32 answers

2 Year Old Son with Cavities

I just took my son to his pediatric dentist today and he has 3 cavities. The dentist wants to put him under anesthesia to do the fillings as he will not stay still or cooperate with him. I am a little freaked out about this! Does anyone have any experience on this? Thanks in advance for any advice!

1 mom found this helpful

What can I do next?

So What Happened?™

I just want to say THANKS to everyone for the advice and support! I ended up taking my son to another dentist for a second opinion. The second dentist doesn't see the hurry in getting the cavities filled right away as the cavities are very small and his teeth are not "soft". So for now we will be keeping a close eye on things and hopefully by the time we need to get the cavities filled my son will be old enough to use other methods of sedation. Again, I appreciate everyone for your time and experiences!

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I had the same experience with my oldest daughter when she was 4, she is now almost 7. I had her put to sleep on account of her anxiety and it worked great. She was given a mild sedative to relax her and it really worked. I hope this helps!

1 mom found this helpful

Hello L.,
Before I would commit to having my little one anesthetized, I would do a little research. If possible find out what will be used.

I had the same problems with my 2 year old daughter. I found a dentist in Rocklin who gave my daughter just the shot to fix her cavities. She had 6 and we split them up into 3 visits. The last one was yesterday and it was all successful. I went to 2 different dentists who wanted to IV sedate her and put all caps on the 6 cavities. All they ended up was filling 3 cavities and capping 3. No root canals either. The other dentists said she would have to have baby root canals. The office is Smile Island and their number is ###-###-####. I don't know where you are located at but it is well worth it. Good luck you can email me with any questions too.

Mother of 4 (15,10,2,1)

More Answers

Hi L.,

My daughter is 3 now, but we found a cavity when she was 2. By the time we got an appointment with a pediactric dentist she had 2 cavities and by the time she got an appointment at the hospital for the procedure she had 3 cavities.

She was given a general anasthetis in a hospital outpatient clinic. She was not given the choice of doing anything else and even if given the choice in retropect I would not have taken it.

The dentist said that her enamel never formed and so in addition to the fillings he put a coating on all the teeth where the enamel was missing or not properly formed. The whole procedure including Xrays took half and hour plus the few minutes that took to put her under.

I was in the room with her until she went to sleep with gas and then I left while they did the general and the procedure. When she started to wake she cried for me and eventually when they realised she was not going to settle without me they allowed me to come in.

It was a bit scary to see her so out of it, but as soon as she realised it was me (she is still breastfed and once I gave her the breast she realised it was me) and then she stopped crying and went back to sleep. She slept in my arms for another 2 hours and only remembers waking up in my arms.

Her experience with the dentist was so good that she was not at all afraid of going to the dentist when we had to have a check-up 2 weeks post the procedure and we are going again next week for a 6 monthly check up and she is all excited about going to the dentist.

Our dentist says that the holes were caused by the enamel not forming and this would have happened in the womb or at birth and it is not gauranteed that it will not happen again with her adult teeth, so it was important to me that going to the dentist was not traumatic. For her going to the doctor is very traumatic after some experiences she had as a baby (well that is all I can attribute it to).

The general anaesthetic did not worry me as it was conducted in a hospital setting with an anaethetist who specilises in children and a highly regarded pediatric dentist.

My recomendation to you would be to be calm about the whole affair and postive about it and prepare yourself for seeing your child in a state you amy never want to see them in, but know it is just the drugs and with the proper care around they are safe and will get through it and not remember it.

By ensuring they have healthy teeth through their childhood you are potentially saving yourself a lot of money in the future in terms of dental work, as if their teeth come out early their adult teeth will not grow with the correct spacing and they will more likely have to have braces later in life.

Looking after her teeth is a big deal in our house now and she is very involved in briushing her teeth and rinsing her mouth if she eats or drinks after brushing and before going to bed. The whole experience has been very positive and I think if you approach it positively it can have a positive outcome.

Do ensure though that the setting is safe with the mediacl support around, jsut in case.

Please feel free to contact me if you have any further questions ____@____.com

Good Luck,
K.

