16 answers

3 Year Old Talking Back

I have a 3 year old that is talking back all the time. If he is told to do something he will say "don't tell me to..." or "I don't have too" I feel that I have tried everything to handle the situation when he talks back. I have put him in time out, tell him that it is unexceptable to talk back, and even have taken toys away. It seems that he is being very bossy to everything someone ask him to do. Does anyone have any ideas of what I should do when he talks back?

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So What Happened?™

Thank you everyone for the great advice. I tried some of the great tips I received this past weekend and saw a big difference. I think changing the way I ask him to do something has really helped.

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I always put my boys in their beds, not just their room, but physically in bed, until they can come out and talk to me appropriately. If they come out and don't say "sorry for..." or if they are still being adamant and inappropriate then they find themselves right back in their bed. If they find something to play with while in bed I take it away until they can come talk to me appropriately. We have a list of "Mom's House Rules" posted in the kitchen and the rule that gets pointed out the most is "If Mom says it, do it!" When they act out I tell them what I expect them to do and if they don't do it immediately I point out the rule and they usually comply. Having it written down some place they can see the rule often helps with compliance (visual aid). If they still don't comply I physically take them to their rooms until they do comply. I've had to carry them a few times kicking and screaming and I've had to lead them by the hand a few other times but they have finally learned not to talk back to me or they're in trouble and have to go to their room. It works for meltdowns, too.

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3 years, 3 minutes in the naughty chair. Hugs and an explanation after the time is up and expect an apology.

Consistency above all things. And tune in to Supernanny on Fridays. It truly is a goldmine of working principles.

In our home, that is disrespect. He knows it gets you going and may be enjoying the reaction. When my kids talk back, they get either a time out (minor talking back) or a spanking (more major backtalk), even my almost 3 year old. It is simply not tolerated. We also teach our children that the Bible says to honor your father and mother, and also to show them respect, I don't know where your beliefs are, but to us, this is breaking one of God's rules, and it deserves discipline of some form.
The key though, is being consistant. He will try to test you, but I promise you, if you let him continue to talk to you this way, it will not be something he can grow out of, and it it will get worse.
Giving him choices are good and can help him be assertive, but there are times (I am sure) that you can't give a choice, such as, hold a hand in a parking lot, don't touch Grandma's breakables, etc. If you do not believe in spanking, I hope I did not offend you, but we use it and it is effective and our kids are NOT hitters...
I hope it gets better!

I always put my boys in their beds, not just their room, but physically in bed, until they can come out and talk to me appropriately. If they come out and don't say "sorry for..." or if they are still being adamant and inappropriate then they find themselves right back in their bed. If they find something to play with while in bed I take it away until they can come talk to me appropriately. We have a list of "Mom's House Rules" posted in the kitchen and the rule that gets pointed out the most is "If Mom says it, do it!" When they act out I tell them what I expect them to do and if they don't do it immediately I point out the rule and they usually comply. Having it written down some place they can see the rule often helps with compliance (visual aid). If they still don't comply I physically take them to their rooms until they do comply. I've had to carry them a few times kicking and screaming and I've had to lead them by the hand a few other times but they have finally learned not to talk back to me or they're in trouble and have to go to their room. It works for meltdowns, too.

"You're not the boss of me!" Try hearing that and keeping a straight face. Well, my son learned that I am the boss of him (he even says I'm the boss of Daddy!) when he spent some time in his room after saying that. Disrespect is stairtime (timeout) and if he doesn't immediately go he's in his room for quite a long time. Sure he rages for a bit but usually gets on his bed and falls asleep (can you say tiredness causes this? Hmmm).
My son's school has a motto - respect is a two-way street. You get what you give. If he disrespects me, he gets no say in what goes on. Your son is testing you, just as many other kids test their parents. It's perfectly normal. It's nothing personal, he's just learned there so many choices in the world that he wants control.

My daughter is 2 1/2 and just as fiesty as your son...don't you just love it (ugh). I'm glad you posted this, so I can get some more ideas too. What I have been doing thus far (by no means perfect) is I pick my battles. I let her win maybe once out of ten times..then she thinks she is getting away with something, but also getting independence. For the times she doesn't win, when she talks back, I do time outs...maybe multiple, depends how long it takes her to listen and not talk back. I spent an hour one day, with 2 minute time outs, just to get her to pick up three toys. I finally won the battle and later that day when I asked her to put something away, she didn't hesitate. I will also use, stand in the corner, count to three, spanking, sit on the couch. I like to mix up my disapline so they don't know what it coming next. My daughter told me to shut up the other day (which we don't say that in our house) and I just looked at her and she ran to the corner crying. She knows when she is bad (doesn't stop her ever though!). I guess my main point it, let him win at somethings, it's great for his independence!

My daughter is going through this stage and I calmly resopnd with "I'm not asking you to...I am telling that you are going to...and if you don't listen you will sit in a time out for 3 min." Or sometimes I explain why she will follow with "...because we are at the store and I don't want to stop shopping again to go to the bathroom again." (the potty is a big one for us;)
I am a big supporter of requiring respect from my children! I am thier mother and they will listen to me. I never want to be in a siuation where my childs saftey is in jepordy and they turn to argue with me and get hit by a car. On that note I am very careful to make sure that I have realistic expectations! And I do give them choices when it is appropiate.
Many Blessings, K.

Absolutely!!
He is clearly trying to exert his autonomy... which is a good thing. If you consider 20 years down the line, what you want him to be as an adult...
Since you are aware he is likely to talk back when given a demand, the best solution would be to change your approach before giving him a demand. You may try something along the lines of... "son" (name) I see your blocks scattered on the floor, I have a need to keep the house clean would you be willing to put those back in the box for me?
Getting in touch with how his talking back makes you feel can help to, do you feel angry, attacked, disrespected, sad, frustrated? If requesting with would you be willing gets a no... continue communicating... ask him why not? Let him have time to answer. It may be simple, like I want to do this first, to which you can say okay so would you be willing to clean them up after doing that. He may say yes, and if he does, still supervise so you're not upset if he forgets. Feel free to remind him of the agreement. If you have stated a demand and he talks back, feel free to express your feelings to him. When I hear you say No to me, I feel sad because I need help keeping the house clean, would you be willing to tell me why you don't want to clean up?

I'm a parenting class instructor... these methods are based on connection parenting styles and non-violent communication. Please feel free to contact me at ____@____.com if you try this and get either good or bad results. I'll help you tweak to meet his personality and individual needs.

My hubby has a simple solution that works great. When he reply's negatively, simply say, "say okay." but say it in a matter of fact pleasant way. Say it how you would want him to say it.

He doesn't correct what he says he just tells him what to say what he wants to hear. 99% of the time my son (almost three) says it the way he it told to say it.

The other times he is told to sit on the couch and fold his hands. THen we talk about why he is sitting there. Because he didn't say what dad wanted him to say.

I have a tendancy to correct him and get angry with how he is talking but I am learning from my husbands interactions with him to simply have him repeat what you say and how you perfer he say it. And leave it at that.

These are the days we need to train them to say and do and even think in the right way.

I have a blog that discusses these kind of things. You may want to have a look at the section called CHILD TRAINING.

www.shapinglittlesouls.blogspot.com

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