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Can You Diagnose Dairy Allergy with Skin Allergy Testing or Blood Testing??

I am curious if you can diagnose a dairy allergy with skin testing or blood testing? Please share your experiences. I would love to hear the name of the tests if you know that too. Thank you so much for your help~

M.

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yes, you can diagnose dairy allergies with a blood test. I would assume it could be done by skin test as well. They tested my daughter with a blood test, though.

IgG blood test. These are the labs that I trust:

Food Allergy Panel – www.imunolabs.com, www.gsdl.com or www.sagelabs.com

You will be able to find out if there is a problem with soy and over 100 different other food/food groups.

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I have raised two kids and working on other. The pin test is not fun for kids. The doctor had me put her on a very plain diet of hot dogs with no dyes, potatoes, spam, and then enter one thing in at a time for a week to two and see what happens. It took three days for mine to develope a cold and ear infection. She reacted to milk, eggs and dyes. The pin test was inconclusive. When she turned three she was scheduled for surgey for tonsils ect. she got ice cream for her birthday and well she then too sick. I took her back in after the medications given for two weeks and the doctor said she no longer need surgery. She never had another bout of tonsilitis for five years. She is still a little sensitive to milk but nothing like then.
Now the next one was the same way. She had tubes put in and was fine.
The third one had the test also and they came up saying one thing and in time we found out it was more serious and not milk at all. She is hyper sensitive to gluton. Go figure.
I am not a big believer in the allergy pin test.
The blood work is good if the doctor tests for the right things but it is a different kind of test.
From the sound of it if it were me i would have the tonsils and adnoids out. It really can't hurt in the long run. There are several other glands that will do the same job and not cause a severe breathing problems. You both will get through this and be much stronger. Research is key.

My daughter did a skin test and they told her she wasn't allergic to dairy. I took her off of it anyway and her allergies went away. that test doesn't test for everything that dairy is composed of. take him off of dairy immediatley. we saw such a difference in her. it's a shame what the dairy industry is doing to our children. dairy is for small baby calfs to turn into big fat cows! also, i read your other post and my newphew had the EXACT problems as your son, they thought he was going to stp breathing at night so eah parent took turns to make sure he was breathing and they eventually took his anoids out. and ithink they put tubes in his ears as well. he had a speech issue and tha was part of the problem, he couldn't hear. good luck what you are going through sounds very scary. lways go and get thoe second and third opinion even if you have topay out of pokcet.
g

yes, you can diagnose dairy allergies with a blood test. I would assume it could be done by skin test as well. They tested my daughter with a blood test, though.

I have two allergetic children and I am also, and we tried both skin and blood tests. The skin tests for pollen, animal dander, mold, etc proved to be accurate. Food testing less so. The best way I found food allergies/intolerances was with an elimination diet. If i only took one thing out and they got better and then put it back in and the symptoms came back, I think you have found the cause. All three of my children reacted with diarrhea to soy formulas after I weaned them from breast feeding(for various medical reasons) and cow's milk. I wound up raising all three children on GOAT'S milk until the age of five. At that time they were each able to tolerate cow's milk. Both by husband and I came from families with a history of milk digestion issues. If all else fails, try goat's milk. It was much more digestible and they grew and thrived on it. All are tolerant of dairy product as adults. My son and I took allergy shots together and we are both much improved. It was painful for my son to start at the age of four but he improved so much over the years, it was worth it. He was very brave for a four year old. Good luck. Maybe someone else can benefit from what I went through. I also recommended goat's milk for a couple of friends' children that had the diarrhea and they cleared up like a miracle when taken off of cow's milk and put on goat's milk. It ain't cheap, but what a difference in the health of my kids!

Hi M.,

Okay, I have a lot of information to share since this is something I have recently had to research for my 5-year old son, so please hang in there . . .

There are food allergies and food intollerances. With a food allergy, you will get an immediate reaction like anaphylactic (sp?) shock or a rash. With a food intollerance, the symptoms are more subtle and develop over a course of time so they are not so easy to spot. For my son, who has a dairy intollerance, he had a problem with diarrhea and overly soft stools, which I think was is why we had an awful time trying to potty train him. I think it may have also played a role with some of the attention and hyperactivity problems we were having with him.

Now, as far as dairy is concern, there are two types of food intollerances: (1) an intollerance to lactose which is a sugar that is found in milk; and (2) an intollerance to casein which is the actual milk protein. If you have a problem with lactose intollerance, you can consume lactose-free dairy products or take an chewable enzyme to help you break down the lactose and you should be just fine. If casein is the problem, well, you will need to avoid eating all things containing casein, which isn't so easy because they can be found in a lot of non-dairy products like lunchmeats, hot dogs, bread, some soy yogurts and vegetarian cheese products, spaghetti sauce, as well as the more obvious dairy products like milk, cheese, yogurt. Also, milk and casein can be listed on a products ingredients list under a number of different names so, if this does end up being the problem for you, I would sugest reading up on the issue in the www.gfcfdiets.com or www.tacanow.org websites for more specific info on the subject. Not all of the info may apply to your situation but you can flesh out what you need from what you don't.

Good luck.

L.

A skin test or IgE (blood) test will disclose food allergies and an IgG test will disclose food intollerances. I would suggest skipping the skin test and having the IgG and IgE test done. We had ours done at our local Quest Diagnostic Lab and it was covered by our insurance.

Hi M.,

Definitely blood....I work with a company,that has in home tests.One of our tests is the Aller test.It looks at the top 10 food allergies.You can go to my website: www.karencormier.com

Actually,there is a special on that test for June!!

From there click on my links,and then on Custom test series...You can read about the test,and see if it makes sense for you!

I'd be happy to assist you,in anyway I can!!

Best of luck with whatever you decide!!

In Health

K.

You want to get a RAST test done, which is a blood test. They will look for antibodies to the offending protein in your child's blood. There is also a skin test, but it yields a lot of false negatives when it comes to food allergies. The skin tests are much more reliable for environmental and seasonal allergies. For food allergies, definitely have the blood test done.

Yes, it can be detected by both test. Both my daughters suffer from allergies so I have been down this road. If you have to choose, I would pick the blood test of the scratch test. The Scratch test was very tramautic for our little one.
Also, you may want to educate yourself about NAET. YOu can go to www.NAET.com

Good Luck

A.
www.naturesbabyorganics.com

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