6 answers

6Year-old's Permanent Teeth Growing in Brown on the Bottom by Gumline

My daughter has been going to the dentist since she is 3 every year, before I make a trip to the dentist again this year, would anyone have any insight as to why a childs permanent teeth would grow in brown? My 6 year old lost her two bottom teeth. She has good hygeine-brushes twice a day, was off the bottle at one year, never drank juice on a regular basis and had her necessary flouride. She also never had any mouth trauma. Her teeth are about almost halfway in and the bottom near her gumline is brown. Kids are starting to notice, anyone know what this is and will it go away?

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So What Happened?™

Thanks to all the moms who responded with supportive advice. For those who wanted to know the outcome, here it is. My daughters teeth are coming in with a brown stain due to her baby teeth sitting on top of her permanent teeth under the gums. Because of the position of the permanent teeth under the gums the baby teeth resting on them caused an enamel deformity of the tooth resembling a cavity. The stains are NOT due to a cavity caused by decay or lack of dental hygeine. Once the tooth grows in it can be repaired by filling it like a cavity with a shade that matches her tooth.

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I know my response is coming in a few days after everyone else's, but maybe this will help. I had staining on my teeth when I was very little - when my permanent teeth came in. It was from a combination of fluoride, the water source where I grew up, and medication I had to take due to having severe pneumonia. I ended up having bonding to cover the staining (it was my front top teeth, so it was very noticeable). I would not suggest this route, however, because it commits your child to a lifetime of (potentially expensive) cosmetic dentistry - I have now had bonding, veneers, and have had to move to crowns on some teeth. Ugh.
I also have a mouth shape where my upper lip does not naturally meet my lower lip (you wouldn't be able to tell just by looking at me, but it causes my mouth to stay open when I sleep). People with this mouth shape generally have more cavitites or tooth decay because you don't generally salivate as much, and salivation is important to reducing the harmful bacteria (or whatever it is) in your mouth. So there are lots of reasons why your daughter may have staining, and her mouth shape, water source, medications, and just genetics are all possibilities. Just discuss it with your dentist and get second and third opinions, if you feel it's necessary. Lots of people have problems with their teeth for reasons other than lack of care...do not let anyone accuse you of neglecting your daughter's teeth. My parents were meticulous in their care of my teeth, and I still have had many problems (hopefully your daughter won't!). I wish you the best of luck.

Wow, im sorry u had to deal with the ignorance of some people. those types of comments ar not what this site is intended for.this site is for advice so if u cant give any good advice dont give any at all! As far as someone saying there is no excuse for a child getting a cavity, for someone who is married to a dentist she should know dental conditions could be hereditary and at no fault or "laziness" of the parents. But I was only a dental assistant for 10 yrs so what do i know. anyways got that off my chest, it could be as simple as staining, plaque buildup or something like medication staining, or maybe she might have banged her mouth without ur knowledge. whatever it is give the dentist a call with ur concerns, they might want to see her sooner then her checkup. ask ur daughter if she is sensitive to hot, cold or touch this is helpful for the dentist. they might want to take a simple xray. i wouldnt loose sleep over it. ur doing the right thing and it sounds like ur daughter has good hygeine!
lots of luck and let us know what happens im sure there are plenty of other people in the same situation and this can help them!

Sorry about some of the attitude you have gotten, you clearly state your dtr has been going to a dentist.
Anyways, call and see what they say about it. I have heard that some kids who are on alot of antibiotics as an infant can have stained adult teeth, it happened to my sister's nephew from all the ear infections he had. Good Luck!

I've gotten the impression (perhaps mistaken) that you're putting off going to the dentist and are hoping for a diagnosis from the board, and I don't know why that would be. These are her permanent teeth - don't wait. Book an appointment with the dentist today. This could be vitamin deficiencies, among other things. Call your dentist and/or pediatrician and make an appointment.

Hi G.,

Don't wait take her to see the dentist. Has she ever been to the dentist before?

Also, were you ever taking any meds while you were pregnant or if you breastfeeding were you on any meds? If you took any meds that were cyclines it could be that her teeth have been stained. Usually we see a lot of tetracyline stains.

Let the dentist see what it is and if it can be treated.

Stefanie

Sheesh! I'm not sure if there is a full moon or something... people are just being downright nasty today!

G., as others have suggested, I would take your daughter to see a dentist. I'm not sure why her permanent teeth are brown, but there could be some underlying problems that only a doctor would know about. A woman I used to work with had a similar experience with her son, and it turns out he had some sort of infection in his gums that needed to be treated with antibiotics. He was also put on a special medicated toothpaste that helped clean his teeth.

Hope you find the answers you are looking for! My best to you.

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