16 answers

Bike Without Pedals for 2 Year Old?

I am thinking about getting my son a bike without pedals, since he still does not have the hang of the pedals on his tricycle, and it is frustrating for him.

I found these four brands:
http://pvglider.com/
http://www.bootscootbikes.com/
www.mykinderbike.com
http://www.stridersports.com/

Can folks recommend any particular brand? Thanks.

best,
P.

What can I do next?

Featured Answers

My boys (ages 3 and 2) love their strider bikes. They are lightweight and high quality. We got them from a mom who sells them locally and it was great to have someone to direct questions to and order spare parts from. She also holds playdates so the kids can all ride together. You can find her at www.portlandstriderbikes.com

1 mom found this helpful

Playschool makes one that is called glide to ride. You start with the balance bike and then the pedals can be put on when ready. It actually comes with pedals. I saw this on amazon.

There is also a go glider that has an adjustable seat (no pedals).

I've been looking at these, too. My daughter is finally getting the hang of the pedals, but doesn't go fast enough to keep upright without training wheels. I'm thinking of getting one for the kids to share (like a 5 and 2.5 yr old can share anything...ha ha). I need something we can change seat height on easily.

I'll be watching this post for more answers. Thanks for asking the question P..

1 mom found this helpful

More Answers

Just a consideration, but sometimes frustration is a very good learning tool. Children generally learn to pedal around the time they start using the toilet successfully (I say generally, not that this is a universal rule) because both have to do with muscle coordination. There's something to be said for waiting until our children are ready for the next step...

The reason I mention this is that it's been my experience as a nanny that young children on *fast* wheels at this age can be a safety issue. Trikes can be difficult to master, but they have some great advantages over scoot/balance bikes.Many quality brands often make their trikes bottom-heavy, which can help to limit accidents and tip-overs. Because of their weight, it's difficult for the kids to really get up a head of steam, unless they are going down a hill. My experience is that the lighter toys like scooters and balance bikes allow very young children to go very fast--without the advantage of brakes or the experience of stopping a fast-moving ride toy. I have had to chase down a lot of kids who got beyond hearing "STOP!" simply because their wheels go faster than my voice (and because, with a helmet on, their hearing is more limited.

All this to say, a seated low scooting toy, which will help with steering and balance, might seem like a step backward, but it may be more on par with a toddler/early preschooler's abilities. As someone who works with kids, I see more and more often that products are being marketed to children that aren't developmentally appropriate. It's my opinion that while scoot bikes are a nice transition from trike to bike, they should be thoughtfully introduced. I've seen a lot of sad accidents and near misses just in my neighborhood because of youngsters on scoot bikes going too fast for mom and dad. We want to empower our kids to feel competent at something, but once again, frustration is a great motivator and mastering a challenging task is a great life experience. You can also practice balance with your son on park balance beams, too. Just remember, if you do get a scoot bike--it might be best to take it to a flat school playground or paved area for lot of practice away from the roads and hills!

2 moms found this helpful

We just got a small bike off craigs list (for about $10!) and removed the pedals. It worked great and we saved a lot of money. Then when my daughter was ready to learn to ride it as a two wheeler, we just put the pedals back on. She had learned the balance so well already that it only took her a few hours to learn to ride it.

2 moms found this helpful

Wow! I never new such a bike existed. We bought our daughter a Big Wheel when she was 2 so she could learn to pedal and now she has a bike with training wheels. A cheaper option might be the bike/wagon that a parent can push from behind or kids can move themselves. I also came across these when I did a search because I was curious.

http://www.diapers.com/Product/ProductDetail.aspx?product...

http://www.toysrus.com/search/index.jsp?categoryId=225596...

Good luck!

1 mom found this helpful

Our son has a strider bike and we love it. It is sturdy and looks great and he can easily use it. When we ordered it they delivered it the next day.

1 mom found this helpful

My boys (ages 3 and 2) love their strider bikes. They are lightweight and high quality. We got them from a mom who sells them locally and it was great to have someone to direct questions to and order spare parts from. She also holds playdates so the kids can all ride together. You can find her at www.portlandstriderbikes.com

1 mom found this helpful

Can't you just take the pedals off the bike he has now, or trike and let him learn that way? Or push him around and let him get the hang of it.....

I think he would learn just fine with a little extra help.......but it's up to you.......I think they are all suitable if that is what you are looking for.

Good luck.

1 mom found this helpful

Our son is the same age and we got him a Strider because the seat and handle bars are height adjustable. Now if we can get him to wear the helmet he could actually try it out!

1 mom found this helpful

I think that it is an item targeted towards the baby industry unnecessarily.(which most stuff is) One could just remove the pedals off an ordinary bike or trike.

1 mom found this helpful

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