27 answers

Chapter Book for 5 Yr Old Boy

My son is in Kindergarten and part of our nightly homework is to read at least 15 min every night. We have lots of books, but they are mostly picture type books and I want to introduce him to some "real" books with short chapters and fewer pictures. My thought is we could read the picture books and early reader books each night so he can practice reading himself (he doesn't read yet, but is learning to sound out small words- so he's getting close), and then each night maybe read 1 chapter of a larger book. What books would you suggest for a 5-6 yr old boy? All the books I remember reading are more for girls (Charlotte's web, Nancy Drew, Beverly Cleary etc.,) and I read very early so in 1st/2nd grad I was reading 4-5th grade material so most of the stuff I can remember I don't think would be appropriate for him yet. I've heard of the Magic Treehouse series, but that's all I've heard of. Suggestions?

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So What Happened?™

Thanks everyone! To clarify, I did intend for the chapter books to be me reading to him just to get him used to longer books that are read in more than one sitting. I have a good starting list to take with me to the library, and I'm excited to see how it goes!

Featured Answers

HENRY AND MUDGE - the best series for boys, ever! Funny thing is, the set we have belonged to my daughter first. My MIL gave them to her as a present. What a wonderful gift!

1 mom found this helpful

When my kids were in kindergarten and 1st grade, I read them Charlotte's Web, Trumpet of the Swan, Little House on the Prairie. While it is true that the books could be considered "girl" books, reading them isn't really gender based. My son also like to hear the books read, though he didn't have much choice really. The Magic Treehouse books are great. I also read them Encyclopedia Brown books that I found at the library. A friend reads the 39 Clues books to her son who is now 5 or 6 and he enjoys them-plus she gets a little extra reading time.

1 mom found this helpful

I'm a big fan of the Magic Tree House Series. You could read the whole book in one sitting in you choose. Also, they are designed so that it's best to read them in order.

The Baily School Kids (they're silly, but fun)

The Mouse and the Motorcylce (I think it's Beverly Cleary)

We never read Nancy Drew, but there is the boy's version - The Hardy Boys.

What about the illustrated classics
Guilver's Travels
20,000 Leagues Under the Sea
Black Beauty

More Answers

There are four stages of development on the jouney to becoming a skilled reader. There are books at any book store that will have levels on them and your son's level is either going to be Level R or Level 1. You need to make sure that your son doesn't get frustrated with Chapter books.
The Level R or 1 books will build on simple words, short vowel sounds, similar sounds, etc... Then, the next level, Level 2, will build on those skills and introduce long vowels, blended consonants, etc...
NOW, with that being said, YOUR reading Chapter books to your son would be a wonderful idea if you aren't already doing that. Some Chapter books are:
Moose Crossing, How Not to Babysit Your Brother, The Karate Class Mystery, Goofball Malone Ace Detective: Follow That Flea, Nate the Great and the Fishy Prize, just to name a few.

1 mom found this helpful

HENRY AND MUDGE - the best series for boys, ever! Funny thing is, the set we have belonged to my daughter first. My MIL gave them to her as a present. What a wonderful gift!

1 mom found this helpful

When my kids were in kindergarten and 1st grade, I read them Charlotte's Web, Trumpet of the Swan, Little House on the Prairie. While it is true that the books could be considered "girl" books, reading them isn't really gender based. My son also like to hear the books read, though he didn't have much choice really. The Magic Treehouse books are great. I also read them Encyclopedia Brown books that I found at the library. A friend reads the 39 Clues books to her son who is now 5 or 6 and he enjoys them-plus she gets a little extra reading time.

1 mom found this helpful

My kids liked a series called The Time Warp Trio by Jon Scieszka. The Narnia Series is good, maybe not for a 5 year old...the series of the boxcar children is a good series. Even though they are older the Beverly Cleary books, Beezus and Ramona, Henry and Risby....all good. My daughter loved the Junie B Jones books. Magic tree house is cute and a quick read, small chapters. Read books you both will enjoy, if it is a book you are familiar with you can elaborate and have great discussions!

You've had great answers. I love Charlottes Web. It was the first book my son read independently. My son also loved the Magic Treehouse series.One book that hasn't been mentioned is Skinnybones. I actually laughed out loud when I read it! And to me - that's the true secret - read something that you enjoy and also look forward to.

My grandmother taught me that trick. She read adult books to my dad. She said that he liked animals, so as long as there was an animal in it, he would listen - even as a preschooler (like Black Beauty,Rin-Tin-TIn). Also, if it is a subject that your son loves, he will be rapt, whether it be about sports, dinosaurs, etc.

I like the Time Soldier books. I have started reading these with my 4 year old son and he loves them! They are good adventure stories and a nice bridge from picture books to chapter books.

Stuart Little might be good or you could try Beverly Cleary's Henry stories or The Mouse and the Motorcycle. I've seen "big" read aloud versions of some of these in the bargain bin at Borders that would be nice for reading together.

When I was 4 or 5, my favorite book was the Wizard of Oz. Obviously such a young child won't get all the themes, but there's a lot of great imagery.

The first chapter book I read to/with my son was Treasure Island. He loved it!

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