22 answers

Help My Six Year Old Never Stops Talking

I have a six year old daughter that NEVER stops talking. I am with her all day, except for the two and a half hours she is at kindergarten. She wants to talk all day and wants me to listen and respond all day. By 4:00, I am ready to scream. I can not listen to her stories, questions, suggestions, great ideas and just plain old chatter all day!! What do you do? Would I be a bad mom if I tell her that she can not talk all day or do I just need to deal with and listen to her chattering from 7:00 am to 8:30 pm. I love her dearly, but I am going crazy!!!

1 mom found this helpful

What can I do next?

Featured Answers

I still haven't found the "mute button" on my almost 4 year old and am am realizing I won't find it...untill she's a teenager, clams up and never wants to talk to me again! I wrote a similar post if you search, "mute button" and I got some great answers!
Good luck!

4 moms found this helpful

What she is doing is RUDE. It's up to you to teach her that she's being rude. Everyone needs some time to be quiet and THINK. You will NOT be a bad mom if you make her develop some independent skills and close the mouth and actually do something more constructive than babble all day.

3 moms found this helpful

More Answers

Here's my answer to a similar question that was posted recently:
Haven't read all the responses, but I may have a different take on the "too much talking" thing. I have an 11 year old girl. She was always a good talker - clear, detailed, etc. I remember when it seemed she would never stop talking (maybe 3 or 4 years old? it's been a while). Being confined in the car with her for any length of time would give me a headache.

I'm of the school of thought that just because a child CAN do something (like talking every waking minute) doesn't mean they SHOULD continue to do something. At some point, I knew I wanted to teach my daughter the art of CONVERSATION which is very different from just randomly talking non-stop. One day I very nicely and gently explained to her that conversation is when you say something and then I say something related and then you say something. The person who isn't talking is listening to the other person. She was able to grasp this concept at that young age. I explained to her (again nicely) that NOBODY wants to hear someone else talk ALL DAY long and it is nice to just have quiet time. I explained that although I loved to hear what she had to say, that I wouldn't allow her to just go ON and ON about nothing. It took some practice, but she got the hang of it.

When she got a bit older, she started to notice that some kids just talked all day about nothing. She actually said to me - Mom, I'm so glad you taught me how to have a conversation because some kids just never stop talking and it's just too much noise. Honestly, I don't want her going out into the world talking everyone's ears off so why would I let her develop the habbit of talking about nothing all day? I'm going to go out on a limb and say that my teaching her this has not stopped her creativity or stunted her emotional growth in any way. I don't see anything wrong with teaching your children this - I think it will serve them well in the future. Just my 2 cents.

7 moms found this helpful

I still haven't found the "mute button" on my almost 4 year old and am am realizing I won't find it...untill she's a teenager, clams up and never wants to talk to me again! I wrote a similar post if you search, "mute button" and I got some great answers!
Good luck!

4 moms found this helpful

First suggestion: wine ;) Second, I would try and get her to adhere to one hour of alone quiet play time a day where she can read, play toys, whatever in her room alone so you can get some sanity. Get a timer and when it goes off, she can start the chatting again. Good luck

3 moms found this helpful

What she is doing is RUDE. It's up to you to teach her that she's being rude. Everyone needs some time to be quiet and THINK. You will NOT be a bad mom if you make her develop some independent skills and close the mouth and actually do something more constructive than babble all day.

3 moms found this helpful

there's not an easy answer. i don't agree that teaching a child the art of conversation will stifle her creativity, and i also don't think that just tuning a child like this out is appropriate. when a child is ignored routinely, they learn that ignoring someone else in a conversation is par for the course and learn to become one of those awful people who don't consider conversation a mutual exercise, but only look at other people as Giant Ears.
i think you can work with a talkative child about conversational manners just as you teach them other points of courtesy. in ADDITION to this (not instead of), declare certain times 'quiet times' where everyone just thinks and doesn't talk out loud. depending on what your sanity requirements are, this could either be for one hour each in the morning, afternoon and evening, or for 10 minutes out of each hour (which would probably be more do-able for a little.)
you are entitled to a little peace! just work with with her on it.
:) khairete
S.

3 moms found this helpful

Im laughing. This 3 1/2 yr old grand daughter can talk like crazy and is relentless in her questions. What makes her so unique is she tells us what to say back to her. Its as if she wrote the script and we have to follow it word for word or she gets upset. I can tune it out easy,, no problem when shes talking nonstop, but, when she wants you to follow her script you are in trouble. If I dont answer she gets ticked, and lets me know. Beleive me I have worked on this for well over a year now and she still has a tough time letting us say what we want and not answer if we dont want. She has her moments of quiet when she will look at books or play with toys just wonderfully. But it never fails,, she comes back with "hey grama, you be the M. dinosaur and I am the baby and now you say "hi baby, how are you?" "say it grama, just say hi baby how are you?".. I love it,,but yeah,, it can get to be too much.

3 moms found this helpful

I used to tell my daughter that we were entering a quiet zone (she couldn't read the road signs yet). I told her we had to be quiet until we left the quiet zone. It worked for 2-3 years. A few years back, on a numbingly cold day (I was visiting my parents), my car died. My parents got it into their favorite mechanic to get fixed, but I wasn't able to drive home until evening. I was stressed out driving and my little chatterbox was going at it. I finally asked her not to talk out loud for awhile .... and she was quiet for a few minutes and then said 'M.? My head hurts!'.

3 moms found this helpful

Hi there,

I'm in the same boat. My four year old wants to ask questions all day-- but these aren't interesting, because these are questions he already knows the answer to. "Was Tyranosaurus Rex a meat eater?" (hell, yeah!) "Did diplodicus die? Did triceratops die? ("Dude, they all died. Every single dinosaur died.Millions of years ago.") "Can we eat dinosaur meat?" ....notice a theme?

If I did not actively ignore my son, I would go crazy. I listen for when he asks "interesting questions" (questions he hasn't asked a million times), and then stop and answer those.

What I have found works for me is to sometimes say "You know, right now, Mama needs to think about X (washing dishes, cooking, whatever it is you want to do), and so I'm going to be quiet for a while. If you want to keep talking, you can play (over there, bedroom, living room). I'll let you know when I'm ready to talk again."

There's something to be said for teaching kids context. As I said, I've been through this with my son. His habit of introducing "done to death" topics with his preschool peers has been met with some exclusion. I even heard another child tell him, rolling their eyes "We know that already. You always tell us that." Made me sad, but made me understand MY part in his habit of doing this. I love Kiddo so much, and realized that my answering/indulging these repetitive questions was actually setting a bad example for him.

Is yours by chance an "only"? I ask this because mine is, and my experience is that only children are answered a lot more, mainly because when they are home with us, it's just us and them. When they talk, we assume they are talking to us.

I hope it gets better and don't feel badly for being frustrated. I know that if I hear "Did plant eaters eat meat eaters?" again and again, I might go nuts too.

3 moms found this helpful

1 / 3
Required Fields

Our records show that we already have a Mamapedia or Mamasource account created for you under the email address you entered.

Please enter your Mamapedia or Mamasource password to continue signing in.

Required Fields

, you’re almost done...

Since this is the first time you are logging in to Mamapedia with Facebook Connect, please provide the following information so you can participate in the Mamapedia community.

As a member, you’ll receive optional email newsletters and community updates sent to you from Mamapedia, and your email address will never be shared with third parties.

By clicking "Continue to Mamapedia", I agree to the Mamapedia Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.