14 answers

1 Year Old Turning Foot Inward When Walking (Assisted)

Hello ladies. I have an appointment with my pediatrician on Monday (our one year - went by so fast!) but I thought I'd ask the Moms first to get some advice on something I've noticed. My little girl is now standing, cruising, and will walk if you hold her hands but hasn't taken independent steps yet (soon enough). Anyway, when she is walking assisted (ie holding my hands), she turns her left foot inwards something fierce. But when she is standing or cruising on her own she seems to keep them parallel.

As anyone seen this? Do you think I have to wear a special brace or shoes on her to correct? As I said, the pediatrician will surely advise me on Monday, but I am inpatient (and concerned) plus I feel I will be better prepared emotionally if I have some idea what she might tell me.

I should also add that she was born with DHH (hip dysplasia) and had to wear a pavlik harness for four months but Xrayed perfectly normal at 6 months.Presumably these two things are not related since the harness turned her foot out rather than in.

Thanks!

What can I do next?

So What Happened?™

well the pediatrician wasn't concerned at all and said it was perfectly normal. we had our regular appointment with her orthopedist this week - 3 weeks later - and now that she's walking unassisted her feet are fine! ortho says all is well!

Featured Answers

This is called "in-toeing" and is very common. I noticed it on my now 5 year old daughter when she was 18 months old. She has been seeing an orthopedist from Children's Hospital every 6 to 12 months since then. Basically, they don't do anything by way of braces or corrective shoes anymore. The doctor told me that they don't really help and are just a nuisance for the child. Once they determine that her hips and bones are normal, you just wait for her to grow out of it. My daughter's gait has improved steadily over the years and the intoeing is now only noticable if you are looking for it and if she is tired or wearing clunky boots. Good luck and try not to worry!

More Answers

I would refer her to early intervention for a developmental assessment - it's free and it doesn't hurt to get their opinion. I also second seeing a chiropractor - you can find a pediatric one at www.icpa4kids.com -
M.

Point it out to your doctor and ask for a referral to the doctor he thinks would help or for an evaluation for Physical Therapy. My son inherited my feet which were slightly turned in when I was born, we did not notice this with Nick but when he did start to walk and run he was all over the place (never a straight line) we found out his feet are turned in and flat and this gives him balance issues.

He wears the low shoe inserts called SMOES and will have to wear these until he 'stops growing'. These have changed the way he walks and run..the feet are fully connected to balance.

But you do need her checked out so they might be able to work with her now so she might not have issues later (PT, maybe a small brace etc)

We have a wonderful chiropractor that fixed the problem with one of our children. Her hips were out of place causing twisting in the legs.. thus the feet turned in. A gentle manipulation solved the whole problem within seconds.

This is called "in-toeing" and is very common. I noticed it on my now 5 year old daughter when she was 18 months old. She has been seeing an orthopedist from Children's Hospital every 6 to 12 months since then. Basically, they don't do anything by way of braces or corrective shoes anymore. The doctor told me that they don't really help and are just a nuisance for the child. Once they determine that her hips and bones are normal, you just wait for her to grow out of it. My daughter's gait has improved steadily over the years and the intoeing is now only noticable if you are looking for it and if she is tired or wearing clunky boots. Good luck and try not to worry!

Hi,
Yes, to another set of xrays, read by a pediatric orthopaedic specialist. And then I think you should consider having your pediatrician refer you for a private PT assessment or for a free one through Early Intervention (in the phone book). This evaluation will give you baseline info, and whether therapy is warrented or not, you will have this baseline for comparison as she grows.
Take care!

Hi J.,

Please, please, please ... be sure to find a GOOD doctor and see him often ... and be sure to get a 2nd, and third, and even fourth if possible opinion!

Goodluck!
J.

First of all, it could be related to the hip dysplasia and probably warrants another xray. But... many kids turn one or both feet inward or sometimes outward when they are first learning to walk and this usually corrects itself. The fact that she is only doing it when you are assisting her may mean that she is gripping your hands so tightly or her arms are up and over her head, which can cause something called "overflow" of muscle tone. Sounds complicated, but it's really not. It's the same idea as when you are pulling really hard on something or lifting something heavy, you tense other muscles in the process without even being aware you are doing it. This could be causing that foot to turn it when you are assisting her. Try holding her hands lower and see if this makes a difference. When you see your pediatrician, demonstrate it for him so he can actually see what she does. It may warrant a return visit to whomever gave you the harness, but try not to worry too much. Best of luck.

My DD was turning in one foot for a little while on and off. She actually never really walked assisted, she just started walking on her own at a year and it wasn't at that point, it was later. Her doc said they don't use the braces anymore and that it would probably correct itself (she did NOT have hip dysplasia though). She does have regular chiropractor adjustments, so not sure if it was the chiro or if it just sorted itself out but it is fine now. I'd definitely ask the doc about it and if you aren't confident in what he/she has to say pursue it futher but it might be sorted out on its own.

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