45 answers

Color Blind

Dose any know how to tell if your 3 yrs old is color blind? I have a 3 1/2 yrs old little girl and me and my mother have been trying to teach her color but all she say is every thing is blue.

What can I do next?

Featured Answers

Color blindness in girls is RARE. I would stop asking her what color things are and start saying, "Look at the RED fire truck." Look at the GREEN grass.. YELLOW sun.. then after awhile, follow a look at the _ with can you find something else that is __.

You can mix colors too. One fun (and relatively unmessy way to do it) is to spray white shaving foam in a bag and add a couple of drops of paint or food coloring - then seal and smush. My son learned his colors and predicting mixes this way.

S.

1 mom found this helpful

I agree with Nikki who suggested doing matching activities instead. There are products like sorting bears, in which you put all the yellow bears in the yellow cup, green in the green cup, etc. They're pretty fun!

Women are not color blind. They only carry the gene which they pass on to the males. This is a normal reaction for a child so young. Just keep teaching and she will finally get it. But sometimes they will call one color all the time because this is the one they like

More Answers

Color blindness in girls is RARE. I would stop asking her what color things are and start saying, "Look at the RED fire truck." Look at the GREEN grass.. YELLOW sun.. then after awhile, follow a look at the _ with can you find something else that is __.

You can mix colors too. One fun (and relatively unmessy way to do it) is to spray white shaving foam in a bag and add a couple of drops of paint or food coloring - then seal and smush. My son learned his colors and predicting mixes this way.

S.

1 mom found this helpful

By Diane Griffith, HealthAtoZ writer

If your child draws pictures of people with green skin and houses with brown grass, you may think he's being creative. The truth is, he may be color blind.

About 10 million men in America are color blind. That's about 8 percent of the country's male population. Color blindness (also called color vision deficiency) affects less than 1 percent of women. Most color blindness is inherited. Other causes include aging, glaucoma, cataracts and certain medications.

Types of color blindness

Red-green blindness. Trouble distinguishing between shades of red and green. This is the most common type.
Blue-yellow blindness. Difficulty telling the difference between shades of blue and green.
Green blindness. Inability to distinguish the green part of the color spectrum.
Absence of color vision. Seeing only black, white and shades of gray. This condition is very rare.

What causes color blindness?
In the retina of each of our eyes are three cones. Each cone reacts to a different color of light - red, blue or green. A defect in a cone causes mild color blindness. If a cone is missing completely, the color blindness is more severe.

A boy with color blindness inherits it from his mother, who inherited it from her father. This gene (involving the X chromosome) affects the cones.

A woman who carries the gene usually has normal color vision. If she has a son, the chances are 50-50 that he will be color blind. If a woman is color blind, her sons will be, too. The condition is rare in girls. If a girl is color blind, she has inherited one affected X chromosome from each parent.

Recognizing color blindness in your child
A child with a color vision problem may do any of the following:

Refer to colors - especially primary shades - by the wrong name.
Draw pictures differently than others (e.g., a tree trunk may be black or the grass brown.)
Refer to a light pink or light green object as white.
See reddish and greenish colors as similar (e.g., confusing peach and light green, or dark green and cranberry.)

Problems
Color blindness can't be cured. Your child may feel frustrated, but can adjust. He or she may have problems with:

Selecting the right crayon or marker
Choosing clothes that match
Reading color-coded maps or charts
Knowing when meat is completely cooked
Understanding traffic signals
Having a career that requires normal color vision (e.g., pilot, police officer, firefighter, printer, etc.)

Testing
The most common test for color blindness is the Ishihara. The child is shown a set of plates, each with a number, letter or symbol hidden in a circle of dots. The symbol is easy to see with normal vision, but invisible to someone who is color blind. Using this test, the doctor can determine what type of color blindness the child has.

Coping
Teach your child that color blindness is a unique trait, not a limitation.

Help your child by:

Accepting the color names your child uses
Describing an object without mentioning color - ask for the fuzzy pillow or the striped shirt
Gently suggesting clothing choices when something doesn't match
Telling your child's teacher about the condition
Talking about the future and explaining that certain professions require good color vision


Related Articles

Color Blindness


Visual Impairment





External Sources

Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Color blindness: more prevalent among males. Accessed October 27, 2006.


National Institutes of Health. Color vision deficiency. Accessed October 27, 2006.


Nemours Foundation. What's color blindness? Accessed October 27, 2006.


Optometric Physicians of Washington. Color vision deficiency. Accessed October 27, 2006.


Prevent Blindness America. Color blindness. Accessed October 27, 2006.

Women are not color blind. They only carry the gene which they pass on to the males. This is a normal reaction for a child so young. Just keep teaching and she will finally get it. But sometimes they will call one color all the time because this is the one they like

I am a painter who has taught children art in the past.....ask her why it is blue.....at her age she may not understand all the colors yet or that blue is the color of the sky......or she may and just be playing around.....eye docs have color books to check on color blindness..... here are some helpful sites http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Color_blindness http://www.toledo-bend.com/colorblind/Ishihara.html http://www.eyecaresource.com/conditions/color-blindness/

ask her to just run her finger over the numbers......

found another maybe better for younguns
http://www.rpbusa.org/rpb/eyetest/page_2/

good luck!

PS girls can be color blind........my daughter was from a somewhat rare neuro disorder.........

It is very unusual for a girl to be color blind. It's not impossible, just unusual. For a girl to be color blind, she had to get the gene from BOTH her mom AND dad. Your doctor can give your daughter a test (pick out a number or letter in a bunch of different colored dots). If she doesn't know her numbers and letters that well yet, the doctor may have a different type of test.

From my understanding, color blindness is only linked to the male genetic code- I would contact an optomologist just to check this info. Hope it helps!

Girls can in fact be color blind. It is just rare for a girl to be color blind. My father was color blind. He had an uncle and a great aunt that were both color blind. So it can happen in famales. It is just not very common at all. However, we are talking about your daughter and whether or not she is color blind. I found a website for you to look at with a little test that she should easily be able to do and you will know for sure then. Go to the following website and check it out. I think this will either put your mind at ease or let you know that you do have a problem. Just remember, you don't care if she knows what color the circle and square are, just that she can see them. As long as she can see them, then what you are dealing with is color recognition and not color blindness. Hope this helps. http://www.kidshealth.org/kid/talk/qa/color_blind.html

That doesn't mean she is color blind... that is just her favorited color and everything is blue. My 4 year old granddaughter instist that everything is green although she knows it isn't. See if she can match things of the same color.
have a blessed day!

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