24 answers

9 Year Old Struggling with Multiplication

Anybody out there know of some good techniques to strengthen my 9 year old's multiplication? She's learning them but seems to struggle with the times table, especially the 6-12s. I've tried to find fun games on the computer and we've tried flashcards. I've heard that there is a song technique but not finding much online. I'm trying to get her freshened up for 4th grade! Thanks!

1 mom found this helpful

What can I do next?

Featured Answers

I agree with Betty. I had a friend who taught third grade and she made her kids write their multiplication facts on a sheet of paper like Betty describes every single day first thing when they got to school. Then they could go on to other things. They learned them and they got faster with it and they see the pattern of it.
I absolutely hated flashcards and could not learn them that way. I have to see a pattern.
I wish I had a teacher who taught me that way.

2 moms found this helpful

Some people just can not memorize the tables like myself thank goodness for calculators. I also had a 98 average in algebra, it took my longer but I am very good in math. I am an accountant. The most important thing is that she/he understands how to do the math, because in the real world they have computers etc. But if you do not understand how to do math problems, now that is a problem.
Guess what my teachers had no idea I could not do the tables, I could do up to a certain point then that is where it stops.

1 mom found this helpful

When I first taught fifth-grade math, I noticed that some students were counting on their fingers to add, and I said, "That may work for addition, but it won't work for multiplication." Imagine my delight when a student showed me the way he'd learned to do the nine times table on his fingers. Another help is that when a number is evenly divisible by nine, its digits add up to nine. That pointer can relieve confusion about 8 x 7 or 9 x 6...which one is 54 and which 56? Hope this helps!

More Answers

Hi C.,

There is a program called Touch Math that helps with both add/sub and mult/divide. For multiplication go to www.TimeTales.com.

Does your 9 year old have any trouble with spelling? or reading? Many children that have trouble with memorization have dyslexia and this is what causes those memory issues. Go to www.brightsolutions.us and watch a free webcast, "Could it be Dyslexia".

If you have any questions, email me. L.

4 moms found this helpful

You should check out the website of Greg Tang. He is the author of children's books dealing with math. He has some great tips to use. The website is www.gregtang.com. I just went to a training he gave and learned so much. Hope this helps.

3 moms found this helpful

Here is how I learned them sooooooooo many years ago. It seems like every Friday, our teacher had the whole class write the "multiplication table" from 0 x 0 = 0 to 12 x 12 = 144 on notebook paper, have our parents sign it and return it on Monday. We started at the upper left hand margin and went down the page skipping one line after 0 x 12 = 0 before beginning 1 x 0 = 0, 1 x 1 = 1, etc. When we got to the bottom of the page, we began at the top line half way across the page with the next "fact" so that we ended up with two columns. Then we turned the paper over and continued in the same fashion on the back of the page. It was tedious and Mrs. Ruth Cooke Jackson was adamant that we did it one line at a time when we were tempted to put a string of 13 "0"s down the page, go back and add the "x" sign, etc. I don't know how my classmates did it, but I was saying/repeating each fact to myself as I wrote it down. I also don't remember how many weeks in a row we had to do this until we "got it" but we all got it. I didn't know how fortunate I was to have learned the multiplication table until I got to junior high school and realized classmates who had not been taught by Mrs. Jackson didn't know how to multiply. Mrs. Jackson also promoted penmanship so I made my numbers just as precisely and neatly as I could. In my mind, I can see those hand-written pages even today. We learned by rote. Mrs. Jackson wrote the table on the blackboard for us the first time,perhaps even the first few times. If I were teaching my children at home, I would put the table in Word in Ariel bold font about size 16 and let them copy it until they have done it a few times. I would give them a special quiet space to do this work and I would have them show it off to their father for his praise. My own dad liked to see that I had made straight columns and was proud of me for learning. Blessings. Your children and husband are very fortunate to have you. B.

2 moms found this helpful

These are the websites I give my students. There are a ton of games out there but many of them aren't timed so they don't help them with the quick memorization. The kids will count in their head or on their fingers. I've listed the games under each website that I think are the best at helping them with the quick memorization:

http://multiplication.com/interactive_games.htm
* Go down towards the bottom of the first page to Quick Flash II

http://resources.oswego.org/games/
* Math Magician, Math Magic, Sum Sense (any)

http://coolmath4kids.com/0-timernator.html

Just for fun, your kids can go on any of these websites and do other games. I'd rather my kids play educational games than the typical computer games out there. The kids in school really like the coolmath4kids.com website as there is such a variety of games. Some have multiple players. Let me know if you have any questions. Multiplication is all about repetition. Might as well make it fun! Be sure to have your daughter do the timed games though. It will help her brain to figure out patterns and associations quicker.

2 moms found this helpful

Well for my 9 year old the following has helped. 6s aren't too hard. Like 5x5=25 so if 5x5=25 then 5x6 or 6x5 = 5more than 25 so that is 30. Little stuff like that. 11s are easy as they are the number doubled like 11 x 3 = 33 and so on. Then 12s are not too hard take say 3 x 11 = 33 so just add 3 more to the 33 that they already know. Little stuff like that helped my kids. Good luck. It can be a bit of a struggle but it will all be worth it in the end. Once they truly understand multiplication, division will be easier. Also, not sure if you have explained yet but if not this might help; 3 x 3 is just 3 + 3 + 3. If they can get that concept they will find it easier. Again, good luck.

2 moms found this helpful

I agree with Betty. I had a friend who taught third grade and she made her kids write their multiplication facts on a sheet of paper like Betty describes every single day first thing when they got to school. Then they could go on to other things. They learned them and they got faster with it and they see the pattern of it.
I absolutely hated flashcards and could not learn them that way. I have to see a pattern.
I wish I had a teacher who taught me that way.

2 moms found this helpful

Some people just can not memorize the tables like myself thank goodness for calculators. I also had a 98 average in algebra, it took my longer but I am very good in math. I am an accountant. The most important thing is that she/he understands how to do the math, because in the real world they have computers etc. But if you do not understand how to do math problems, now that is a problem.
Guess what my teachers had no idea I could not do the tables, I could do up to a certain point then that is where it stops.

1 mom found this helpful

The song technique you're looking for is the old ABC Multiplication Rock that used to be on Saturday mornings between cartoons (in the dark ages, I know). They're very catchy tunes, and I think they're available on CD. Try "Multiplication Rock" on Amazon.com. They should help. Several of them still get caught in my head (Good eleven, never has any trouble till after 9, Good, good, eleven. Eleven will always be a friend of mine.)
Good luck!

1 mom found this helpful

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