48 answers

Crayon off the Walls?

My awesome artist has drawn all over the hallway with crayon. Soap and sponges does not work. I would rather not go buy magic erasers and was hoping some of you would have a more crafty approach to cleaning crayon from paint. Thanks in advance!

2 moms found this helpful

What can I do next?

Featured Answers

use a hair dryer to soften it. then clean it off with any of the following

WD-40 and a clean cloth
dryer sheets
baby wipes
baby oil and a clean cloth
magic eraser.

2 moms found this helpful

Just use white toothpaste and a toothbrush and elbow grease :-). It works- we do it all the time, with no damage to the paint!!! Try it!!!

1 mom found this helpful

I know you wanted a more crafty or inexpensive solution, but I just wanted to say that magic eraser type sponges are available at the dollar store. ;)

More Answers

WD-40 on a rag works wonders. The just wash off with a little soap and water.

2 moms found this helpful

use a hair dryer to soften it. then clean it off with any of the following

WD-40 and a clean cloth
dryer sheets
baby wipes
baby oil and a clean cloth
magic eraser.

2 moms found this helpful

Dear S.,
I don't know why you are opposed to Magic Erasers. I am so glad they invented them. They can be cut so you don't have to use a whole one at a time. My son and his friends are always getting fingerprints and scuff marks and Lord knows what else all over my white front door. I tried Windex, 409, cleanser...all it did was start taking the paint off. The Magic Erasers work like...well...Magic. Everything comes off, but the paint stays on. I also use them to wipe down the bathroom walls because I always leave the window open and with the steam of the shower, etc, it cleans the walls right up. There are no fumes, they don't irritate my skin, they work great.
My kids were both "artists" as well. So, I invested in an easel for them. It wasn't very expensive. One side was a chalkboard and it came with an eraser. The other side could be used with "dry" markers. That side had a tray at the bottom for paints and brushes, etc. It also came with paper and clips so they could crayon, chalk or paint as much as they wanted. I got plastic table cloths at the dollar store to put under it to keep paints off the floors or the driveway. They actually loved doing artwork outside. I still have some of their paintings.
There is nothing wrong with fostering a love for being creative and artistic, but the walls are not the place to do it. Your girl has a birthday coming up and Christmas is around the corner. An easel would be a wonderful thing to give her. My kids loved wearing one of their dad's old button down shirts with the sleeves rolled up. When they are that little, it covers their regular clothes. You can take her to a second hand store and let her pick out her own "art shirt". Something that won't matter how painty or marked up or chalky it gets.
I think if she has to help you clean her mess, she will be less likely to do it again. But get her an easel and let her go for it.

2 moms found this helpful

Just use white toothpaste and a toothbrush and elbow grease :-). It works- we do it all the time, with no damage to the paint!!! Try it!!!

1 mom found this helpful

why not get the magic erasers??? they really work and you only have to use half of it at a time...i cut them in half, so they last longer. because you know the kids will "decorate" the walls again! the only other thing i've tried that sort of works is dawn dishwashing liquid...the grease cutting gets most of the crayon off with alittle scrubbing. just don't scrub too hard...or you'll take off some paint too! good luck.
your pal, L. s.

1 mom found this helpful

Have you tried using white tooth paste or a paste of baking soda and water? Scrub on with a finger nail brush, then rinse with a wet rag.

I remember my mom using toothpaste to get crayon off the wall, but really, the magic erasers are the way to go.

I am surprised to see only one person responded with the hairdryer trick. I have used that trick and it works great.

1 / 3
Required Fields

Our records show that we already have a Mamapedia or Mamasource account created for you under the email address you entered.

Please enter your Mamapedia or Mamasource password to continue signing in.

Required Fields

, you’re almost done...

Since this is the first time you are logging in to Mamapedia with Facebook Connect, please provide the following information so you can participate in the Mamapedia community.

As a member, you’ll receive optional email newsletters and community updates sent to you from Mamapedia, and your email address will never be shared with third parties.

By clicking "Continue to Mamapedia", I agree to the Mamapedia Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.