate regularly (just in the shower, nothing special), mosturize and go sleeveless every now and then.

1 mom found this helpful

Actually, you have Keratosis Pilaris - it's a form of Eczema.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keratosis_pilaris

1 mom found this helpful

I had the same thing on my arms and backs of my legs. The dermotologist told me it is dry skin and perscribed a lotion, which is long gone but what I do now is put vitamin E oil on after I get out of the shower and it helps soooo much. I get my vitamin E oil at Trader Joes but you should be able to get it at any drug store.

I do have them! I read once that moisturizers were what was needed. Didn't work. Tried lotions with lactic acid, I think that was what it was, didn't work. Sunscreen, to not damage skin further, allergic. I've tried covering up, not fun when it's hot! I feel your pain!

Theres actually a great product by AVON, Moisture Therapy Skin Bump Minimizer, It works wonders and its fairly cheap about $8!
When I started selling AVON, I bought it as a joke for my sister (she always complained about them) and then she called and thanked me a million times because she had tried everying and this actually worked. I have sold it to quite a few people and only heard good things.

**Im not marketing myself, I was just tellng you my story!!

I have them too and I was told that it is from being dry. Try using Amlactin lotion. It is better for me, not all gone tho'..
if you get to know anything that works, please share!! :)

I used to have those too and was embarrassed, but didn't think much of them. Then I had a food allergy test done for very different symptoms. Once I eliminated those foods I was allergic to from my diet, the bumps on my arm went away. For me, the foods were corn and yeast, but I think it is very body/person specific.

I hope that is helpful information. The food allergy test I had done involved taking blood and a lab test.

Best,
Sarah

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