12 answers

Fleas in Basement--solutions??

We have a flea problem in our basement. We are treating our cat with Advantage and keeping him out of the basement, which has a concrete floor and stone walls. (He is a totally indoor cat, so I'm puzzled by why we even have fleas.) I'm confident that the cat and our main living space are both fairly flea-free. We are vacuuming a lot.

But the basement remains a problem. My husband thinks we should send our cat into the basement right after treating him with Advantage so that the adult fleas will bite him and die. (We are concerned about using an insecticide that our young children could be exposed to.) I'm not comfortable with this idea--using the cat as bait. Plus, I wouldn't be comfortable letting him into our main living space again after spending time down there. My husband says he could give him a bath after being in the basement. To me, that sounds totally absurd. I envision the cat running wildly through the house dripping all over the place--a disaster I don't want to clean up. Has anyone tried this, or other solutions? I'm interested in success stories as well as cautionary tales. Thanks!

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So What Happened?™

Thanks so much for all your thoughts. I'm especially grateful for the diatomaceous earth suggestion. We just bought a bag and are going to spread it throughout the basement. We're seeing fewer fleas down there with the cooler weather, and I'm hopeful the DE will help curb an explosion in the spring. A flea bomb will be our last resort. Thanks again!

Featured Answers

All the adult fleas aren't going to jump on the cat. You'll have to do it over and over and over...

Put a flea bomb in the basement. Then do it again in 10 days because the eggs will have hatched and the second generation needs to be killed.

Sorry - it's better than continuing to be bitten.
D.

1 mom found this helpful

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Have you looked up more natural solutions on the internet? One year we used a combination of salt and Borax (soap) spread over the carpet. It did the trick as a natural fix. From what I remember is supposed to dry out the fleas. We also on occasion we spread Diatomaceous Earth around the outside perimeter of our house. The DE cuts up the bodies of insects making it hard for them to survive.

We have never used a flea bomb in the house as I do not want my children or myself to be exposed to that type of chemical. Yes, we still get fleas mostly because there are squirrels all over our neighborhood. Just keep up on the vacuuming and combing the cat. I have found we only need the Advantage once year, in a really bad bug year.

1 mom found this helpful

All the adult fleas aren't going to jump on the cat. You'll have to do it over and over and over...

Put a flea bomb in the basement. Then do it again in 10 days because the eggs will have hatched and the second generation needs to be killed.

Sorry - it's better than continuing to be bitten.
D.

1 mom found this helpful

Fleas don't live long in a house where there is no host for blood--are you sure they are not gnats?

Gnats--pour water & bleach down all floor drains once per day for several days.

Fleas-- Treat your cat--remove him/her from the house. Bomb the house.

We had a massive flea problem in the basement and the only, ONLY thing that got rid of them was hiring Terminex. They would come out whenever I called them - sometimes 3 to 4 times a WEEK, and you just pay the flat yearly bill ($300 I think). Worth every penny!

Hmm. A puzzling problem. If the cat's not getting out, the fleas have got to be coming in from somewhere.
I'd clear around the outside edges of your house. Trim back vegetation, cut grass very short, keep wood piles (if any) away from the house. Eliminate hiding places which give bugs/critters an excuse to come close. Spray around the outside perimeter of your house.

You have received a lot of good suggestions on how to get rid of them. It's true that you need a 2-pronged solution (fleas, and then the remaining eggs). As for the source - there is a bumper crop of acorns this year and so squirrels are frantically gathering them. One may have worked his way into your basement - it's pretty easy. Same with chipmunks. The other source is a field mouse - they are unbelievable at flattening their bodies and entering a house along a joist or along a pipe - like where the water goes out from the basement to the outdoor spigot. As the nights cool down, animals may get in the basement looking for a warm place to build a nest for the winter. The fleas are happy with any warm-blooded host, and they are good at jumping onto a cat or a human. For the squirrels, look for a hole anywhere about 1.5 inches across. For the mice, forget it - you can't mouse-proof the house, only get rid of the ones you have.

You can try the natural solutions mentioned or consult an exterminator who uses environmentally-friendly (and child-friendly) solutions. Sometimes the exterminators can spot the source of the problem by identifying entrance holes, small amounts of damage you can't spot, or droppings. But definitely do something!

If no one is going in the basement it may sound like an over simple solution, but this really works, set out a pan with water and a bit of dish soap in it, then shine a light ( like a small flashlight near the bowl. They are attracted to the heat from the light and will drown in the water...although I have to say I have never heard of fleas in just one area of the house before, if you have fleas...you have fleas.

We had the same issue. Set off a bug bomb (or two depending on the size of your basement) and the fleas should be gone. Just go to the park, or go run errands while its going. My problem was so bad I had to bomb twice, but it worked.

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