31 answers

Clorox for Treatment of Eczema?

The local news channel recently posted a report on the use of bleach in bathwater in treatment of eczema. According to the report, you can add 1/2 cup of bleach for the last two minutes of a bath and it help alleviate flareups. It seems like it would be a little harsh, not to mention smelly. Has anyone ever heard of that, or tried it?

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OMG Please do not use bleach for that. Bleach is a carcinogyn and can cause cancer with eczema open skin can actually absorb more of it. I have some things that may help and you are welcome to contact me outside of the room . But please don't use the bleach. S.

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Here is a link to the study:
http://www.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=626424
With scientific studies like these, there is always a control group and a study group. The study group had the bleach baths and the control group didn't. The bleach baths were so effective that they stopped the study early so that the kids in the control group could start using the bleach technique. That tells me the technique must work, if they're willing to cut short their study that way.
Here is some more info from the article:
"Half of the children took diluted bleach baths (half a cup of bleach per full standard tub), while the others had a placebo mixed into their bath water. The children were told to soak in the baths for five to 10 minutes at a time, two times a week.

"Because the amount of bleach used was so small, the diluted bleach baths were nearly odor-free, the study noted.

"Over one to three months, the children who took the diluted bleach baths had a reduction in eczema severity that was five times greater than those in the placebo group. In fact, the children taking the baths showed such rapid improvement in eczema and infection symptoms that the researchers stopped the study early, so that children in the placebo group could get the same amount of relief."

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A friend of mine has a grandson that has this problem. Their pediatrician told them to use Crisco. She thought that lady was a whack, but it actually works. She says her grandsons feet look soooo much better. Come to find out, their pediatrician has eczema and has been using Crisco for years. Give it a try, she says it really does work wonders. Good luck.

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OMG Please do not use bleach for that. Bleach is a carcinogyn and can cause cancer with eczema open skin can actually absorb more of it. I have some things that may help and you are welcome to contact me outside of the room . But please don't use the bleach. S.

2 moms found this helpful

Oh my gosh. I cannot even believe that this would be recommended. Bleach is so harmful as it is, but to actually soak in it? I can't even imagine.

There are much safer, better ways to alleviate flareups, and even ways to help in general wiht eczema. Most cleaning products have some type of bleach or other harsh ingredient that only worsens it.

You can email me (____@____.com) if you would like to learn more. But please, don't use the bleach bath tube. It might help for short term, but not long term, and you are exposing yourself to other conditions.

K.

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My grandson had severe exzema as a baby, and bleach water was one of the treatments. It does help some. He was also prescribed Derma-Smooth and our daughter still uses the generic equivalent of Eucerin cream when his skin gets dry (in winter, mostly here, but depending on where you live).

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I've never tried it, because my daughter doesn't have a very bad case of eczema, just some flare ups now and then. What I do know is that once she goes to the pool her eczema area is significantly better...practically gone. I've wondered if the bleach would work, but have not tried it.

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It's true that bleach (and chlorine) can help heal eczema, but the side effects would make it totally not worth it to me. Bleach can cause respiratory difficulties, headaches, skin burns, loss of consciousness, and vomiting, just to name a few.

I use a non-steroid lotion on my kids (who have mild cases of eczema) called Renew. It works better than anything else I've tried. It's from Melaleuca. PM me for more info on where to buy it.

Hope this helps!

1 mom found this helpful

Here is a link to the study:
http://www.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=626424
With scientific studies like these, there is always a control group and a study group. The study group had the bleach baths and the control group didn't. The bleach baths were so effective that they stopped the study early so that the kids in the control group could start using the bleach technique. That tells me the technique must work, if they're willing to cut short their study that way.
Here is some more info from the article:
"Half of the children took diluted bleach baths (half a cup of bleach per full standard tub), while the others had a placebo mixed into their bath water. The children were told to soak in the baths for five to 10 minutes at a time, two times a week.

"Because the amount of bleach used was so small, the diluted bleach baths were nearly odor-free, the study noted.

"Over one to three months, the children who took the diluted bleach baths had a reduction in eczema severity that was five times greater than those in the placebo group. In fact, the children taking the baths showed such rapid improvement in eczema and infection symptoms that the researchers stopped the study early, so that children in the placebo group could get the same amount of relief."

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I have tried it and it seems to work

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I know that method works on ring-worm and I don't see how it would hurt...but my suggestion is to get the Aveeno oatmeal bath treatments and the Aveeno Eczema skin lotion and apply several times a day. Also Eucerin is a great lotion that helps.

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It's my understanding that bleach is linked to various ailments including cancer, tho I could certainly be incorrect. I would never consider sitting in any dilution of bleach for any length of time. Among other things, do you REALLY want that near your hoohah? Given how common yeast and urinary tract infections are due to baths, do you really want to add bleach to the mix? Lastly, I've suffered from eczema for years as a result of food allergies. I thought eczema always resulted from allergies....? how would bleach be beneficial or offer lasting results that rival the health risk?

There are SO many reasons to avoid this! Before seriously considering it, ask your dr or allergist.

