28 answers

Child Has Worms...

Okay, I am really ambarrassed to even talk about this because I feel it's somehoe my fault not to mention it's disgusting. My 9 year old daughter's butt was itchy about a month ago & without getting into details we found out she had worms. The doctor gave us medication for her and it seemed to have gone away. Unfortunately she started itching again down there and sure enough they are back. My question is has anyone else out there gone through this and what did you do to prevent this? I try to make sure she keeps her hands washed and take showers/baths about every other day but apparently that's not enough. Please help because I am really getting grossed out. I don't let her know that but I definitely want this gone forever!

What can I do next?

So What Happened?™

Thank you all for ALL the responses on my issue. Every one of them was very helpful and it's nice to know that I'm not the only one. To comment on some of them, we do not have any animals which I did read wouldn't matter anyway. I am supposed to bring a specimen back to her doctor so they can look into this more but I just feel that we just never really got rid of them the first go round. I did get her a scrub brush to help with cleaning under her nails because she does like to bite them. I can just imagine all the goodies living under there! As of right now there are no signs of them but I obviously won't stop treating her until I know for sure they are gone! I actually went and purchased all new bed linen for our bed and hers as well as washed the old ones. And I have also cleaned everywhere I can think. We did all take the medicine the first time and I'm sure we'll have to do it again.

But thanks again for all your input. This is a great website for us mothers!

Featured Answers

Kristinha ~ Yup, those worms are gross, but Oh, so common. They may have come back because there were still eggs somewhere (sheets, panties, bathingsuit) or because she picked them up at the same place she got them originally (soil outside, friends' house). Lots of kids have them and parents have no clue.

The meds are over the counter, and once there is an infestation, kids need to be treated two weeks after the first treatment. Treat the whole family just to be safe.

Worms, lice, ringworm, impetigo...kids can be covered in ickiness! :-)

L.

2 moms found this helpful

I really don't know, but do you have pets that she could be getting it from? Or does she play outside a lot in dirty dirt that may have animal feces where she's picking it up?

1 mom found this helpful

More Answers

Pinworms are easy to get. Pinworms are usually spread from child to child, as the eggs can be picked up on children's fingers when they are playing. Eggs can stay on your child's skin for several hours. They can survive for up to 3 weeks on clothes, bedding and toys. If the eggs are on your child's hands or toys and your child puts their fingers or toys in their mouth, the tiny eggs can enter their bodies. The eggs stay in the upper part of the intestine until they hatch. After they hatch, the worms move down the length of the intestine, and then out the anus where they lay more eggs.

When children scratch their itchy bottoms, the tiny eggs can get under their fingernails. As the children move around the house, the eggs may be spread, and other family members can become infected. Children who suck their thumbs are at an increased risk. Sometimes adults breathe in the eggs when the bed covers are shaken. However, this is very uncommon. Children easily infect each other while they are playing and by not thoroughly washing their hands before eating. Pets do not spread pinworms, although they may carry their own kinds of worms.

Most pinworm infections are mild and easily treated. Your doctor may prescribe a single chewable tablet of a medicine called mebendazole (brand name: Vermox). About 2 weeks later, a second tablet is taken. Or your doctor may recommend another kind of medicine, pyrantel (brand names: Pin-X, Pin-Rid). This is also taken in 2 doses about 2 weeks apart.

Even if only one child in the family has pinworms, it is often important that everyone in the household be treated with the pinworm medicine at the same time. All the sheets, blankets, towels and clothing in the house should be washed in hot water, and everyone's fingernails (which might hold the worm eggs) should be carefully cleaned and cut short. Toys, countertops, floors and other surfaces the infected child has touched should be scrubbed. Carpets should be vacuumed.

If you get treatment from your doctor right away and keep everything in the house very clean, your family's encounter with pinworms should soon be over.

5 moms found this helpful

Kristinha ~ Yup, those worms are gross, but Oh, so common. They may have come back because there were still eggs somewhere (sheets, panties, bathingsuit) or because she picked them up at the same place she got them originally (soil outside, friends' house). Lots of kids have them and parents have no clue.

The meds are over the counter, and once there is an infestation, kids need to be treated two weeks after the first treatment. Treat the whole family just to be safe.

Worms, lice, ringworm, impetigo...kids can be covered in ickiness! :-)

L.

