37 answers

Garage Sales - What to Charge

I have been re-washing all of these clothes that I have been storing and decided to get them out of the house (with the help of nagging husband). I have no clue on what to charge for sleepers, pants, onsies, little outfits and such. Most sizes are from 6mos to 18mos. I would love to make a small profit to help put gas in the tank, but I also just want to get rid of them.

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What can I do next?

Featured Answers

I think the best way to get rid of clothes at a garage sale is to charge by the bagful. I usually provide grocery bags and charge $5 or $10 a bag depending on what kind of clothes I'm selling (sleepers, bibs and such should probably be about $5... If you've got designer stuff or Osh Kosh, Baby Gap, or Gymboree you could charge more.) If you nickel and dime everything then people will be a lot more choosy and you'll end up with a lot of clothes at the end to donate to Goodwill - plus it means you'll spend a lot more time pricing each item. Good luck!

2 moms found this helpful

If you just want to get rid of them, I suggest 50 cents for the onesies, $1 for non-name brand items and $3 for brand name. You might have better luck selling things as a bunch on Craig's List - garage sale folks are usually looking for really cheap stuff. Or, you could donate half to charity and sell half!

Good luck - I hear you on filling the gas tank!!!

2 moms found this helpful

I'd recommend nothing more than a dollar for the nicest things. Most people charge 25 - 50 cents depending on the item.
Good luck!

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More Answers

As a general rule you can charge more for the better brands (gap, gymboree, janie and jack, hanna, european brands, good condition robeez, stride rite, etc.)

I would charge .50-$1.50 for each piece, $1-4 for the good ones, no more than $5-10 for coats, costumes, shoes. For toys I'd put the smaller ones in boxes with .25, .50, $1 on the box front, then bigger toys priced separately.

We've been "yard saling" a lot recently and this is what I've seen, plus what I'd price my stuff at. Good luck!

2 moms found this helpful

You have some great advice and I just wanted to add one thing. Make sure your garage sale is on a Friday. The first one I did we weren't going to do that and my friend said I had to because that's when I'd make the most money and she was right. We sold 2/3 of our stuff on the Friday then some on Saturday and didn't even do it on Sunday. Hope this helps.

Good Luck.

2 moms found this helpful

I had a huge estate sale last November and all I can say is sell it cheap. Even if you may think it's worth a lot of money all garage salers including myself will not pay big money for anything. If you think the item is truely worth money set it aside and check ebay and craigslist to get prices. Good luck with the sale.

2 moms found this helpful

If you just want to get rid of them, I suggest 50 cents for the onesies, $1 for non-name brand items and $3 for brand name. You might have better luck selling things as a bunch on Craig's List - garage sale folks are usually looking for really cheap stuff. Or, you could donate half to charity and sell half!

Good luck - I hear you on filling the gas tank!!!

2 moms found this helpful

I think the best way to get rid of clothes at a garage sale is to charge by the bagful. I usually provide grocery bags and charge $5 or $10 a bag depending on what kind of clothes I'm selling (sleepers, bibs and such should probably be about $5... If you've got designer stuff or Osh Kosh, Baby Gap, or Gymboree you could charge more.) If you nickel and dime everything then people will be a lot more choosy and you'll end up with a lot of clothes at the end to donate to Goodwill - plus it means you'll spend a lot more time pricing each item. Good luck!

2 moms found this helpful

Hi T.,

You might try heading to a couple nearby children/babies resale shops or to Goodwill or another thrift store to get an idea. Or, cruise around to other yard sales the weekend before your sale.

Checking pricing on Craigslist and eBay might help you as well. When we sold my oldest daughter's Gameboy, we checked both sites, as well as called Game Crazy to see what they go for.

Also, head to the library and see if they have a guide to pricing for yard sales. I know such a thing exists because I read about it in one of Mary Hunt's articles, but I can't find the article to share with you. Ask at the reference desk and see if they can tell you where it would be.

Yard sales are a tricky thing. I had several yard sales when we were stationed in El Paso, sold nearly everything, and got some decent money. But when I had sales on Ft Leonard Wood and Ft. Knox, I didn't have very good luck. I have no idea what factors influence sales, but maybe try different times of month. Once at the beginning and once in the middle. Or, try and get together a community sale. I think more people would come to one of those because there's more variety. Of course that means attention diverted from you, but more people to look might mean better sales.

Hope this helps you and your sale is a complete hit! :o)

K. W

2 moms found this helpful

I know you're asking about selling them, but I wanted to point out how great a tax right-off is for donations. If you own a home you should be able to itemize your deductions each year. We have saved HUNDREDS off our taxes by donating clothing and other items. Plus, you're doing a great thing by donating them so people in need get a great deal. :-)

You can use "It's Deductable" online (part of TurboTax - whether or not you use Turbo Tax to prepare your annual taxes) for FREE. You easily fill in the items you donated and it fills out you the price allowed to deduct (and the prices are MUCH higher than you could ever sell them for at a garage sale). Then you can print out the form for your taxes. We've always gotten about 1/3 back of the appraised amount back as money off our taxes. I've done this for quite a few years after dealing with a couple pain-in-the-butt yard sales. In fact, there have been one or two years that it meant the difference of a rebate vs. owing money. You have to wait until tax time to reap the monetary rewards, but you feel great right away by donating them to others in need. :-D

2 moms found this helpful

It depends if you need money right now for gas or if you can wait until the taxman commeth. Because the reality is - if you make a clear concise itemized list and rate their quality from poor to near new condition and then donate them to Goodwill, you will probably "make" more in deductions when next April comes around. This way you don't have to deal with someone saying, "I'll give you 10 cents when all you were asking for was 50 cents - and the reality is your deduction would have been a $1.15.

2 moms found this helpful

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