Babies and Peanut Butter

Updated on June 01, 2011
D.F. asks from Saint Charles, MO
20 answers

How old was your child before you gave them Peanut Butter? I was always told not until after 2 yrs. I watch a 10 month old who constantly has breathing problems, colds and in general is sick. THis a.m. Dad brought him in and he had peanut butter all over him. I was surprised they were feeding him this. Dad replied oh he eats it all the time. Just wondered what other Mommys thought of this.

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A.G.

answers from Houston on

I gave my kids peanut butter before the age of 1. I doubt this kid is breathing strange because of a peanut allergy, peanut allergies are often very dramatic and obvious. Milk allergies can mask themselves as many things though.

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L.R.

answers from Washington DC on

Others are right, the hazard (since it's clear he's not allergic) is choking. A spoonful of PB is a sticky lump and could easily choke a child, even an adult (I find it so goopy I have to be careful eating it myself, even spread on bread or crackers--it's just really dense). I think 10 months old is way too young for PB based on the choking risk. A pediatrician would tell them so.

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S.L.

answers from Philadelphia on

Our pediatrician told us that unless there is a family history of an allergy we could give it to him. The evidence that giving them peanuts early will contribute to an allergy is weak at best and recent studies have actually shown the opposite is true.

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A.G.

answers from Houston on

I gave my kids peanut butter before the age of 1. I doubt this kid is breathing strange because of a peanut allergy, peanut allergies are often very dramatic and obvious. Milk allergies can mask themselves as many things though.

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D.C.

answers from Toledo on

I waited until 12 months for actual peanut butter, but both girls had peanut butter crackers well before they were 12 months.

This is my theory on the whole allergy thing: Unless you are buying foods that are peanut free and prepared in places where they don't come into contact with peanuts, they're already exposed. I honestly don't see what the big deal is.

I was always more worried about the choking factor, but I just kept a close eye on my kids while they eat peanut butter.

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E.T.

answers from Albuquerque on

The risk to babies is choking... peanut butter is STICKY!

As for allergies, there is not one study out there that supports waiting until age 2 or 3 to introduce peanuts. If you child is going to be allergic, they're going to be allergic no matter what age you give them peanut butter. (one of my daughters is allergic so I've thoroughly researched this!)

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D.K.

answers from Pittsburgh on

The main issue at this age is choking - which is a risk apparently until 2 years. We did not give DS peanut butter by itself or on a sandwich until he was 2. We did use it in cooking (cold noodles with peanut sauce - yum) from when he was about 12 months on. If he has had peanut butter without a reaction then he is not allergic to it.

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A.S.

answers from Casper on

Solids were started a 4 mos. which included tastes of PB off spoon or finger. I didn't hold anything back. We have ZERO allergies in this house and we are rarely sick. (I also don't use hand sanitizer)

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L.R.

answers from Washington DC on

Others are right, the hazard (since it's clear he's not allergic) is choking. A spoonful of PB is a sticky lump and could easily choke a child, even an adult (I find it so goopy I have to be careful eating it myself, even spread on bread or crackers--it's just really dense). I think 10 months old is way too young for PB based on the choking risk. A pediatrician would tell them so.

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P.L.

answers from Chicago on

My very good friend's daughter had her first anaphylactic shock at age 8 month old, they almost lost her.....
I don't even remember when I started....but I would rather wait...maybe get some soy butter...........

J.B.

answers from Kansas City on

They just keep changing the guidelines. With our 3 YO, I didn't want to give it to her til she was 3 because I'm allergic to strawberries and they said not to give any highly-allergenic foods to her until then. But we've given our 19 month old a little bit of peanut butter here and there already since now they are saying to introduce things sooner. Heaven only knows. So far (knock on wood) they don't seem to be allergic to anything.

