41 answers

Bumps on Skin

Hi there! So I meant to ask the Peditrician all these things at our 2 year check up with my daughter. Its so funny I had a list written out of all the things that I wanted to ask. So what do you know, I forgot the list, of course! Okay so my daughter has these white bumps on her arms and legs. First I thought it was acne because they sort of look like white heads with puss in them, but they are really small. Does anyone know about this? What are they? What causes them? How can I treat them? And will they ever go away? Thanks so much! Hope your having a great day!

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Featured Answers

as other have mentioned it is most likely Keratosis Pilaris. My sons has quite the cases, different times a year it flairs up more than others.

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KP. Depending on how aggravating it is, St.Ives has a scrub with salicylic acid that does a fabulous job - on a baby I'd be more likely to use Dermarest 3% salicylic acid shampoo, though.. and follow either one with Dermarest salicylic lotion.

The SA is a Beta Hydroxy Acid - and it is the only thing that I have found that works. I've had KP since I was a kid, as do both of my children... a week with the scrub or a couple of weeks with the shampoo + lotion and the bumps are gone until I get lazy about it again.

S.

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My daughter had these too. Her pediatrician said that it was dry skin. We treated it with Eucerin cream and nothing improved. When we went to an ENT/Allergist for an unrelated condition, she asked about this rash. We told her that the pedi said it was dry skin. She said that it was excema due to a food allergy. She did a skin test on her and we found out that my daughter was allergic to yeast. We cut out most forms of yeast (it is in almost everything) in her diet, and her arms and face have completely cleared up (it took over a year).
My son now has them too. We plan on taking him to the ENT/allergist soon.
Good Luck.

More Answers

Our pediatrician says it's Keratosis Pilaris. I googled it and it says: KP occurs when the human body produces excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin. The excess keratin, which is cream color, surrounds and entraps the hair follicles in the pore. This causes the formation of hard plugs (process known as hyperkeratinization). Bearing only cosmetic consequence, the condition most often appears as a proliferation of tiny hard bumps that are seldom sore or itchy. Though people with keratosis pilaris experience this condition year round, it’s during the colder months when moisture levels in the air are lower that the problem can become exacerbated and the “goose bumps” are apt to look and feel more pronounced in color and texture.

Many KP bumps contain an ingrown hair that has coiled. This is a result of the keratinized skin "capping off" the hair follicle, preventing the hair from exiting. Instead, the hair grows inside the follicle, often encapsulated, and can be removed, much like an ingrown hair, though removal can lead to scarring.

There is currently no known cure for keratosis pilaris, however, there are effective treatments available which make its symptoms less apparent. The condition often improves with age and can even disappear completely in adulthood, though some will show signs of keratosis pilaris for life. Some treatments are largely symptomatic and may need repeating. Regardless, exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, topical retinoids such as Retin A and medicated lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids or urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin.

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My ex hubby and his daughter have had white bumps on their skin even as adults. They gave him some exfoliation cream gel to put on it. Amyway has that same stuff. I forget what it is called. G. W

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Probably Keritosis polaris, not sure on the spelling. What is really means is the hair folicles are enlarged. It is hereditary and their are creams to use to keep the hair folicles from getting clogged with dead skin, which makes them look like pimples. I have it, and my son does too. It is mainly on the backs of my arms and when I was younger on my cheeks. My brother has it really bad on his cheeks and wouldn't you know shaving irritates it. Double check with your ped. and see if they want to prescribe something or if they want you to buy the creme over the counter. I think the cream is called Lac-hydrin. It is a high concentration of lactic acid and does sting a little until you have been using it for a while. I really moisturizes well, but the main thing is it keeps the skin exfoilated so the hair folicles don't get clogged.

Jen D.-Frisco

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as other have mentioned it is most likely Keratosis Pilaris. My sons has quite the cases, different times a year it flairs up more than others.

1 mom found this helpful

Hi T.! Sounds like Keratosis Pilaris - more commonly known as "chicken skin". I'm very familiar with the condition. I actually had it myself and as I've grown older, it's almost completely gone. My first born had a pretty severe case of it, so I took him to a dermatologist when he was a toddler. (By the way, his 1st born has it, too.) That's where I learned about the diagnosis. It's very common & completely harmless. KP is hereditary and there's no medical cure. Being in the sun seems to make it better. The doc directed me to lightly use a "buff puff" when bathing him followed by a hypoallergenic lotion such as Cetaphil or Lubriderm. Here is a website that has a lot of info + a picture that you can compare your daughter's "bumps" to. Hope this helps! D.

http://www.medicinenet.com/keratosis_pilaris/article.htm

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My son has Keratosis Pilaris and has had it since he was 2. He has it on his cheeks, back of his arms and thighs.
My doctor never mentioned that it was allergy related but did say to use a soap that was hypo-allergenic and non drying.
It gets worse for my son during the summer when he is in the sun and spends alot of time swimming and in the winter when the air gets particularly dry. We always keep lotion on him but apply lotion heavily during the times when he is bothered by it the most.

The only way to know if this is what your daughter has for sure is by asking the doctor but here is a link to some info on Keratosis Pilaris if that is what it is.

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/keratosis-pilaris/DS00769

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As others have said, it's probably keratosis pilaris (our ped. calls it "chicken skin." It's genetic and doesn't go away. I have it and so do my daughters. Another option is something called molluscum, you may want to google that and see if you think that's what it may be. It's a skin infection that can last 12 to 18 months. My 3 year old has that right now. Good luck!

1 mom found this helpful

KP. Depending on how aggravating it is, St.Ives has a scrub with salicylic acid that does a fabulous job - on a baby I'd be more likely to use Dermarest 3% salicylic acid shampoo, though.. and follow either one with Dermarest salicylic lotion.

The SA is a Beta Hydroxy Acid - and it is the only thing that I have found that works. I've had KP since I was a kid, as do both of my children... a week with the scrub or a couple of weeks with the shampoo + lotion and the bumps are gone until I get lazy about it again.

S.

1 mom found this helpful

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