19 answers

Does Hair Really Grow Faster If You Cut It?

My daughter is 15 months old and I really want her to have long hair so I haven't cut it. I was wondering if I cut it will it grow faster or is that an old wives tale?

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It's a myth. If a hair has a split end, the split will continue up the shaft. So trimming a split end off keeps the damage from traveling up. Good nutrition will make hair grow longer, stronger and healthier (within the bounds of genetics - each of us has an ultimate terminal length which we can not grow beyond. It's very long for some people while other people can't grow it past their shoulders).

1 mom found this helpful

The reason people think/say that is because if you have split ends or damaged hair it will continue to break off and appear to not really be growing. Even though new hair continues to grow at the root, the length will not increase much because it continues to break. Trimming off the most damaged part of the hair will keep it from breaking so much. With such a young child I don't think it would make a difference since her hair is not exposed to the products and heat that many adults use on their hair, therefore her hair should be quite healthy. I don't think my daughter got her first cut until she was 3 or 4.

1 mom found this helpful

More Answers

Think about it-- your hair grows from the root. How could cutting off the dead ends make it grow faster from the roots? Old wives tale. Your hair looks healthier when you trim off the split ends so it seems like it grew faster-- that's why I think people say that

2 moms found this helpful

The reason people think/say that is because if you have split ends or damaged hair it will continue to break off and appear to not really be growing. Even though new hair continues to grow at the root, the length will not increase much because it continues to break. Trimming off the most damaged part of the hair will keep it from breaking so much. With such a young child I don't think it would make a difference since her hair is not exposed to the products and heat that many adults use on their hair, therefore her hair should be quite healthy. I don't think my daughter got her first cut until she was 3 or 4.

1 mom found this helpful

The reason why people say that is if you don't cut your hair for such a long time that the ends are completely dead you will have to cut them all off and your hair will end up being considerably shorter.

Your best bet is to give her a trim every 2-3 months to keep the splitends/deadends under control.

1 mom found this helpful

It's a myth. If a hair has a split end, the split will continue up the shaft. So trimming a split end off keeps the damage from traveling up. Good nutrition will make hair grow longer, stronger and healthier (within the bounds of genetics - each of us has an ultimate terminal length which we can not grow beyond. It's very long for some people while other people can't grow it past their shoulders).

1 mom found this helpful

Hair grows faster in the summer and slower in the winter.

All hair has a life expectancy, and when that particular folicle reaches that "time" the peice of hair then dies and falls out. Hence, some people will never get hair past a certain length, even if they never cut their hair (like me).Mine never gets any longer than about 5 inches past my shoulder.

Biotin ( a b vitamin) is good for growing hair. Probiotics feed the biotin in your stomach. perhaps taking accidophilus or lactobaccilus can help increase your stomach biotin.

1 mom found this helpful

It is not true at all. When you cut a childs hair, even if you SHAVE it BALD, it only grows back courser.

If you cut it, it simply grows healthier and stronger..not sure about faster!

I was very disappointed to read this bc I cut my daughters hair bc she had the baby mullet hopeing it growns in better :D

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