19 answers

Do Your Kids Have to Go to Sleep with the Tv On??

I posted a question yesterday about my daughter staying in her own bed to sleep well last night we had a good night she got up once my husband put her back to bed and she was there when I got up this morning so I'm bribing her with if she does it the rest of the week she can get a $1 item from target but was wondering if any of your kids have to sleep with the tv on?? My husband can't fall asleep unless it is on so wondering if she is going to be like her father>

What can I do next?

Featured Answers

I am happy she did so well last night.
We rented a house that had squirrels living in the attic. My daughter was scared from the noise and we let her have the tv on. We finally moved and it took months to brake her from them tv!
We started putting on her favorite music instead.
Tv works great, but it can back fire. You have to decide if trading one thing for another is worth it. If it is, then go for it. Maybe you could set the sleep timer on the tv for a specific amount of time and when it goes off, its off for the night.
I hope you have many more sucessful nights!

1 mom found this helpful

She will not be just like her father unless you allow her to fall asleep with the TV on.
Try this, put a small fan in her room for noise. I sleep with a small fan on in my room. It helps me to go to sleep.

More Answers

It's a bad habit to get into, but it can be broken. Try using a light radio station or a fan instead.

I need some type of circulation or light sound, so I have a fan running on low at night. But sleeping with a tv on can be difficult, some shows may be loud, others may be quiet, so after the quiet if a loud noise comes on it can wake her back up. Also, being dependent on a tv for sound can't be healthy, here's some research on the subject:

When there's light, your pituitary gland produces saratonin, when it's dark, it produces melatonin which is what makes you sleep. The light from the TV can make you produce less melatonin resulting in troubles sleeping.

The correlation between sleep and the TV on is simpler than that- too much noise to get deep REM sleep, and the eyes pick up the flickering movements of flashy lights. Turning off the TV does not save melatonin, it's just a good idea. (Although, many people swear by the "white noise" of the TV, and the comfort of background noise helps some people feel as if they are not alone in the house, and sleep better as a result... go figure!

All of that aside, we won't have tv's in our rooms either, so much research has been done that it can be distracting and confining and unhealthy but that's up to each family.

The New York Times reports on several disturbing statistics connecting televisions in the bedroom to health and developmental problems like obesity, insomnia, and more. The article focuses on the effects of the bedroom TV on kids (who see lower test scores and are at a higher risk of smoking), but we've also seen how electronic media can hinder a good night's sleep for adults, as well.

2 moms found this helpful

I am happy she did so well last night.
We rented a house that had squirrels living in the attic. My daughter was scared from the noise and we let her have the tv on. We finally moved and it took months to brake her from them tv!
We started putting on her favorite music instead.
Tv works great, but it can back fire. You have to decide if trading one thing for another is worth it. If it is, then go for it. Maybe you could set the sleep timer on the tv for a specific amount of time and when it goes off, its off for the night.
I hope you have many more sucessful nights!

1 mom found this helpful

We have a radio in our sons room and leave the hall light on for when he goes to sleep. Before I go to bed I turn off the hall light. He is afraid of the dark. He has little LED nightlights too. We have a tv in our room and fall asleep with it on for sound and light - I need it on because of the dark issue too.

1 mom found this helpful

Nope. And I will never allow my son to fall asleep in front of the television because he won't ever have one in his room. To be honest, we rarely turn on our TV, especially now that the weather is becoming warmer and the days are longer. We'd much rather be outside!

Watching the television stimulates a child and does the exact opposite of what you want for your daughter to do - go to sleep! Turn off the TV and set up a solid, comforting bedtime routine. Quiet games, bath/shower, reading books, telling stories, singing songs, etc. Reinforce the importance of her staying in her own room and stick to it.

And one other suggestion (I didn't read your other question, so I apologize I offer similar advice)... my parents never allowed my brothers or me to sleep in their bed once we were past the toddler stage. They had a sleeping bag that they kept in their room for times when we had a bad dream or didn't want to go back to our rooms. We didn't sleep on their floor very often - it was much more comfortable to be in our own beds!

Good luck to you!

1 mom found this helpful

No my kids don't.
I don't even plan on putting any in their rooms when they are older.

As the previous poster said, it is a learned "habit."

I sleep with the TV on but neither of my kids do.
It is a bit of a habit for me, but I hear every creak, every rain drop, every time someone starts a car, every dog barking...having the TV on low helps drown that out. I usually put it in PBS because there are no commercials or anything and it helps me sleep.
My kids can sleep through earthquakes so nothing bothers them.
I don't think it's an inherited habit unless you turn it in to one.
My son is 14 and on the weekends, he's alwlays saying that he's going to stay up late to watch this or that. I don't even argue with him. He's out by 9:30 and I just turn the TV off.

Good luck with your daughter staying in her bed!
I know some parents really struggle with that.
As she gets better, let her pick a new pillow or blanket that she's only allowed to have in her room for bedtime. Not even for couch cozey-ing until she's consistantly sleeping in her own room.

Best wishes!

No, I think it is learned behavior. My girls have to be "resting or reading" in their beds at bedtime. They don't have a TV in their rooms. If they did, I know it would be a disaster. My youngest, especially, loves her media, so limits are essential. However, if they go to bed nicely on school nights, they can listen to the radio or listen to a book on CD in bed before falling asleep when it isn't a school night. Or, my youngest, sometimes wants to watch a movie in the basement rec room, and sleep on the couch afterwards. Again, she only gets to do that only weekends if bedtime on school nights goes smoothly.

My daughter is almost 7 and to get her to go to sleep I turn on her TV in her room at bedtime. During the week I will put in a 30 min. video (not a DVD because it will play over and over again). However I do not let her have any sound, so she uses it more as a night light. Her screen is blue when the movie is done. However on the weekends or non school nights she can have a long movie and sound. It depends on what night it is and if her brother is quiet as to how long it takes her to go to bed. I know that I am a night owl as is my son. So if she is taking so long to go to sleep that could even be the problem or she might think that she is missing out on something.

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