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No, No, No, No, No! Please don't use clorox! Eczema is a systemic condition that stems from too many toxins in the body. Chlorine bleach is simply another toxin. It will dry the condition if it is oozing ( for a very brief period) but it will make the condition worse. Clorox is also a neurotoxin that can do brain damage. Absorbing it through the skin gets it right into the blood stream and into the brain. We don't use any form of chlorine bleach in our home at all.

The best treatment for eczema is a good diet, an absorbable multivitamin/mineral complex and I have seen chiropractic care help as well (I can explain that if you need me to.)I use a lotion called Renew on my Dad's 90 year old skin. He had a good diet and was compulsive about exercise until he was old but I believe the toxicity from all the metal in his system from multiple surgeries during WWII continued to aggravate his skin and cause the Eczema and Psoriasis he had. He had horrible flareups, even with Eucerin, until we found the Renew. Now his skin looks better than most babies.

I have seen eczema conpletely cured not only in my Dad but friend's kids and friends of mine...it's a matter of knowing the first piece of the puzzle.

I'll be glad to help further. Just ask...

God bless!

M.
www.squidoo.com/ifyourbabycouldtalk

PS There's already bleach in our bath water if we use city/county water, aaarrrgh!

1 mom found this helpful

I have never heard of that, and it seems like that would burn more than help. I have, however, heard of castor oil. Read up on the many wonders of the oil. It is a real miracle oil. Edgar Cayce sang it's praises, and I have seen results myself. Good luck and God Bless!

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Ouch, I would not recommend that since there is a chance that the skin has open areas and the bleach can cause more tissue damage, irritation and pain. I have used bleach in the bathwater for my husband when he had chiggers....texas ailment. I use a great lotion that has no steriods (the doc will offer those) for my son who has a mild case of eczema. It keeps it at bay and even his daycare provider has argued that he can't possibly have it. It's from Arbonne International and is part of their ABC baby line. If you have questions feel free to contact me. Good luck and just another note....the bleach is probably killing the bacteria for wounds...so does peroxide but doctors are hesitant to use it because of the tissue damage....hope this helps!!! take care!

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Hi D., The reason that Clorox would help is that bacteria live in the eczema affected skin. Killing the bacteria would help your skin heal. But, bleach is a known carcinogen (cancer causing) and extremely harsh. Even though it is diluted, I wouldnt subject myself or anyone else to that.

An alternative treatment is Melaleuca oil ... but, don't use it by itself. Melaleuca also naturally kills bacteria. It is present in the lotion called Renew. Renew works wonders on eczema. We use it all of the time. In fact, we have it in every room in my house and travel sizes in my back pack. We by it through the on-line store and have shopped there for five years.

D.

1 mom found this helpful

Definitely a carcinogen! So many problems we have are do to with too many of these little compromises for too many years...

People are getting bleach residue from wearing bleached clothes when their body heats up, sleeping on bleached sheets, from bleach residue left on their dishes washing in a automatic dishwasher (unless using a natural product)...and many have to breathe the stuff because the mom is cleaning with it. The American Lung Association is saying it's too much for too many years causing increasing problems with each generation.

Asthma has gone up 600% in the last 20 years in children - and these harsh chemicals are a real viable suspect.

There are 1000 reason for eczema - healing the sores is important, but not necessarily the root for all.

Julia's comment is really important to consider - Melaleuca's Renew lotion has a huge file of success stories for eczema...one mom recently said that three years of steriods did not prevent bloody pj's each morning...one week of Renew did!

J. B.
www.joyboudreaum.com

1 mom found this helpful

A friend of mine has a grandson that has this problem. Their pediatrician told them to use Crisco. She thought that lady was a whack, but it actually works. She says her grandsons feet look soooo much better. Come to find out, their pediatrician has eczema and has been using Crisco for years. Give it a try, she says it really does work wonders. Good luck.

1 mom found this helpful

There are a lot of factors for eczema, but one thing I remember is that a daily bath can make it worse, and it is better to only give kids a bath a couple of times a week. You may want to check into food allergies or sensitivities, because several kids I know have gotten a lot of help by identifying food triggers that cause or worsen eczema.

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I have never heard of using clorox, but my little girl has eczema too. We use Mustela stelatopia creamy cleanser to wash the areas that are inflamed. Then we use the Mustela stelatopia moisturizing cream as a lotion after bath and before jammies. They also have a milky bath oil that is good to dab on the really dry spots before the lotion. This has all but made my little girls spots go away. We only occasionally have to use the milky bath oil anymore and you can't see the areas anymore. I highly recommend the Mustela products. I know they are a little pricey but it only takes a small dab so they last a good while. Hope this helps!

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I have heard that bleach works, but have always been too chicken to try it. If you are just using it on yourself (not a child) and are feeling adventurous, I say go for it. BUT, if you chicken out, like I have, try this: I find that anything antiseptic works. One day I was desperate, so I used some Purell hand sanitizer with aloe, and it cleared up significantly by the next morning. As previously mentioned, tea tree oil is great - it also has a cooling sensation which is really nice when you're itchy. Aloe is also supposed to work great. With all that being said, I've had the most success with a combo of antiseptic and (strangley) diaper rash cream. Apparently the zinc oxide in diaper rash cream works wonders on eczema (it has for me). I use Boudreaux's Butt Paste becuase it has the highest concentration of zinc oxide.

