8 answers

Condensation Around Windows in Cold Weather

I have a problem in my house (2 years old) with condensation building up around the bottom of the windows when the weather gets cold. We have an in house humidifier which has been adjusted for the temperature. If I dry the windows the condesation just comes back within a few minutes. This caused one of the wood windows frames to warp last year and I had to constantly dry the windows to prevent mold. Has anyone else had the same problem and how did you fix it? Are there any products that I can put on my windows to prevent this?

Thanks,
K.

1 mom found this helpful

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More Answers

Your house humidifier should be turned down when the temp outside decreases. If the temp outside is above 20 degrees it should be set at 40% humidity. For every 10 degrees colder outside decrease the humidity by 5%. So if 30 degrees outside set humidity at 35% and so on. If you're already doing this have your humidifier checked

2 moms found this helpful

Hi K.,

We have the same problem! My husband is a Project Consultant for The Home Depot and specializes in windows... he said that our windows are "builder grade" windows, the cheapest that they have! So, they are not well insulated. We actually get ice on the INSIDE of the windows!

If you want a free estimate email me back!

Good Luck and stay warm!
C.

1 mom found this helpful

Hi K.,
We bought a house with a humidifier about 5 years ago, and we have the same problem. We called the builder, and he said that you just have to turn down the humidifier. I love the humidifier so the air is not dry and static-y, but we have had to keep turning it down until the condensation disappears from the windows. The first year we were in the house, we did not do this, and we have some permanent staining on one wood window, and some water damage from condensation on a "cathedral" type ceiling. It's a bummer, but we have just had to keep the house a little on the dry side to prevent this from happeneing again. Good luck, and hope this helps out! J. :-)

1 mom found this helpful

K.,

This actually means that your windows are working well, air is not escaping, with the moisture. I had a condo that had this problem, although I had metal windows. I would actually have ice every morning in the winter. I had the humidifier on my heater turned off as well. I had no vents outside though, so when I cooked it got really bad and I couldn't see out of the windows. The only solution I found was to crack a window when I cooked to allow the moist air out of the condo. This did not solve the problem though, just helped some. Do you have a vent in you attic or anywhere in your house for the moist air to escape?

K.,

I am having the same problem! we rehooked up our last week and I am finding the same issue - even when we dial down the humidifier.
If you dont mind letting me know if you find out anything usefull - Thanks!!

I am in a 2-3 year old house as well too. And our humidifier IS turned all the way down and it still happens. I don't get it. Some of it makes sense... some windows are buy heating vents so it will happen. Or when the blinds are closed... it'll be worse. But it just doesn't seem right to me. And I am worried about eventual damage too.

I found this same problem. our house is 21 years old. We had to have our bay window replaced from leaking and water damage. the other window on the same wall will be replaced soon. The newer windows are vinyl and the water does not affect it. They are also sealed better and you do not have to worry about storm windows. We used Champion to replace the bay window and will use them again to eventually replace the others that get lots of condensation.

We have the same problem but are getting new windows installed Thursday so I'm hoping that's the key to fixing it. I'm told it's because they aren't insullated properly, but I don't know for sure.

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