33 answers

18 Month Old Fights the Breathing Treatment

Ever since my sons first cold, he has been wheezing. Everytime he gets a cold it goes straight to his lungs. (We always seem to have a check up right when he gets a cold) He is always in good spirits and it has not affected his eating. I have rarely heard the wheezing, just the doctor. When the cold goes away we are back to business as usual. He has no allergies or any other problems. The doctor wants him to have Albuteral every 4-6 hours and a breathing treatment of Pulmicort once a day. He fights these treatments by kicking, screaming and holding his breath. I have tried to give it to him in front of the TV, still didn't work. I tried sneaking in his room last night but he woke up crying. The doctor said it may create long term damage if we don't treat this. Does anyone have any ideas of how to get this treatment done? or are there alternatives? These treatments are really wearing me down.

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My son was started on breathing treatments at a young age also and he didnt like it at first but the dr told me that when the child is crying or screaming it actually works the best since they are continously sucking in air. Eventually he got over it and we made a game out of it. Give him time and he will come around with it. Good Luck!!!

E., I agree with one of the other moms, my now 6 year old had asthma from the time he was born. He has out grown it now thank goodness. But he had to have breathing treatments all the time. He even had the kid friendly mask and it still didnt work so I used just the plain mouth peice. And it worked so much better and what I did was let him mess with my husbands video game system while he did the breathing system. He was more involved with what was going on the tv and that he was moving the characters then what was in his mouth. Good Luck I know it is a challenge.

We had to do this with my son as well. I put him in the high chair so that he's a captive audience.

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Hi E.,
My son has asthma and has been on flovent since he was 8 months. He is now almost 4 and every time we have tried to ween him off he's been hospitalized. It has been very frustrating. We've used a nebulizer and he has been on lots of steroids.
I just got to the point where I decided enough was enough and I went in search of alternative ways to deal with it. I started asking myself what could be causing the problems since his diet had been changed and we had found a new home for our cat.
What I found was the Body Ecology Diet. Basically in a nut shell it was created for those of us who have an overgrowth of yeast in our systems. When our children are born they should be innoculated with all the healthy bacteria in our bodies, but when we don't have it to pass on, they're digestive systems don't form properly and they can get what is called leaky gut. What this means is that there are places along the digestive track that are permeable and when certain foods are eaten they slip through the holes and into the bloodstream causing allergic reactions and other ailements. The overgrowth yeast wipes out what healthy bacteria we do have in our systems making it very difficult for our bodies to digest food properly and/or heal themselves.
Even an 18th month old is smart. My son used to fight the treatments too. I wish I had known then what I know now. I urge you to please go to the body ecology website www.bodyecology.com and take the candida quiz. I also would urge you to get your child on the probiotic drink that it suggests. You can make it at home. Asthma will not correct itself, but we can correct it with proper diet and nutrition. Get the book, read it- join the messsageboard and poke around. And feel free to email me if you have any questions.
Blessings,
J.

3 moms found this helpful

we just held down our sons arms. nobody liked it. but the issue of what was more important just ruled. safety and health first. it helped me feel ok with it. we only have had to do it in winter also. wasn't sure how old this child was... if it was an 18m old. i have a friend that does it while he's sleeping too.... just put in front of face and run a fan for noise all night so he doesn't notice.

My son has needed neb treatments on and off since he at RSV at 3 mo. He is 3 years now. He went for almost 2 years without needing any treatments, but started wheezing a few weeks ago with a cold. We did try to make it a game, we called it his astronaut mask and did it in front of the TV at times. You have a 4 yr old, I have two of those, so I used them to my advantage having them show him how to do it- since the younger ones want to do whatever their sisters are doing, he was a little more open to it. When he was younger, I would do it while he was sleeping. I would turn the machine on across the room or in the hallway while he fell asleep, that way turning on the machine wouldn't be a sudden new noise in the room to rouse his sleep. Once he was asleep, we would put the medicine in and do the treatment

I know it is hard! Good luck

Dear E.,

i am a mother of two daughters with ashtma and i also have it myself. I also have a child at my job that has a hard time. I know your son is only 18 months but i found it to be easier and helped calm them down when i went to walmart or any drug store and bought flavored chap sticks . I rub it on the mask where the child can smell it and i put enopugh on it to make the smell stay on it until the treatment is over. I have also tried the mouth piece and let my kids chew on it . I think the biggest thing for them and myself is the taste of the medicine that bothers us . I hope this might be of some help .. But always remember to ask your dr for the options of different meds or go for a second opinion . I did and we where changed from albuterol to xopenex which doesnt make our hearts race s fast and we shake less. Best of luck. Jenny

My son was started on breathing treatments at a young age also and he didnt like it at first but the dr told me that when the child is crying or screaming it actually works the best since they are continously sucking in air. Eventually he got over it and we made a game out of it. Give him time and he will come around with it. Good Luck!!!

When we had to put my son on Flovent (inhaler w/ a mask), at around age 2, he fought this too. My husband and I had to hold him, one held his head, the other his body, so he could get the breathing treatment. It was a nightmare. Even worse, he needed this during the day so I had to have his preschool staff administer it. I warned them and the first afternoon picking him up they said they prepared themselves but he did fine. What?! Seriously?! After that, he didn't fight us anymore.

So, perhaps having another relative try it without you around might help.

I'm also a big advocate of preparing your child and explaining to them what to expect. I don't think I did that with him originally with the inhaler so maybe that scared him. Usually we do though, even when it comes to shots ("It's going to hurt, but Mommy will be right here holding your hand. You have to be really still though 'cause if you move, it'll hurt more. So let's be really still together so it only hurts a little bit, and then it'll be all over.")

Good luck.
Jen

We had to do this with my son as well. I put him in the high chair so that he's a captive audience.

Hi. My son had the same issue. He is 7 now but we started with his inhalers, etc. when he was just 3 years old.

I would recommend getting a second opinion, because this is a lot of medicine and for sure it affects behavior. I am not not recommending holding off on the medicine (we did medicate my son) but just get a second opinion from our WONDERFUL allergist - Dr. Paul Detjen in Winnetka. He has never steered us wrong. My friends, whose children have the most severe asthma and allergies, only go to see Dr. Detjen. His number is ###-###-####. Good luck!

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