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S.S.

answers from Los Angeles on

like others i would say this is more of a choking hazard than an allergy issue. however, i started giving my son pb at 1 years old and he loved it and ate it a lot. i took him to an allergist for other issues and he tested allergic to peanuts which was a huge surprise b/c he has never had a reaction. my allergist said that b/c i was giving pb so early that my son was probably developing an allergy. i took him to another allergist for a 2nd opinoin and this allergist said that the positive test was a false positive and he's not allergic if he's not having reactions. so basically, i still don't know if my son is allergic or not but i've stopped giving it to him in case it is making him allergic... so you could tell the parents that a) its a choking hazard and b) it could develop into an allergy if given too young (i heard not before 3).

D.H.

answers from Kansas City on

My two kiddos ate PB before they were a year old. They loved PB&J sandwiches at 10 months old. I have pictures of them with it all over them. They had no adverse effects from the PB and our pediatrician said it was okay to feed it to them. You may want to mention to the parents that other kids in your care may have allergies and to please make sure the PB is cleaned off before he gets to you out of respect for the other kids there. If he wants to give his child PB then that is his choice. But to be fair to those in your care you should mention something to him. Hopefully this helps. Good luck and God Bless.

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E.C.

answers from St. Louis on

You also have to consider other kids you may watch who might have allergies to peanuts/peanut butter. If the 10 mo old comes in with it on him then he is an allergy risk to your other kids. (That is if you have others or the potential for others to come into your home that may be allergic) Even in our middle school they do not allow lunches to be brought that have peanut butter or any kind of butter in them due to the risk.

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B.B.

answers from Missoula on

I really don't think this child's colds and breathing problems have anything to do with peanut butter. Unless there is a family history of allergies, delaying exposure to peanuts may actually do more to contribute to allergies than prevent them. This kid clearly isn't allergic to peanut butter, so the only issue is that it is a choking hazard for young kids. Of course, just about every food is a choking hazard for people who are just learning to eat.
I gave my son peanut butter by the time he was 9 months. I spread it thinly on toast and watched him closely while he ate, but he was fine.

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J.T.

answers from St. Louis on

With my 3 yr old, my doc's rule was 2. I now have one year old twins and just had their checkup. I asked about this b/c there are all kinds of articles saying to introduce nuts early. My doc was on the fence. She said I don't have to wait until 2 if I don't want too. The new info is that there is evidence that waiting until later to introduce foods could be the cause of allergies, since food allergies are on the rise with kids. I'm not sure that peanuts would cause the colds.

T.B.

answers from Bloomington on

I waited until 12 months. My son's did/do not have any problem with it.

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D.P.

answers from Pittsburgh on

I think I was advised to wait until one.
I think what a lot of people don't realize is that peanut butter is a very real choking hazard for little ones.

A.F.

answers from Chicago on

Recommendation is 2 years due to choking risk and 3 if potential food allergies. Most of my SILs waited till around 18 mos only. We won't be giving to any of our kiddos since our eldest has a life-threatening peanut allergy.

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J.P.

answers from Chicago on

I waited until about 15 months with my first. I was planning to hold off with my second for about the same number of months, but I turned away from the lunch table for a split second and (even though he had been told not to) my son was feeding my baby peanut butter at about 6 months. We've not had to deal with any allergies though, so I wasn't that worried. This boy may have a bunch of allergies which cause the breathing problems; it doesn't necessarily have to do with peanut butter.....

D.W.

answers from Philadelphia on

normally,you do not give your child honey or peanut butter at least until a year old. I would tell him nicely that you hear that children under a year old should not eat this. If you have a good repoire with the mom talk to her about your concerns. ask he if she has brought her son to an allergist since he has issues all of the time. Good luck

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G.B.

answers from Oklahoma City on

Peanut butter is a severe choking hazard to children under 3 years of age. If it is on other food and very thin it is usually okay. It breaks the "glue like" structure down to have other food at the same time. Like a tiny tiny amount on a cracker or on a piece of bread.

If your child is getting peanut butter and just eating it with a spoon or hands the person doing this is running a very high risk of that child getting peanut butter stuck in their throat and not being able to get it up...or down and then choke to death on it.

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