12 answers

15 Month Old Still Wont Sleep Through the Night

My daughter just turned 15 months and still wakes up 4-5 times a night for a bottle. We have taken the bottle away during the day and she is fine with that. But at night she still wakes up for it. We switched to only putting water in it at night .We have tried letting her cry it out a few times but she will literally cry for 3-4 hours straight till she is throwing up. And of course I give in then. Should I just stick it out and let he cry ? or is there something else I can try. She does sleep in her own crib for the most part. But is in our room. Please help!! I cant even remember what its like to sleep all night lol.

What can I do next?

So What Happened?™

Well we got the book "Sleeping Through the night" that was recommended , And by following what it said with just a few changes she was sleeping through the night pretty regularly. And also got completley off the bottle at the same time. She still wakes up some nights but can pretty much get herself back to sleep. There are some nights that she wakes up and still needs comfort but I think it is from nightmares or night terrors. As she will wake up at the exact time of night very scared and its hard to get her to calm down. SO thank you to everyone who gave their great advise. Its so nice to finally sleep again!!!

Featured Answers

I am the mother of three children, ages 8,6,and 3. I never let any of my three children "cry it out"! Personally, I think that is cruel! My almost three year old STILL wakes up a couple of times a night for water! Good Luck, but I say, be attentitive to their needs!

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I am the mother of three children, ages 8,6,and 3. I never let any of my three children "cry it out"! Personally, I think that is cruel! My almost three year old STILL wakes up a couple of times a night for water! Good Luck, but I say, be attentitive to their needs!

3 moms found this helpful

HI!

I feel your pain. My daughter (now 3 years old) didn't sleep through the night until she was 16 months old. She woke up 6 or 7 times a night wanting to nurse. Some of her problems were due to her temperament, and many of them were my fault. I was a walking zombie by the time we found the book, "Sleeping Through the Night", by Jodi Mindell, Ph.D. We couldn't stand the thought of just leaving our sweet baby alone in her room crying for hours, but we knew we had to do something. This book has a wonderful, more gentle approach to sleep training, and it worked like a charm for us. We're now using the same method with our 7-month-old son, and he's sleeping about 6 to 7 hours at a time (WAY better than our daughter did at that age!). I highly recommend the book.

Hang in there!

1 mom found this helpful

wow, you are getting very different responses to your question. in my opinion your baby is soothing herself on the bottle. some children have night terrors and wake from them in a frightened state, i think the "cry it out" method may be adding to the problem, escpecially since you mentioned she will start throwing up from it. maybe instead keeping her in the crib you could keep her in the family bed or a mixture of the two. as it is she wakes up and see's the bars of the crib, for a while maybe let her wake up and see you until the needing the bottle stops, then maybe you could ease her back into the crib at your own pace once she is sleeping through the night in bed with you. i know this may be something your husband will not like, but it works with my daughter, she will sleep a full 10 hours a night, doesn't even nap during the day, although we never used a crib. we went from family bed to putting her in her own big girl bed at 2 yrs old.

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First, let me say big hugs to you--this is a tough spot but you will make it through! You are doing the right thing by seeking answers...God bless and best wishes to you in setting things back on track. :)Now, on to my thoughts...

I am as big of an advocate as you will ever meet for the Babywise program (i.e. following a routine, putting babies down awake from the very beginning so they learn to fall asleep on their own--which sometimes does involve "crying it out.")

HOWEVER...With your daughter being the age she is, even I am not sure I would advocate a straight cry-it-out approach. To me, that would be literally rocking her entire world by trying to solve the situation too quickly. It took more than a week for this problem to develop, and it's going to take more time than that to set her sleep habits on a new course. (This is just my opinion.)

I wish I had some good advice for you, but I think you need to do some research to figure out a gentler, (but still STRUCTURED) plan for where to go from here. Go to the bookstore and do some free browsing of the books others have recommended in order to find the one you want to go with...and if I were you I'd also try contacting the Babywise organization and see if they have any modified advice to fit your situation.

Whatever you do, try to put together a definite game plan for how you are going to handle the crying. If you are not consistent with what you do, nothing is going to be effective. Also, look at her nap schedule...Are there things you could change about her daytime routine that might translate into better nightime sleep?. It will probably be easier to make changes to her daytime patterns as a start. For example--when are her naptimes, and approximately how much sleep is she getting?

I have a daughter that age who does sleep through the night...She is right in between that one nap/ two nap transition. In her case, (depending on what is going on for us that day) she either takes one long nap after lunch (appr. 2 1/2 hours) OR she takes two short naps (about an hour nap around 11:00 and another hour nap around 2:00). I'm just throwing this out to give you something to compare to--not saying you should force your daughter on that exact schedule.

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Try feeding her more before bedtime.

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That doesn't sound typical of a 15 month old. She could be having nightmares. There could also be something physically wrong. Maybe she has a bit of reflux, wakes up in a bit of pain and needs liquid to calm her throat and stomach. I do hope you get some answers and some sleep soon. I remember too well what that is like.

Letting her Cry It Out is cruel and teaches her that you won't be responsive to her needs. Especially if you are letting her get to the point of throwing up, I just personally can't do that to my children, and don't see how other people think it is ok to do that to babies who are only seeking comfort and support from their supposed caregiver and nurturer. They are babies and yes at 15 months she is still a baby. I do agree with the try to get her moved to her own room though, I moved mine when she was around that age and things leveled off and with some soothing, love and attention she slept fine in her own bedroom.

I have no advice about bottles though since neither of mine had a need for bottles since I choose to breastfeed them.

The first thing I would do is move her crib out of your room.Next I would try starting let her put herself down at night - this will envolve lettign her cy it out, but you can go in every 15-20min or so and reassure her that ou are there still and you love her - just don't pick her up if at all possible. My son was wakign up alot at night and unable to get back to sl;eep on his own, but now that we are letting him put himself down - when he does wake up he fusses for a moment or two and then goes right bac to sleep - at the most we go in and give him his pacifier back or cover him up again - and he goes right back to sleep.

It is hard at first but in the end everyone will feeel batter with a good nights sleep. Good luck!!

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