18 answers

At What Time Should a Child Stop Taking the Bottle?

My baby girl is now 23 months and she still takes her bottle through out the day and at night she gets up at least 2 to 3 times for her bottle. How can I stop her from getting up at night and slow down on the number of bottles of milk she takes during the day?

What can I do next?

Featured Answers

My husband is pediatric dentist in Plantation and he tells mothers to take the bottle away at 1 year. If they really need the bottle, he says to only put water in it as other liquids(milk, juice) can cause cavaties and rotting of the teeth.

1 mom found this helpful

All kids I know stop the bottle at 1 yr old. If she gets up in the night for a bottle that is way too old and a bad habit. Let her cry it out and in one week she will stop. She should not be hungry and want to eat in the midddle of the night. Both of my kids stopped asking for a bottle in the night at 5 months She is just in a bad habit. She shouold drink normal drinks like any kid or adult would. Good luck.

1 mom found this helpful

More Answers

I hate to be preachy and tell someone how to raise their kids, so I will just tell you what I was told by my pediatrician.

He had us take Leah off the bottle at 12 months. He said to finish up the formula and once we made the switch to milk, switch to a sippy cup. If you give juice or even milk in a bottle, it can give the child "bottle rot" which is decaying teeth because of the prolonged exposure to the sugar in the juice or milk due to the way the bottle sits in the mouth.

I know it's going to be hard because 2 is a tough age where they are starting to form their own opinions, but you have to stand firm and just take it away cold turkey. If you do it any other way, it will only prolong it. Throw them all away so you aren't tempted and just let her know what a big girl she is and that's why you are using a cup now.

Good luck!

1 mom found this helpful

Hi S.,

I have an 11 month old, I am a SAHM. I have a friend with an older baby and from what I understand by the time they are 1 you should begin to substitute the bottle for sippy cups.... and once they have conquered that task you go from sippy cups to a normal cup...

I think the most difficult time for your daughter to let go of the bottle would be in the morning and at night... but maybe you can try to introduce the sippy cup during the day... no bottle, and make sure she can't get to it or see it. Only take it out for night time... once she uses the sippy cup during the day, give it to her in the morning and then at night before going to bed... if you feel like it... I personally whether it the "right" thing to do or not, I have nothing against my daughter having her baby bottle at night, but I remove the bottle from her once she's finished, and if she wakes up, I let her sooth herself (its not easy!!!) but every day it gets a little better.

Good luck

1 mom found this helpful

OMG S. we are having the exact same experience, my daughter still drinks through the night as well, but luckily for us, she does not wake up she just sucks her finger till it almost falls off :). I don't mind giving her the bottle though becuase unlike your daughter who drinks milk throughout the day, my daughter does not. She only drinks her milk with us. However, I do hold the cup until she finishes to make sure it does not get left in her mouth but I truly wonder about her teeth. Next month when she turns 2 we will go for our first trip to the dentist, she will be on our dental insurance then. Trust me S. I know exactly how you feel but I can't help but worry about her nutritonal needs since she is not a good eater at all. Let me know how it goes.

1 mom found this helpful

S., I am sorry but your daughter should have stopped drinking from a bottle at one year old....all pediatricians say so, I am surprised yours did not insist on that...............At 23 months old she should be drinking no more than 24 oz of milk in total for the entire day is she eating enough food? She shouldn't be waking at night so much anymore and you are going to have to wean her away from drinking during the night..........If she continues drinking from a bottle especially drinking during the night when you cannot brush her teeth after she is going to end up with bottle rot and will more than likely need extensive dental work! I know she will cry when you are trying to just keep her happy but you are doing her a disservice he teeth are going to really get messed up!

1 mom found this helpful

Hi S.,
I'm going to be very honest about this situation. At 23 months, your daughter should be off the bottle completely. My first 2 daughters were totally breastfed, meaning no artificial nipples, bottles, pacifiers. However, with both of them, I introduced the sippy cup at 6 months and they took to it very well. With my third child I had no choice but to supplement with formula. Thus, I had to use bottles and by the time my baby was 10 months, I began swapping out his nipple with a soft spout. By the time he was a year old, he was off of the bottle. There isn't anything wrong with your daughter drinking milk all day. Give her drinks to her in a sippy cup. Also, she shouldn't be waking up for milk during the night. If anything, she should be offered water because the sugar in her milk could cause cavities. As far as her getting up during the night, well, she should be sleeping through the night. But every baby is different. Perhaps you could offer her some oatmeal, farina, or fruit before her bedtime. Maybe she's waking up because she's hungry for food, not for a drink. In any case, IF she is waking up for thirst, give her water...in a sippy cup. She really needs to be off a bottle. If she protests, remove the bottles from the house and show her that the bottles went bye-bye. I wouldn't suggest going cold turkey with this, however. Begin introducing the sippy cup after breakfast. If she refuses it, try again at lunch. Put water or juice in it and leave it out for her to take whenever she wants it. She'll get the hang of it and hopefully in a week or two, you can throw the bottles out. Even better, take her to the store and let her pick out her very own big girl cup and tell her that she will need to drink from which ever one she chooses...and then throw the bottles away. Good luck to you.

1 mom found this helpful

You must have heard so many times that every child is different. My grandaughters pediatrician recomended feeding her water at night. It's supposed to trigger a why wake up if I'm only gonna get water message. How well does she eat solids during the day? Maybe her last feeding before going to sleep could have some cereal in it, to keep her from waking so much during the night. Also consider the possibility that she may stop drinking milk altogether.

1 mom found this helpful

Hi. I believe most doctors and dentists recommend that the bottle be stopped around 12 months and definitely stopped by 18 months.

Some ideas to stop the bottle: (1) throw all of them away. It's like candy- If it is not in the house, you can not give it to her. (2) Only offer water in the bottle and milk in a sippy cup. Since water is usually less appealing than milk, she may switch. (3) Offer water only after 7 p.m. This will especially help with potty training. If your daughter is drinking bottles throughout the night, she is taking in too much liquid at night and may have a tougher time with accidents. (4) Make milk or juice only available at meal times and water available any other times. It is not the amount milk and juice that affects the teeth (bacteria, cavities, plaque) rather the frequency that the milk and juice are given. This was great advice given to us by our pediatric dentist.

I know it is easier to advise this than implement. Be strong and firm in whatever decision you make. If you do not stick to your decision 100% of the time your child will know that she can manipulate you and eventually get the milk bottles back.

Good luck! This is a hard habit to break, but not impossible by any means!

1 mom found this helpful

What i did just throw out all bottles in the house. At night give her water to drink. She will cry a few days, but don't give up, she'll understand, that there is no more bottle.
Good luck!
Best wishes,
V..

1 mom found this helpful

1 / 3

Explore Mamapedia

bottle weaning bottle weining
Required Fields

Our records show that we already have a Mamapedia or Mamasource account created for you under the email address you entered.

Please enter your Mamapedia or Mamasource password to continue signing in.

Required Fields

, you’re almost done...

Since this is the first time you are logging in to Mamapedia with Facebook Connect, please provide the following information so you can participate in the Mamapedia community.

As a member, you’ll receive optional email newsletters and community updates sent to you from Mamapedia, and your email address will never be shared with third parties.

By clicking "Continue to Mamapedia", I agree to the Mamapedia Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.