39 answers

Has Anyone Tried the Gluten Free Diet?

I was thinking about trying the gluten free diet for my son. I have heard it can do wonders for kids with Autism. I'm worried because he is such a picky eater, and he does not do good with change.

However if it will help him i am more than willing to try it. I was wondering if anyone has or is trying it? If so how is it working out? Do you eat the same food your child eats? I'm just full of questions!

What can I do next?

Featured Answers

1 in 124 people have celiac disease and have to be on a gluten free diet. I am one of them and I can tell you that once you learn what is involved in eating gluten free it just becomes a lifestyle change. It will take time, a few months to learn. For example, soy sauce contains wheat so you need to avoid that. Therefore teryaki chicken or fried rice is off limits. Rice Krispies contain malt which is from barley which is off limits. Once you get it though it is easy to change.
My kids do not have the disease but they eat my gluten free cereal, gluten free waffles, pancakes, crackers etc. You can buy a lot from trader joes and whole foods.
There are lots of gluten free cookbooks out there too.
Hope my 2 cents helped. Good luck!

Hi H.,

Absolutely, H.. I work with diet for children with autism. The gluten (wheat) and casein (dairy)-free diet can work wonders. One of the reason for picky eating is because certain children (many with autism and PDD) convert gluten and casein to opiates - this is like being on morphine and children become very addicted and restrictive in their diet to only eating wheat and dairy containing foods. So you are not alone, most children I've seen with autism/PDD are picky eaters but if you do the diet you will see they begin to open up their food choices. It is "doable."

I've seen it really help - stories from clients of children gaining language (from less foggy thinking), less diarrhea/constipation (which are very common from these inflammatory foods), and generally feeling better. Autism Research Institute polled thousands of parents and showed that gluten/casein-free diet has a 65% benefit rating. See http://autism.com/treatable/form34qr.htm

Often the whole family will do the same diet. Contact me with more questions.

Please let me know what you find out. I have a 3 year old son who has been diagnosed with ADHD. I have wondered lately if he has been diagnosed correctly. My son is also a very picky eater. We have the hardest time getting him to eat, let alone try new foods. I have been wondering about the effects of nutrition on his behavior, and if changing his diet would help. The problem would be in getting him to eat the new food.

Thanks.
Chris

More Answers

Hi H.,

I did do the glutten free diet with my son when he was young.
He had allergies. Now they have many products in health stores
I brought a bread maker and the bulk ingredients at Whole Foods
You need to start reading labels and add the glutten free food in place of the other gradually. I recommend toasting the bread,my son did do well on this diet. He is now 21 and although eats wheat now he watches how much and knows when he has OD on it, and cuts back.
Lots of good recipes on the internet. Maybe he can help pick some out to try.

Good Luck,
S.

Dear H.,

Have you ever heard of a product called 'MaxGXL'? My friend has an 8 year old son with Autism. He never spoke. Just grunted at best. Anyway, she gave him some Max and within 24 hours he was saying words! Withing 2 days he was saying sentences and now 2 weeks later he's a chatter box!!! She and I both use www.maxgxl.com/maxmagic now to get our MaxGXL from. Also if you're in Redding tonight (Th) there's going to be a free class on Health & Wellness with the guest speaker is Dr. Steven Davis. AND Dr. Davis will be speaking about Autism too.

If you want to know more about this class let me know and I will look for the flyer so I can tell you more.

Hope this helps!
N. :o)

Hi H.,

Absolutely, H.. I work with diet for children with autism. The gluten (wheat) and casein (dairy)-free diet can work wonders. One of the reason for picky eating is because certain children (many with autism and PDD) convert gluten and casein to opiates - this is like being on morphine and children become very addicted and restrictive in their diet to only eating wheat and dairy containing foods. So you are not alone, most children I've seen with autism/PDD are picky eaters but if you do the diet you will see they begin to open up their food choices. It is "doable."

I've seen it really help - stories from clients of children gaining language (from less foggy thinking), less diarrhea/constipation (which are very common from these inflammatory foods), and generally feeling better. Autism Research Institute polled thousands of parents and showed that gluten/casein-free diet has a 65% benefit rating. See http://autism.com/treatable/form34qr.htm

Often the whole family will do the same diet. Contact me with more questions.

Hi H.-
I am currently eating that way myself to try to help my son's reflux (I'm nursing). It's a bit difficult to get used to, but well worth it. There are cookie mixes & brownies & other gluten free goodies out there. Whole Foods has some- even Trader Joes has them now. It helps me to have a treat to get thru with out the bread & crackers etc.
HTH & Good Luck

WE have 2 young kids with food allergies and one is allergic to not only wheat but all grains including rice (breaks out in hives and vomits for hours). So we have had no choice but to go not only gluten-free, but grain-free for him. But i have heard that it can be really healthy for anyone to try. I've always been a bread eater myself but have found it not to be as difficult as i thought to avoid, at least for dinner (we try to all eat the same thing when possible). We eat a lot of potates and quinoa. There are a lot of great recipe books out now on the subject and on the internet. I don't know about the autism-connection but i'm sure there's info out there. Good luck to you and your family.

Please let me know what you find out. I have a 3 year old son who has been diagnosed with ADHD. I have wondered lately if he has been diagnosed correctly. My son is also a very picky eater. We have the hardest time getting him to eat, let alone try new foods. I have been wondering about the effects of nutrition on his behavior, and if changing his diet would help. The problem would be in getting him to eat the new food.

Thanks.
Chris

Hi H.,
I have heard good things about the gluten/casien free diet. I do not have autism in my children. I wanted to post a web site you might like to look at: www.mannarelief.org click the hope program. They are a Christian ministry that helps children with medical issues and children in orphanages. My family is involved with fund raising for them as it is our favorite charity. We have friends with children who have been blessed so much by Mannarelif.
~ S.

I have a friend who's grandson is allergic to a lot of different foods and also has a form of autism. She makes a lot of gluten free foods for him. I think it would be a great idea for the whole family to try the diet. It will be hard on your son to be "left out" and be the only one on this diet. As with any diet you will have foods you will miss, but it is a very good diet and could benefit the whole family. There is a book Gluten Free for Dummies and a website Glutensolutions.com. Give these a look and see what you think. I know the foods can be somewhat expensive and you will probably have to try them all to seee what your son likes or not. If you like to cook and have the time to try new recipes out you might have a good time trying everything. I have tried a few of the things my friend has made and they are delicious! She has a recipe for a zuchini cake and sugar cookies that are very good, and I know she has recipes for breads too.

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