20 answers

Hosuebreakin a Dog

we recently bought a dog from the pound she is about 2months old. i am tryin to get some advice on how to housebreak her. anyone have any suggestions or tips.

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thank you for all the advice we weill see what happens

Featured Answers

I used a dog carrier for my dog (I got him when he was six weeks old, and is now 5 years old). You keep the dog in the carrier at night, and when you leave the house. As soon as you open the carrier door, immediately take the dog outside. He will get the message eventually. The majority of dogs do not like to soil the same area where they sleep. That is one reason the dog carrier is such a good place for them to stay at night, etc. But you also need to let them outside the same time every day. My dog goes out every morning, afternoon, and then around 9:00 pm. Never let him out of the carrier and run around the house. After a while, as soon as you open the carrier door, the dog will know to go outside and then come in to play, etc. If they ever get started using the indoors, you are doomed. Then they can smell that scent forever, no matter what you do. When you take the dog outside, always use the same command, like "go potty". Also use treats as well as praise, like "good dog". When they are still a puppy, you may also want to put the food and water bowls up and monitor when they eat and drink, until you get them house broken. Good luck!

1 mom found this helpful

My husband is a dog trainer, that is how I met him! If you have any questions or are interested in training, you can call him. David W. at ###-###-####.

1 mom found this helpful

More Answers

Are you using a crate with the puppy. If so it won't go in his own space. With my puppy we took her out every hour for days.Finally she got the hint that we were suppose to be outside to potty. The puppy pads are not very good idea. Try the outside. You can reward your dog afterwards with a treat. Just remember to watch them when they start pacing back and forth that means it is time to go outside. Good luck with the rough task........

1 mom found this helpful

You really have to crate train. The key to the crate is not to use it as punishment... Take the dog out in the morning, after every meal, before bed(crate). Put her in the crate whenever you are not home, and at bedtime. Praise your dog every single time she "goes" outside, and scold your dog every single time she "goes" inside. You also have to consider how much you leave her alone. If you are at work or out fore 6 hours, you need to reward that pup with a lot of attention, and a good walk!!! I have always had an inside dog or 2, and we have never had a dog that didn't learn!!! We don't even have the crate for our dogs anymore. They will hold it till we get home...and all my dogs have ended up that way! Good Luck

1 mom found this helpful

The only thing that worked for our two (that we also got from the Humane Society), was keeping them outside during the day. Trust me, once they are used to "going" outside, they do not want to "go" in the house. Forget newspaper or training pads or any of the like. Keep the dog in your fenced yard or in a lot and your troubles will be over.

1 mom found this helpful

I don't agree with the other comments. I have house broken 2 dogs using the puppy pads. I don't believe dogs should be caged but that is another issue entirely.... I started by placing several on the floor covering their favorite potty spots, after a day I moved them a little closer to the door, then closer still, so on and so on until we were practically hanging the pad on the door. Now don't get me wrong this was only for when we couldn't be there for the dog, you will need to watch for signals (my dogs spun in circles) and take them outside otherwise they will not learn but this was a great backup system.
Hope this helps in your house!!

1 mom found this helpful

I used a dog carrier for my dog (I got him when he was six weeks old, and is now 5 years old). You keep the dog in the carrier at night, and when you leave the house. As soon as you open the carrier door, immediately take the dog outside. He will get the message eventually. The majority of dogs do not like to soil the same area where they sleep. That is one reason the dog carrier is such a good place for them to stay at night, etc. But you also need to let them outside the same time every day. My dog goes out every morning, afternoon, and then around 9:00 pm. Never let him out of the carrier and run around the house. After a while, as soon as you open the carrier door, the dog will know to go outside and then come in to play, etc. If they ever get started using the indoors, you are doomed. Then they can smell that scent forever, no matter what you do. When you take the dog outside, always use the same command, like "go potty". Also use treats as well as praise, like "good dog". When they are still a puppy, you may also want to put the food and water bowls up and monitor when they eat and drink, until you get them house broken. Good luck!

1 mom found this helpful

I highly recommend you look up Cesar Millan online and read his book, "Cesars Way".... Anyone that has dogs needs to read this book. It will answer all your questions... I have two dogs and this guy has made my life so easy with them! Cesar Millan... get to know him!

1 mom found this helpful

Our vet suggested this, and it sounds crazy, but I promise you it worked!-- We bought a jingle bell (the kind of big ones that you see on Santa belts or whatever). We put it on a long ribbon and hung it on the door knob of the door we take the dog out to potty (have it long enough that the dog could reach it with her paw). Each time we'd carry her out we would bend down and ring the bell near her face (so she could see what we were doing). After a week or so of this she walked over to the door, reached up with her paw and rang the bell, and stood there waiting for us to take her out!

