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18 Year Old Son's Curfew

What is an appropriate curfew for an 18 year old male at home

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He's pretty mature. He's leaving for college next week. he's usually across the street or in the driveway when he's hanging out. so he thinks he doesn't need a curfew if he's out there. what do you think

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I think it's appropriate for an 18 year old to stay out as long as he wants, unless he comes home making a ruckus and waking everybody up.
Good luck!

3 moms found this helpful

I'm a little biased. I joined the USMC when I was 17. NOTHING got me acting like an adult faster than being treated like one.

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No Curfew for our daughter once she was 18.

But we all let each other know what time we will be home. This way we could totally lock up the house.

She says even at college they all let each other know what time they will be back to their rooms, for safety reasons. If someone has not returned as promised, they call them to make sure they are ok.. Our daughter says some of the girls stay all night at the libraries working on research, but they still call (text, email) just to touch base with each other.

4 moms found this helpful

I don't have a curfew for my 18 year old. She lets me know where she is and approximate time she will be home, but other than that, she is a legal adult. I figure at least while she is living here, I know kind of what she is doing. She could move out if she wanted and I would have no clue! Plus she is respectful and still asks us if she "can" go do stuff instead of saying "i'm doing this". Sometimes it's hard to let go, but it's time!

4 moms found this helpful

I think it's appropriate for an 18 year old to stay out as long as he wants, unless he comes home making a ruckus and waking everybody up.
Good luck!

3 moms found this helpful

I think at 18 it's time to start being responsible for yourself.
My son doesn't have a curfew but he's always been really good about checking in with me, and he still does.
He knows I still worry about him :)
I plan to do the same thing with my almost 16 year old daughter when the time comes.
We don't do our teens any favors by treating them like children. They need to learn how to manage in the world and make decisions for themselves, especially when they are working and/or about to leave for college.
My son goes next month too! I'm happy and sad all at once :) :(

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If he's a good kid and gives you no reason to worry, I think it's time to let the curfew go. He's leaving soon anyway and will have total freedom and you will have no idea what he's doing or how late he's doing it. It sounds like you've raised him well and if he's not doing anything to make you concerned (other than not knowing where he is), then let him go. It's reasonable to ask him whether he will be home and approximately when so that you know whether to leave lights on, etc. Give him a key so you can lock the doors if that worries you. You can certainly tell him what time you want kids out of your house in terms of noise, although my son always has friends in the basement and they go out the bulkhead quietly, so I don't have a problem with it. We're firm about alcohol in underage kids, and we're quick to clamp down on any attempted violations. My son knows there are severe consequences, and he's been great about it.

Trust that you have raised a good kid if he's just across the street, and be prepared to let him stretch his wings.

3 moms found this helpful

When I was 18 I no longer had a curfew. I simply had to tell my parents whether or not I'll be home so they knew whether or not to lock the door. I was a responsible kid and never got into any trouble. But they figured if I could go away to college or the military and be on my own, I should have the same rights in my home. It may have been reverse pyschology though, now thinking about it. We never fought about curfew and I was really proud that they trusted me enough with this responsibility. Since I was given respect and trust, I returned the favor to my parents. Out of respect, I tried not to come home too late, there were always exceptions, but for the most part I was home before 1 am. If I wasn't coming home, I told them which friends house I'd be at and gave them the phone number.

Just saw your update. I wouldn't care if he was in the driveway or across the street, it sounds like he's not getting into any trouble just hanging out with friends. We did that a lot the summer before college since we all went to different colleges it was nice to have them time to be with friends. Just make sure he is quiet when he comes in as to not wake you.

3 moms found this helpful

I'm a little biased. I joined the USMC when I was 17. NOTHING got me acting like an adult faster than being treated like one.

2 moms found this helpful

My oldest son just turned18 in may. He no longer has a curfew (although technically my kids don't have a curfew). Although I find it amusing that he still asks me if he can go over to his friends houses ... I almost told him "You're an adult now ...you don't have to ask permission to go" but I held my tongue. He'll figure it out sooner or later. He'll be living at home while he goes to his first two years of college at the local community college.

I would say if he's mature and responsible ... he's right. If you can trust him to go off to college I'd think you can trust him to be across the street or in the driveway. As long as he's not disturbing the neighbors or you when he comes in.

2 moms found this helpful

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