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Sunshine and Bleach do the same thing except sunshine will do it without the chemical exposure. I don't think a dilute solution of bleach will increase his risk for cancer. People who work in restaurant kitchens or food processing centers use 200 ppm solutions all day long and are fine.

I think some serious backyard nude time will help clear up any bacterial infections in his skin. It will also increase his Vitamin D levels which also helps fight infection. Just remember to avoid using sun screen.

Also, the natural soil bacteria are very probiotic. My kids are always putting dirt, mulch, rocks and other stuff in their mouth. They're tan, dirty, and very very healthy.

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I would stay away from bleach in bath water. Bleach is toxic in any amount. The amount they gave you is what is considered "safe" for adults...they cannot test the affects on children b/c it is illegal. I would use Aveeno Oatmeal baths or a Shaklee product. If you like I can do some research with a nutritionalist on a natural way to help with eczema...just let me know. I will be on vaction for a few days so I won't get back to you right away.

What ever you do do not use bleach on your son. It is soooooo bad. Do the research. You will be shocked.

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I would not do that! Especially, if it is your 2 year old that has the eczema. Bleach on that child's sensitive skin may do more harm than good. Oatmeal soaps are a big help as well as limiting sugars in the diet. Fruits are good, but anything with processed sugars aggravate the problem. Good luck.

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I had heard that before but always thought it was an old wives tale. I know a guy who swears a little bleach in his bathwater helped a wound to heal.

Yes, i have tried this and i am still doing it. The clorox seems to be working. I put it in at the beginning of my bath and then i apply some hydrocortisone cream after completely drying off. Then i also apply vaseline unscented to keep my skin from getting dry. I only use a quarter cup.

I saw that same story and thought it was bizarre. i would definately talk to the ped. first.

Also, i don't know if it helps flare-ups, but i know it helps alleviate some of the irritation - www.sarah-noelle.com has all natural (and seriously ALL natural) skin care stuff - mostly oatmeal scrubs and masks - but the lady started the company because her neice (Sarah Noelle) has really bad exzema.

My neice has it too and it helps a lot. It's also great because my parents were buying Rx creams for her that had so many chemicals and synthetic things.

Check out some stuff for you too :) It's AWESOME!

WOW, I never heard of that, that would be supper easy.

the reason this was stumbled upon as a treatment is that parents and doctors noticed that children with eczema had better skin in the summer- particularly in those who swam in chlorinated pools. like some others posted, subsequent research showed that the normal bacteria on the skin play a role in instigating eczema so the chlorine in pools cuts down on the bacterial load in the skin. Skin is also more moist in the summer so this plays a role as well, also the sun kills bacteria as mentioned in another post but UV rays most likely pose a greater risk than bleach so I don't agree with that poster. Therefore the recommendation is to put merely a 1/2 cup to one cup of bleach in a full bath tub and let the child soak- this brings the chlorine to the concentration in most pools. Depending on the child's age you need to use your own judgement as is what is safe for babies eyes and what not- do not dunk baby in bleached water! I suggest doing normal bath time and then adding bleach at the end for the younger kids especially- soak for 10 mins if you can although shorter periods for younger kids who can't tolerate that should benefit as well. Then moisturize afterwards! eucerin, vaseline on tough spots. etc. Avoid wool and lanolin at all costs in addition to irritating dyes/scents. I am a physician by the way, felt compelled to post after someone blogged that bleach is a carcinogyn, ie carcinogen, which it is not for the way that all of us normally use it. in addition i think mimi s's post is full of bogus theories as well as some others. one lady i didn't agree with but I do agree with her suggestion of aveeno. the treatment for eczema should focus on moisturization to prevent skin breakdown/cracking, bacterial load reduction to prevent irritation/breakdown, and topical steroids in cautious amounts to prevent inflammation

That is insane....I would not recomend it.
The dr. can prescibe lotions to use and it is much safer.
Jen

ugh. not sure I would try it. Call a Derm and ask or just try using a mix of it on a washcloth to soak or blot the areas only, you would hate to take a bath in it and it irritate your you-know-what!!! Sounds WAY harsh.

This sounded odd to me too. However after looking this up it's what should be done in extreme cases. See url.
Chronic eczema sufferers, unlike healthy people, carry Staph aureus on their skin
the bleach kills this
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/01/health/01case.html?page...

Call your doctor's office and ask their opinion.

You didn't say if the eczema is your problem or your son's, but either way, I wouldn't use toxic bleach. Check out www.feingold.org. Feingold is a 30yr old non-profit organization whose purpose is to inform the public about petroleum-based artificial ingredients in our food supply. These harmful additives cause ADD, ADHD, and many other physical side effects including skin allergies. Yellow dyes are especially bad for allergies. It is also very helpful (for skin and hair) to drink lots of water (no sodas) eat plenty of fruits and veggies and take fish oil every day. Best wishes.

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