12 answers

Cavities on a 15 Month Old Baby?

is it possible for my 15 mth old daughter to get a cavitie on her molar. I opened her mouth and saw what looks like a dark spot on her molar like a cavity. I dont want her to loose her primaries so soon. help!!!

What can I do next?

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If you daughter is still on the bottle and using it frequently, it could be something like baby bottle rot on the teeth. Or it could be iron from the formula. It could very well be a cavitiy too. My husband is a pediatric dentist in Plantaion,so I know a little bit about this, but I would have a consultation with a pediatric dentist. If you are interested in seeing someone, my husbands name is Jason Hirsch, Pediatric Dentistry ###-###-####. Office has been there for 30 plus yrs. and is kid friendly. Good Luck-

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Have it looked at as soon as possible by a dentist. On a side note, my 2 year old developed cavities which started out as discoloration on his top 4 front teeth because of a problem with his lip over his tooth. I took him to a pediatric dentist who strapped him to a board in a straight jacket (it's called a papoose) and went to work. He was given local anesthesia but screamed like he didn't get anything for the entire 45 minutes they worked on him. It was the worst 45 minutes of my life. I had no idea until afterwards that other dentists have laughing gas and the like that make the visit MUCH more tolerable. Every single day for 4 months my son asked every time we got into if we were going to the dentist. He has finally stopped asking (6 months later) and we were sure he had forgotten it. The dentist is on a side of town that we rarely go in but yesterday we drove right by the dentist office and Nick started saying dentist dentist are we going to the denstist. Broke my heart. He even knew where the office was and looked like even though we had only been there 1 time. He saw it out the window and was freaking out.
Ok, this story was longer than I really intended it to be but the point is, if your baby has a cavity, go to a dentist that is not going to traumatize her (and you).
Best of luck,
Jen
Mom of 3 boys - 5 yrs old, 2.5 yrs old, and 1 yr old

Hi, F.. Yes, absolutely, it is more than possible for a child that young to get cavities. My son inherited my bad teeth and had cavities that young, too. Take her to a children's dentist (pediatric dentist) and get her checked out. He can fill the cavity before it gets worse.

Peace,
Syl

Your daughter could definitely have cavities at her age. My daughter was around that age when we started noticing black spots on her molars and took her to the pediatrician and he told us that it was nothing to worry about so we figured he knew what he was talking about and didn't do anything about it much later. Many crowns and fillings later I think back and should have taken her to a pediatric dentist. I would suggest to go see a pediatric dentist!!

It is very possible she has a cavity. I work at the College of Dentistry at the University of Florida and I see kids all day with bad teeth. I would say get it checked out now, if its not great. but if it is, you want it stopped before it goes any further.

Hi,
Anyone with teeth can get cavities... they form due to excessive acidity and lack of mineralization of teeth. With a baby I'd make sure the child is getting enough minerals and nutrients and not getting too much sugars/sweets. Also, for later consideration, I found that toothpaste is not really that good for stopping cavities - I use Tooth Soap made with pure organic oils instead. It's great for teeth and gums and doesn't have fluoride, fluoride being an element that is shown to contribute to fluorisis, cancers, bone less, lower IQ, and endocrine disruption. Adding fluoride to toothpaste and public waterworks is one of the bigger scams of the 20th Century and the dental profession will never admit they have been encouraging people to do something that harms their health since they wouldn't want to be sued like the tobacco industry. To learn more about Tooth Soap and dental health visit the link below - they have some good free articles.

http://www.automateyourwebsite.com/app/?af=694666

Yes, she can get cavities. My daughter starting getting cavities around the same age and ended up with w/ a mouthful. I made the mistake of nursing her to sleep. Get them checked by a pediatric dentist. i say pediatric dentist because I took my daughter to my dentist who said they were only spots and turned out to be cavities. Pediatric dentists work with children's teeth differently.

If you need a referral to a good pediatric dentist-we love ours, please let me know.

Good luck.

If you daughter is still on the bottle and using it frequently, it could be something like baby bottle rot on the teeth. Or it could be iron from the formula. It could very well be a cavitiy too. My husband is a pediatric dentist in Plantaion,so I know a little bit about this, but I would have a consultation with a pediatric dentist. If you are interested in seeing someone, my husbands name is Jason Hirsch, Pediatric Dentistry ###-###-####. Office has been there for 30 plus yrs. and is kid friendly. Good Luck-

Yes it is possible. As far as what to do... if it were me, I would ask about it when I next visited the dentist (for my own teeth). Be sure that you are brushing her teeth daily. And be aware that "health" foods like raisins are HORRIBLE for the teeth. That stuff just sticks down in the crevices and is sugar- natural or not, it still promotes decay.
Maybe it's not and she just has some food stuck there. Be sure to brush them well in either case.
Good luck.

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