50 answers

13 Year Old Daughter Wants to Dye Her Hair!

She has presented various reasons why we should let her, but I am still on the fence, what is your opinion?

What can I do next?

Featured Answers

It's only hair. I dyed mine at 13 or 14 and loved it. I felt like such a super special girl for months. Looking back, I realize that I looked totally silly, but at the time I was so happy.

Unless you have a real reason why it would be a bad idea (family portrait? funeral?)... let her. It's a great way to let her rebel a little without truly rebelling.

What color does she want to do??

4 moms found this helpful

I personally don't see a probem with it as long as it's just an experimental and non-permanent thing.

I experimented with my hair and my daughter wanted to experiment with hers. I could tell you horror stories about some of the experiments, on MY hair. She actually went on to attend cosmetology school. Doing hair is her thing.

Having a few highlights is one thing. A complete head full of blue hair? Nope. Not at 13.

Just my opinion.

3 moms found this helpful

I wouldnt. Because the up keep is expensive, I would rather my 13 year old not walk around with 3 inch roots (classy), and I wouldnt pay to have it done every 3 months.
Shes only 13, I would focus on something else.

2 moms found this helpful

More Answers

I had a wise psych professor who always said, ask yourself if it will effect their lives in five years, if the answer is no then it isn't a battle worth fighting.

My oldest daughter started dying her hair when she was 13, by the time she was 14 she was bored with it. She is now 22 and has yet to alter her hair since, besides an occasional hair cut.

7 moms found this helpful

I'm not a fan of anything permanent at this age, but I willingly helped my son use semi-transparent coloring when he was this age. His forest green hair was the best, although I thought his purple hair was great, too.

6 moms found this helpful

It's just hair! It grows out. Let her experiment a little with some highlights or some colorful streaks and see what she likes. No big deal.

My older daughter, now 27, tried a whole spectrum of colors and styles between junior high and finishing college. I think she may have been trying to shock me and she failed! I said, if you can't experiment with hair when you're young, then when can you? I told her she was beautiful, and she was, with black, bleached white, or magenta hair, and even when she took a clippers and cut it all off!

She has her natural dark brown color now in a conservative style. Youth is for experimenting!

6 moms found this helpful

my boys had hair every color of the rainbow. i don't get why a kid shouldn't!
khairete
S.

5 moms found this helpful

My line would probably be "bring me a report card with straight A's, and you can dye your hair any color you want." (If she was already getting straight A's, I'd probably give her the go-ahead.)

In other words, I am pretty lax about things like hair color, but I'm not above using an issue like hair color as leverage around things I really care about.

It's funny, though, a few people said, "If it looks natural, if it's not pink or blue, etc., it'd be okay." I would probably be *more* okay with a girl dying her hair pink or blue than with a girl trying to look like a bleached-blond barbie doll. I'm not going to do the best job in the world explaining why, but I'm wondering if anyone else feels the same.

5 moms found this helpful

I am a hairstylist, my opinion on this really depends on what she wants to.do with her hair. I would not suggest for a 13 year old to.do anything that requires a lot of upkeep. A good option for her would be to.go.with a semi or demi permanent color if she wants to go darker or redder, or a partial hilite if she wants to go lighter. If you go with hilites, do small pieces around the face in a color not more than a feiw levels lighter than her natural color so it will grow out gradually. Another good option is to do a hilite/lowlite, from a few feet away, her hair would look the same color, but up close it would have more dimension. I would call a salon, schedule a free consultation, then you can get a good idea of what she wants, what it will involve and how much it will cost. Then decide what you are going to do.

Around 8th - 9th grade is when most girls get their first chemical service, so shes about the right age. The rule I go by is As long as they have had their periods for.over a year, it means their hair is 'mature' enough to accept the color and not be damaged by it. I only recommend wash out colors up to that point, and will not perm girls younger than that. Good luck and Im envious of whoever gets to do her hair, I love doing girls first colors, they get so excited.

5 moms found this helpful

I'd have no problem with it, actually. When my daughter is 13 and she comes to me with the same issue, which she will I'm sure, I'll tell her "Cool, if you can pay for it, you can get it done." This isn't a battle I'd be willing to fight.

4 moms found this helpful

It's only hair. I dyed mine at 13 or 14 and loved it. I felt like such a super special girl for months. Looking back, I realize that I looked totally silly, but at the time I was so happy.

Unless you have a real reason why it would be a bad idea (family portrait? funeral?)... let her. It's a great way to let her rebel a little without truly rebelling.

What color does she want to do??

4 moms found this helpful

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