31 answers

Clorox for Treatment of Eczema?

The local news channel recently posted a report on the use of bleach in bathwater in treatment of eczema. According to the report, you can add 1/2 cup of bleach for the last two minutes of a bath and it help alleviate flareups. It seems like it would be a little harsh, not to mention smelly. Has anyone ever heard of that, or tried it?

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OMG Please do not use bleach for that. Bleach is a carcinogyn and can cause cancer with eczema open skin can actually absorb more of it. I have some things that may help and you are welcome to contact me outside of the room . But please don't use the bleach. S.

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Here is a link to the study:
http://www.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=626424
With scientific studies like these, there is always a control group and a study group. The study group had the bleach baths and the control group didn't. The bleach baths were so effective that they stopped the study early so that the kids in the control group could start using the bleach technique. That tells me the technique must work, if they're willing to cut short their study that way.
Here is some more info from the article:
"Half of the children took diluted bleach baths (half a cup of bleach per full standard tub), while the others had a placebo mixed into their bath water. The children were told to soak in the baths for five to 10 minutes at a time, two times a week.

"Because the amount of bleach used was so small, the diluted bleach baths were nearly odor-free, the study noted.

"Over one to three months, the children who took the diluted bleach baths had a reduction in eczema severity that was five times greater than those in the placebo group. In fact, the children taking the baths showed such rapid improvement in eczema and infection symptoms that the researchers stopped the study early, so that children in the placebo group could get the same amount of relief."

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A friend of mine has a grandson that has this problem. Their pediatrician told them to use Crisco. She thought that lady was a whack, but it actually works. She says her grandsons feet look soooo much better. Come to find out, their pediatrician has eczema and has been using Crisco for years. Give it a try, she says it really does work wonders. Good luck.

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More Answers

OMG Please do not use bleach for that. Bleach is a carcinogyn and can cause cancer with eczema open skin can actually absorb more of it. I have some things that may help and you are welcome to contact me outside of the room . But please don't use the bleach. S.

2 moms found this helpful

Oh my gosh. I cannot even believe that this would be recommended. Bleach is so harmful as it is, but to actually soak in it? I can't even imagine.

There are much safer, better ways to alleviate flareups, and even ways to help in general wiht eczema. Most cleaning products have some type of bleach or other harsh ingredient that only worsens it.

You can email me (____@____.com) if you would like to learn more. But please, don't use the bleach bath tube. It might help for short term, but not long term, and you are exposing yourself to other conditions.

K.

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My grandson had severe exzema as a baby, and bleach water was one of the treatments. It does help some. He was also prescribed Derma-Smooth and our daughter still uses the generic equivalent of Eucerin cream when his skin gets dry (in winter, mostly here, but depending on where you live).

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I've never tried it, because my daughter doesn't have a very bad case of eczema, just some flare ups now and then. What I do know is that once she goes to the pool her eczema area is significantly better...practically gone. I've wondered if the bleach would work, but have not tried it.

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It's true that bleach (and chlorine) can help heal eczema, but the side effects would make it totally not worth it to me. Bleach can cause respiratory difficulties, headaches, skin burns, loss of consciousness, and vomiting, just to name a few.

I use a non-steroid lotion on my kids (who have mild cases of eczema) called Renew. It works better than anything else I've tried. It's from Melaleuca. PM me for more info on where to buy it.

Hope this helps!

1 mom found this helpful

Here is a link to the study:
http://www.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=626424
With scientific studies like these, there is always a control group and a study group. The study group had the bleach baths and the control group didn't. The bleach baths were so effective that they stopped the study early so that the kids in the control group could start using the bleach technique. That tells me the technique must work, if they're willing to cut short their study that way.
Here is some more info from the article:
"Half of the children took diluted bleach baths (half a cup of bleach per full standard tub), while the others had a placebo mixed into their bath water. The children were told to soak in the baths for five to 10 minutes at a time, two times a week.

"Because the amount of bleach used was so small, the diluted bleach baths were nearly odor-free, the study noted.

"Over one to three months, the children who took the diluted bleach baths had a reduction in eczema severity that was five times greater than those in the placebo group. In fact, the children taking the baths showed such rapid improvement in eczema and infection symptoms that the researchers stopped the study early, so that children in the placebo group could get the same amount of relief."

1 mom found this helpful

I have tried it and it seems to work

1 mom found this helpful

I know that method works on ring-worm and I don't see how it would hurt...but my suggestion is to get the Aveeno oatmeal bath treatments and the Aveeno Eczema skin lotion and apply several times a day. Also Eucerin is a great lotion that helps.

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