We kept this up for a while, with her ringing the bell, and eventually she didn't feel it necessary to ring the bell any more. She would just go to the door and sit and wait for us to take her out!

1 mom found this helpful

My husband is a dog trainer, that is how I met him! If you have any questions or are interested in training, you can call him. David W. at ###-###-####.

1 mom found this helpful

The best advice I have for you is what goes in must come out. I have had great luck with my dogs by letting them sleep in my room in the evenings and when I would here them rustle about I would get up and take them out, they are like children at that age you really can't expect them to hold it until the morning. I also would take the dog out immediately after eating or drinking, this seems to help them see a routine. I don't recommend puppy pads, it is hard for them to stop going in the house after they have already been allowed to. If you cannot sleep with the dog confine the dog to a small room to sleep at night. They really do not like to mess in their own area. Good luck!!!

1 mom found this helpful

crate train her. my first two dogs i didn't and they always had accidents. I crate trained my newest one and he is excellent about not going in the house

Try using housetraining pads. They are super absorbent pads that have a pheromone added to attract puppies. Lay these around your house, mainly in the areas where the puppy tends to relieve itself. I still use these for my dogs that are also trained to go outside. I leave the pads out while we are gone for the day. They work!

my mother has had great success with kennel training her poodles (4 i think)
you basically just make them sleep in a kennel at night & while you're gone during the day (if it's not terribly long) & they learn to hold it since they won't generally go where they have to sleep
i also have a friend who had success with this with a lab

I had issues when I got my dog, she didn't understand how to tell us to go out though she would go to the door. I ended up hanging a bell with a long sting on the door. Each time I let her out I would take her paw and ring the bell. Within a week she was ringing the bell. Now when we travel I can take it with me, show her where it is and she will use it.

One thing to note is 2 months is very young, I got mine at 8 weeks and for several weeks she peed everywhere.

We put a bell on the end of a piece of yarn and hung it on the door handle. We scheduled times to take the dog out like every 1/2 hour to an hour. Before we took our dog outside we would take her paw and make her ring the bell with it. Before long, she was ringing the bell to let us know she needed to go outside. Of course, we rewarded her for using going potty outside, but stopped the rewards after a while too.

We used the potty pads that you can get at Wal-Mart and our dog quickly learned that is the spot to go. If you use this method, you have to punish the dog everytime he misses the pad, by putting his nose near the mess, then immediately putting his nose on the pad. Get the pads, place your dog on the pad 1st thing when he wakes up, and after each meal time. Once he gets used to using the pads, place them closer to the door that he will exit out of to go potty. eventually move the pad outside and when he potties he will notice that he is out of the house, eventually he will begin to let you know that he has to go out

ive trained all my dogs by when i go to take them out i would first take their front paws and scratch the door and id open the door and go out w/them and when they done their bussiness id prase them (good bot /good girl) and go back in........and if by chance they had an accident i would rub their nose in it and go to the front door and take their paws and scratch the door and let them out (id go w/ them if they are young and no fenced in yard)and wait for them to go again and praise them them for that....and all of my dogs would let me know after a while that they wanted out ...they would go and scratch the door........hope this works for you........

Crates are a fantastic way to housebreak your dog. They also keep them from getting in trouble (chewing electric cords or your favorite shoes) while you are away or asleep. My hard headed Jack Russell even figured it out eventually!

I agree with the others that crate training is the way to go along with a regular schedule. You also will need to discipline the puppy when you catch him/her "in the act" of messing in the house and thoroughly praise when it is done outside. Be sure to carry some small treats outside with you so you can praise him/her and give a treat. When my puppy was housetraining, I constantly had treats in my pocket. I never used Puppy pads or newspaper so I can't say how well they work. Good Luck! I LOVE puppies!!

Buy a dog crate put him in it when you are not home and at night or an other time soeone is not holding or playing with him. When you take him out of it don't just open the door and let him run out pick him up and carry him straight outside. A dog eventualy will not mess where he sleeps so he will learn to hold it until he is out of the crate. He will not like the crate at first but he will eventually make it his lil corner of the world and even learn to go in it on his own. GOOD LUCK

I have to agree with the others on Crate, Most time they wont use bath room in crate as they dont like to soil where they sleep, but you have to take him out and take him to area you want him to use the bathroom,but a puppy cant hold it very long till he learns to control himself.
The pee pads are good once he learns to go on it, and i end up putting it by door and eventually out side.

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