34 answers

Can Toddlers Drink Tea?

My 2 1/2 year old seems congested & has a slight cough. I don't want to give him milk that might aggravate the congestion, but I know Tea is soothing to me and I would like for him to have something to soothe his throat and help loosen the congestion.

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Thank you all for the insightful & thoughtful responses! I was amazed at the timeliness of responses and so appreciative.
Typical 2 year old...He was so excited to have some tea with mommy. The entire drive home from Grandma's house he was talking about it. We got home, I heated the water, steeped the tea, sliced the lemon, got the honey, put an ice cube in the tea, made sure it was perfect temperature...and of course he took one sip and wanted "something else". I'm going to keep trying though, I think he'll benefit during these times when he's sick.

Featured Answers

One of the first things that my daughter has asked for when she wasn't feeling great since she was little bitty was warm tea. I love a tea called "Sleepy Time Tea" (You can find it at most major stores & I've even found it at Warmart) b/c it is a decaf herbal chamomile that totally soothes & really does relax to a point of making them sleepy. I always mix it with a little fresh lemon & organic honey to coat the throat & she just sips it down.

2 moms found this helpful

I've been giving my son tea since he was a year old. Herbal teas are amazing for kids. There's a recipe for ginger, lemon, honey tea on weelicious that I give him whenever he's sick or congested. It's heavenly!-www.weelicious.com

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Well they do make Tea just for kids. It is by Traditional Medicinals. It is organic and I think you can find it at Whole Foods or a Vitamin store. Here is a web site for them www.traditionalmedicinals.com

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More Answers

Totally depends on the type of tea, and what types are okay depend on a) whether or not you allow some/any caffeine & b) what "else" is in it.

BTW...If you allow chocolate, you allow *some* caffeine.

A tea, by definition, is an infusion (as opposed to a decoction) of herbs. Infusion, means steeping in hot water, decoction means to actually boil for a period of time. Infusions extract the more delicate/volatile substances, decoctions get the more "stable" or difficult substances. The chemical extracted from the boiled inner bark of a cherry tree is the acting ingredient in most cough syrups. An infusion of that same bark produces flavor but no cough suppresant/expectorant.

Teas to AVOID:
- Any tea advertised for colds/flus...these teas usually have specific medicine in them (like but not limited to: asprin, decongestants, painrelievers, stimulants, or sleepaids). Sometimes the tea makers give the chemical name we're familiar with, other times they give the herbal name. Whether a chemical is synthetic or herbal, it's the SAME DARN CHEMICAL. And if you're already dosing with that medicine you're risking overdose. If you're NOT dosing with that medicine out of moral or health concerns...whoops! You just did.
- Black Teas (if you're avoiding high levels of caffeine)

Teas to read the ingredients/levels on:
- green teas
- white teas
- herbal (tea-leaf-free) teas

Teas that are Generally fine
- Chamomile
- Mild green teas
- Mild white teas
- Pseudo Teas (aka, warmed honey water with citrus, warmed apple juice with cinnamon & honey, etc. )

Teas I don't know enough to say anything:
- Rooibos/redbush

For US...we've allowed our son to drink mild green teas & toasted rice teas since he was about a year old. Black teas we allow if it's heavily laced with milk (aka, mostly milk)...and herbal teas (except for chamomile) we generally avoid...because I'm too lazy to look up all of their ingredients for uses/side effects/doseages.

:)

3 moms found this helpful

In some cultures, children drink tea or non-caffeinated types. Caffeine of course is very not good for children or teens.
Some drink Chamomile, mint tea, fruit teas, etc. There is also "Red Tea" which has many uses like helping for eczema, diaper rash, allergies, and a myriad of other things. You can Google it. Of course, analyze it for yourself.

I have also seen at Safeway, a tea for colds specifically for children. You might try going to your grocery store and looking... or at a Whole Foods, or natural food store.

Again, MAKE SURE your child is not allergic to anything in it...since these have natural/herbal blended teas.

Have you taken him to the doctor?
For congestion, whether nasal or chest, drinking LOTS of fluids (water) is always the best.
Orange juice, will make more congestion, when sick.
Milk also.

Warm fluids can help loosen it.
If his throat is sore, you might want to take him to the Doctor to make sure it is not Strep. They do a quick throat swab. Strep throat was going around in my town, among kids.

There is also a baby/kids version of "Vicks" vapo rub. This can be put onto his chest. Do not use the adult Vicks on him... too strong.

The "Animal Parade" brand also makes great natural vitamins for kids, and other things.
Hyland's also.... as Deanna Leigh mentioned once, they make a great "honey" cough syrup for kids... it does work and even I used it before for myself. It's soothing. YOu can find it at any natural food store.

BUT, watch the cough (coughs can indicate a spectrum of things/anything), and for any fever.. .this can indicate a worse illness or infection. If anything progresses or gets worse, or NEW symptoms arises, I would take him to the Doctor.

Here's some links on tea and toddlers (there are many opinions on it):
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=2008031116122...
http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/420922/why_its_o...

All the best, take care,
Susan

3 moms found this helpful

What I do for my daughter when she sick is make a special "tea" just for her - which is actually just; warm water, a teaspoon of honey, and the juice of a few lemon slices. It's a great natural/home remedy for cough and sore throat (I always use it myself when I'm sick!!). Plus my daughter loves it (I think she likes that's it's warm, unlike anything else she gets to drink) Good Luck! :)

3 moms found this helpful

My little guy has been drinking tea since he was 3 months old. We use organic chamomile (trader joe's, and whole foods-like places have it), but really any pure chamomile is good. I would stay away from black teas, and even some white and green teas as they may contain caffeine. Herbal infusions, like fruit teas are good alternatives too.

2 moms found this helpful

I've been giving my son tea since he was a year old. Herbal teas are amazing for kids. There's a recipe for ginger, lemon, honey tea on weelicious that I give him whenever he's sick or congested. It's heavenly!-www.weelicious.com

2 moms found this helpful

Hi K.,

I was having tea at a Tea House in Chula Vista with my Mother-in-Law and found Davidsons Children's Tea. It is Organic and is caffeine-free. I bought an 8 pack to keep in the house and it came in handy the next time my daughter got sick. She like the fact she was drinking tea which is normally a "grown up drink". Here is a website link to read more about the tea.

http://www.davidsonstea.com/store/index.php?click1=produc...

I hope your little boy feels better soon.
A.

2 moms found this helpful

absolutely! my 22 month old often drinks a cup of tea with me in the afternoon. (too cute, really!) i choose a Camomile mango herb tea wit a bit of sweetener(stevia or agave sirup). make sure it is warm not hot.
-c

2 moms found this helpful

One of the first things that my daughter has asked for when she wasn't feeling great since she was little bitty was warm tea. I love a tea called "Sleepy Time Tea" (You can find it at most major stores & I've even found it at Warmart) b/c it is a decaf herbal chamomile that totally soothes & really does relax to a point of making them sleepy. I always mix it with a little fresh lemon & organic honey to coat the throat & she just sips it down.

2 moms found this helpful

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