2 moms found this helpful

In addition to what other posters have written, you should make certain your daughter (and everyone else in the family) is changing underwear at least twice per day. (Clean underwear before going to bed. Clean underwear when you wake up. The underwear should be put directly into the washing machine - rather than dropped onto the floor or into a hamper. Don't give the eggs an opportunity to drop off around the house.)

Also, I noticed that a couple of posters said that pinworms CAN be spread back and forth between humans and pets. This isn't correct. Pinworms don't survive in the intestinal tracts of pets. Pets have their own kinds of worm infestations. Some of those worms CAN infect humans and this is called zoonosis. (You didn't mention what kind of worms your daughter had, but I automatically assumed pinworms because this is a VERY common thing for children to contract.) But, some of the worms that children can contract include tapeworms, roundworms, and hookworms. But, even so, this is VERY rare.

Unlike with pinworms (which can easily be spread through an entire family), children are usually the only humans who will contract tape/round/hookworms because children (unlike most adults) have under-developed immune systems, poor hygenic habits(i.e. not washing hands before eating/after going to the bathroom), and are more likely to put their hands (and other objects) into their mouths.

This is a really good site for information on pinworms: http://www.personalmd.com/news/pinworm_071900.shtml

2 moms found this helpful

K., I know that having worms has the connotation of having been caused by a lack of cleanliness. That's not true. Worms have been on the rise and one can easily get an egg into their system by touching soil, an vegetable or fruit, or something that someone who has worms has recently touched if they haven't washed their hands after a bowel movement.

My family had worms 60 years ago and it wasn't due to uncleanliness. They were common in some soils. We lived in an agricultural area. Use of animal manure for fertilizer was common.

It's possible that the first round of medicine didn't get all of the eggs. I remember taking at least two rounds. My daughter is adamant about washing all fresh produce before eating it. I've not been. My granddaughter and I often stop at the playground between the store and my home and eat the berries we've purchased. After reading this article I'm going to be more careful about washing.

The eggs are too small to see. The article was in the Oregonian, I think in the Food Day section. They were talking about sushi.

good luck to you and please don't feel that it's your fault or an indication of being dirty.

1 mom found this helpful

We had this problem a while ago, and I can't remember the name of the product, but it's yellowish and it's over-the-counter. We got ours at Safeway. I don't know if your Dr. told you, but you really need to treat the whole family, even if there aren't symptoms. A person could have worms and not know it.
The eggs last for a while and it could be that the medication doesn't take care of the eggs. Don't be embarrassed, and it's not your fault. Worms and lice and all those pesky little parasites have been with us forever, it's just that people didn't used to talk about it. I'm sure you'll have good success with that O-T-C product.
Good luck!

1 mom found this helpful

First off... try to stop blaming yourself. Worms are contracted in different ways, not being clean enough is just one of them. Talk to your doctor about this. Do you have animals that may have worms? Anyway - I do medical transcription for several pediatricians and you would be surprised at the number of children who are diagnosed with worms.

Also, this might sound a little strange, but I used to live in West Africa, where it was incredibly common to get worms and parasites of many kinds... just by where you walk. Anyway - I know this fruit isn't exactly in abundance in the states, but eating papaya seeds (the seeds, not the fruit), a spoonful a day for a week completely cleanses the system. You do not chew the seeds, only swallow. Just cut the fruit open and scoop out a spoonful. It doesn't look very appetizing... but it really works.

1 mom found this helpful

There is a lot of info on the internet about pinworms. One of them is http://kidshealth.org/parent/infections/parasitic/pinworm...
I'm a grandmother, and it was not unusual for us to get pinworms when we were a children growing up on a farm in Michigan. My mother used to give us a salt water enema, which immediately got rid of them and brought immediate relief from the itching. Now, you can get meds from your doctor or you can go to a store that sells natural remedies and get over the counter parasite capsules. The pinworm eggs enter the child through the mouth and then hatch in the lower intestines. They can often be seen in the bowel movements if you look closely.

1 mom found this helpful

Actually worms are quite common. Most children get them and many without even knowing. Many times its from dirt under the fingernails. Especially if she tends to put her fingers in her mouth or bites her fingernails. As a child I also got them. I used to bite my fingernails. My advice would to make sure she washes her hands often, keep her nails short and have her scrub under her nails with a nail brush. I know it's gross but it's one of those things that might happen to our little ones. Good luck!

1 mom found this helpful

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