1 mom found this helpful

L.,

Its a hard decision either way, but you should go with your gut.
My opinion is...
I think it is in your child's best interest to be put under for the fillings. It will be a much less traumatic experience for him. Talk with the dentist about the pros/cons of it and make sure they are experienced in pediatric anesthesia. Thats my 2 cents.

Good luck,

M.

1 mom found this helpful

Hi L.,
I just had three fillings of my own. It takes a long time to do three fillings. It took three injections. My jaw was so sore and tired toward the end. I can't imagine either of my children being able to endure the shots and time of three fillings without anesthesia.

When my son was not quite two, he had a scratched cornea. I had to hold him down twice - for the doctor to look in his eye and also to put cream in his eye. I could hardly restrain him. It's so hard to say what I would do in your situation without actually living it. Based on these two experiences, I would seriously consider anesthesia.

Good luck!

1 mom found this helpful

I had the same experience with my oldest daughter when she was 4, she is now almost 7. I had her put to sleep on account of her anxiety and it worked great. She was given a mild sedative to relax her and it really worked. I hope this helps!

1 mom found this helpful

Hi,
First off, you should go with your instinct and don't do anything you're uncomfortable with.

That said, I've been through this with 2 kids. The enamel on their teeth never formed correctly so needless to say, my then 4-year-old had 4 fillings and 4 crowns. Believe it or not, they only had to sedate him. He drank a liquid (which is like Benedryl) which made him groggy, but not put under. The dentist said since he was not afraid or crying and screaming, the sedation would be enough.

My other son (then 2 1/2) was another story. He was crying and screaming even just sitting in the dentist's chair. Our dentist suggested waiting 6 months to see if my son would be calmer then.

We waited, he wasn't. The cavities needed to be addressed. Our son was "put under". Of course, I was completely nervous and freaked out. BUT our dentist uses a pediatric anesthesiologist who called me the night before to explain the whole procedure. By this time I completely trusted our dentist.

My son was "put under" and he had 5 fillings filled, his teeth sealed, and Xrays taken. He was 3 at that time and everything worked out fine.

My kids could (and should!) have a great fear of the dentist, but THEY DON"T! They actually don't mind going at all. I think if you find an experienced dentist who you're confident in, you'll be fine. You can't just let the cavities go. It can cause infection and abscesses which lead to worse things.

Sorry this was so long and I hope it helped!

Hi L.,

When my son was 1 year old, he was diagnosed with a genetic condition on his teeth. He did not have enough enamel, also called "soft teeth". His teeth were slowly disintegrating-looked like he was chewing on the crib. It got progressively worse-looking, and when he was almost 3, the dentist found his back molar had cracked and broken in half. We needed to fix his teeth-bonding and caps. Not sure if it was going to affect all teeth or just permanent ones. So 1 day after his 3 year old birthday, he was put under with a breathing tube (yes, very scary and stressful, but the only way because of his age and he wasn't cooperative).Well, our pediatric specialist is THE BEST! He works with Oakland Childrens Hospital for the anesthesia, and he is located right at Valley Care, Livermore. His name is Dr. Joshua Solomon and we love him.I wish you the best of luck:) -P.

I had the same problems with my 2 year old daughter. I found a dentist in Rocklin who gave my daughter just the shot to fix her cavities. She had 6 and we split them up into 3 visits. The last one was yesterday and it was all successful. I went to 2 different dentists who wanted to IV sedate her and put all caps on the 6 cavities. All they ended up was filling 3 cavities and capping 3. No root canals either. The other dentists said she would have to have baby root canals. The office is Smile Island and their number is ###-###-####. I don't know where you are located at but it is well worth it. Good luck you can email me with any questions too.

Mother of 4 (15,10,2,1)

Hi! When my daughter was about 4 or 5, they wanted to do this. Instead, I waited & tried another dentist office. They were more patient & caring, so my daughter had her cavities filled the regular way at the dentist office.

However, will they be doing this at a hospital, or just at a dental surgical center, or at the dentist office? Since your son is only 2 yrs old, you should see what your regular pediatrician thinks. Does your child have any health problems at all? (If I remember correctly, an oral surgeon once told me that when she has had such young patients, she does this at the hospital just as a precaution. So, ask your regular pediatrician.) & Make sure that they explain the procedures completely, the anesthesia, recovery time, etc.

Good luck!

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