51 answers

3 Week Old , Spitting up Constantly Even an Hour After feeding...any Advice

I have a 3 week old newborn that I am breastfeeding, we are concerned about him spitting up, sometimes even through his nose, even 1 hour after feeding. We tried to burp him after feeding, but he doesn't always burp. Anyone out there experience this? Any good advise? I especially afraid, when he spits up during sleeping. Also, does anyone's newborn poops when feeding? My son seem to do that everytime we feed him..

What can I do next?

Featured Answers

I had the same problem with all my babies.
My youngest was diagnosed with a short esophogus (tube from throat to stomach) and milk allergy. When I drank milk or ate or drank any milk products it would make his spiiting up worse. So while I was breast feeding I could not have any milk products.... ice cream, cheese, milk. The doctor told me that this problem is more common than people realize. They could not use formula except the milk free formula's. The doctors were able to put him on a medication to speed up his digestion after he was fed. (regalan) The short espophogus is usually outgrown by the age of 6 months.
Try and see if what you are eating or drinking effects the baby. I noticed right away after the doctor asked me about milk products. As long as I avoided milk products the spitting up was much better. What you eat or drink while breast feeding does affect the baby.
It is normal for a baby to have a bowel movement (poop) after eating. Especially breast fed babies.
Good luck!

1 mom found this helpful

L.,
When my son was little he would spit up constantly. I tried adjusting my diet thinking that maybe I was eating something he didn't digest well. I found that dairy was the trick. Very hard for me, because I love cheese. It immediatly stopped his spiiting up. Every once in a while if I had a glass of milk or cheese he would spit up again iuntil it was out of my system. Hope that helps!

M.

The spitting up is completely ok and is something he will outgrow. It's because the little flap at the back of his throat that closes off the top of his airway is not strong enough to stay shut and keep food down, this happens to a lot of babies and eventually it does get strong enough.

Might I suggest the infant care class via Kaiser? You don't have to be a member and has lots of great information. I took it prior to the birth of both my daughters. I have an 'addiction' to parenting classes and it's really wonderful help address common issues and alleviate concerns.

More Answers

I had the same problem with all my babies.
My youngest was diagnosed with a short esophogus (tube from throat to stomach) and milk allergy. When I drank milk or ate or drank any milk products it would make his spiiting up worse. So while I was breast feeding I could not have any milk products.... ice cream, cheese, milk. The doctor told me that this problem is more common than people realize. They could not use formula except the milk free formula's. The doctors were able to put him on a medication to speed up his digestion after he was fed. (regalan) The short espophogus is usually outgrown by the age of 6 months.
Try and see if what you are eating or drinking effects the baby. I noticed right away after the doctor asked me about milk products. As long as I avoided milk products the spitting up was much better. What you eat or drink while breast feeding does affect the baby.
It is normal for a baby to have a bowel movement (poop) after eating. Especially breast fed babies.
Good luck!

1 mom found this helpful

Hi L.,

as an RN and Lactation Consultant I immediately think that your son may have reflux. This is very common in newborns. The valve at the top of the stomach is not well developed so they tend to have stomach contents come up instead of staying in and moving through.

If he is spitting up and not distressed by it then you have a laundry problem for the most part. Generally we advise keeping baby upright or mostly upright after feeds for at least 10-15 minutes though babies with reflux often need 20-30 minutes. If he is distressed and the normal comfort measures do not help then you may need to talk with his physicians about medication options. We try not to use meds as a first resort but sometimes they are necessary. Most grow out of this by 3-4 months of age. Some with more severe reflux have it last longer. Severe infant reflux is a risk factor for reflux later in life so remember when he is finally setting out on his own to discuss the issue. :)

If he is refluxing while nursing, or if he is gulping at the breast from a fast flow then modifying his nursing position so he is more upright may help. Often we use a modified "football" hold where the bottom goes down and he is sitting or semi-sitting at the breast.

Offering baby a clean finger to suck on can help him control the reflux as well. You will probably feel him suck aggressively in short bursts then stop sucking or just calmly comfort suck between. We do not usually recommend pacifiers in the first month of babies life though some families find them necessary if baby wants to suck 24/7.

Burping is not necessary if he is a quiet swallower and controlling flow well so that he is not swallowing much air. On the other hand if he has some burps still to come out that can be contributing to the spit up as a burp can carry milk with it. I usually recommend at least 2-3 minutes between latches and 5-10 minutes of active burping after a feed. More may be needed if you find that late wet burps are part of the problem.

Pooping during or soon after feeds is normal and healthy. The act of sucking and swallowing helps stimulate peristalsis (the smooth muscle action that pushes the bowel contents through). You will need to change the poopy diapers, though quickly if possible as laying flat on his back will not make your son happy if he has reflux. (You do still need to place him on his back if putting him down to sleep. The only exception to that guideline is when a physician tells you otherwise for a specific medical reason.) Pooping rhythms change as babies grow and develop. Right now he is doing what he should. :)

I hope this information helps. Feel free to contact me with more questions or concerns.

K. H.

1 mom found this helpful

Call this free advice line staffed by nurses.

(650) 498-KIDS ###-###-####)
(800 690-2282
Health and development advice from the Parent Information & Referral Center at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, Stanford University.

1 mom found this helpful

The spitting up is completely ok and is something he will outgrow. It's because the little flap at the back of his throat that closes off the top of his airway is not strong enough to stay shut and keep food down, this happens to a lot of babies and eventually it does get strong enough.

Might I suggest the infant care class via Kaiser? You don't have to be a member and has lots of great information. I took it prior to the birth of both my daughters. I have an 'addiction' to parenting classes and it's really wonderful help address common issues and alleviate concerns.

Hello

My suggestion is to discuss your concerns with your pediatrician or a breast feeding consultant. I am breastfeeding my son also. My son did the same thing and the nurse at our pediatricians office said that sometimes they get air bubbles in their tummy. Also she said that if my milk is spraying out of my breast I need to first squeeze some of the milk out and then begin to breastfeed. She said that this could cause air bubbles in my son's tummy because he is not working for the milk....instead he is letting it spray in his mouth.

As for the crying spells I always sing or put soothing lullaby music on the cd player. Routines are also important. When are the crying spells happening?

Best if luck!

It could be something as simple as what you are eating. Have you tried giving the baby formula? My friends kids are lactose intolerant and she had to give him a special soy formula. I think its normal for babies to spit up, but if you are still concerned, maybe you should ask your pediatrician.

Hi L.. I'm a mom of 6 kids, 5 of which had reflux so I've BTDT. First of all, talk with your pediatrician and then I would also talk with a lactation specialist. La Leche League would be wonderful. All of my kids were bottle fed so we had the ability to reduce their feeds a little easier since we knew exactly how much they were getting. One of my little ones could only take a teaspoon every 20 minutes, 24 hours a day. Oh boy was that tiring!

There is a medicine your doctor can prescribe called Reglan. This helps with tightening the top part of the stomach so it decreases how much they throw up. My almost 4 y.o. is still on it. Someone mentioned Zantac and it works well and so does Prevacid. Find out from your doctor which would be better and how much to give.

On a good note, most kids out grow reflux about the time they start walking. So you have about a year of this is all which sounds like a long time now, but in the grand scheme of things it is a short time in your little one's life.

Hi L.,
This is VERY normal, please don't be concerned. It is a natural response, since newborns don't know when their stomachs are full they tend to over-eat a little. Gas is also a culprit, again totally normal.
I know how scary everything can be being a new mom, just try and relax and know that you are giving your baby an amazing gift when breastfeeding. Keep it up!!
Love,
V.
Mother of 2 and 1 on the way:)

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