25 answers

Baby Sign Language - Stoughton,WI

I would love to start my son on some baby sign language. Any good books or suggestions on how to get started with that? - He is 6 months.

Thanks!

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Featured Answers

Baby Signs! We started at 6 months. She didn't really take to it at first but keep at it. My child is 3 now and she knows over 25 signs. She loves it and has fun showing them to me!

What I'm using for my son whose 4 & daughter whose is 9 months is baby see n sign from the library. Also signing time videos or dvds are helpful. Signing time also has books as well. Starting at 6 months is a good age from my studying & he'll start signing back around a year. I hope that helps, if you have questions you can reply back to me.

B. F

My parents are deaf and I wanted to get my children started with sign language right from the get go. A cute video is Baby Wordsworth, part of the Baby Einstein series. It is signs about things around the house. My kids loved it!

More Answers

Check your local public television station. In some areas there is a lady that does a program on baby sign that's really neat. I am sorry I can't remember her name though.

Baby Signs! We started at 6 months. She didn't really take to it at first but keep at it. My child is 3 now and she knows over 25 signs. She loves it and has fun showing them to me!

I did sign language with my son and now I do it with my daycare kids. It works great to keep everyone's frustration down when trying to communicate! The big thing that I would say is if you want to, make up signs that work for you and your kids. It doesn't have to be the "official" sign. For example my son loved bananas but the sign for banana was a little too complicated for his coordination when he was starting out. So I made up the sign of putting his hand in his armpit (inspired by a monkey, silly I know : ) to sign for a banana. The simpler the sign the quicker they pick it up. Then that gives them confidence to learn more new signs!!

J.

We used Signing Time DVD's which are terrific! The lady on there shows you and tells you the sign and then her daughter and her nephew performs to the music and shows the sign to you. They repeat it several times and incorporate other children. My kids were able to stay focused because it is so entertaining. We purchased them on e-bay but here's there website http://www.signingtime.com/

I learned right along and it helps to sign outside of the DVD. My child started the DVD's around 11 months and signed more soon after and between 9/30/05 (1yrs. old) - 10/31/06 (2yrs. old) she knew 57 signs. I logged her progression in Word.

Yay! Teaching your child to sign can be fun and rewarding. I taught our son ASL and I felt like we could have real conversations from the time he was about 13-15 months. So helpful during those frustrating toddler times.

Several of our friends have also wanted to teach their children to sign and have had varying degrees of success. I think it depends partly on the child, but a lot depends on the consistency and repetition of you modeling signs for your child. Videos are great learning tools, but unless your child makes the connection that it's a way to communicate with you, he probably won't attempt to replicate them. Think about how many times they hear us say words before they get the hang of that. Signing is a bit easier for them physically, but does require a lot of repeated demonstration. Don't get frustrated.

I highly HIGHLY recommend the book "Sign with your Baby" by Dr. Joseph Garcia. The first part of the book discusses his studies and methods and gives good advice on how and when to modeling signing for your child. It's a quick read and the latter half of the book shows several signs that are useful for babies/children. I found a few nice board books at an educational store and online, but I also would make signs for things in his favorite books as we read them. Goodnight Moon is great for that, or books of opposites, colors, animals, etc that you already have. Just use an ASL Dictionary or look them up here http://commtechlab.msu.edu/sites/aslweb/browser.htm

I also want to put in a plug for teaching your child ASL instead of "baby" signs. If you only want to teach your child a couple of words, then it's probably fine. You could make up your own signs without the use of any books and that would work great for those purposes. But if you're going to do it, why not teach him signs that he might build upon and use to communicate with others? Teaching your child sign language has the same learning/developmental benefits as teaching your child any other foreign language. I think if you approach it in that manner you can enrich all your lives and also give your son a building block that he can use in the future.

Check out this website: http://www.lifeprint.com/asl101/pages-layout/concepts.htm
It gives you some basics to start out with. I taught my daughter a few basic words before she started talking and she still uses them. She actually prefers to sign cat than say it. Also when she's done eating she does the "all done" sign.

What I'm using for my son whose 4 & daughter whose is 9 months is baby see n sign from the library. Also signing time videos or dvds are helpful. Signing time also has books as well. Starting at 6 months is a good age from my studying & he'll start signing back around a year. I hope that helps, if you have questions you can reply back to me.

B. F

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